Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Allen ADC 5400 Capture Problem

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Allen ADC 5400 Capture Problem

    My wife just noticed a problem on her organ at church (an Allen ADC 5400) today... The Swell Fourniture IV stop cannot be saved to a piston. If the tab is depressed manually, a general cancel raises it, as does the activation of any piston (since the stop is not saved). All other stops can successfully be saved and cancelled. Any ideas about where to start troubleshooting before our closest Allen tech. makes a 120 mile road trip? Thanks to all in advance.

    #2
    I think I'd defer to John on this question. That said, however, is the tab difficult to press or raise? Also, is your church in a humid environment?

    The Symphony's ADC-6000 had a couple of stops that wouldn't set when I first obtained it. On the tab mechanism, there is a pin, on which the tab pivots. To fix mine, I just put a drop of WD-40 on each end and moved it up and down several times. The other possibility is that sometimes a tab will pivot slightly to the side, and will be pressed against the tab next to it. If this is the case, you can simply move the tab back where it belongs and that should solve the issue.

    If the issue is electronic, John will need to search the data online to see which wire would be at issue. Non-techs do not have access to Allen technical data. I have an ADC manual, but the ADC-5400 schematics are not in it.

    Hope this helps.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

    Comment


      #3
      Most likely a faulty reed switch on the stop bracket. It is also possible that the magnet is slightly out of alignment.
      td

      Comment


      • samibe
        samibe commented
        Editing a comment
        Mine have two. One for the multiplexer and the other for the capture action.

      • smithge31419
        smithge31419 commented
        Editing a comment
        Just a clarification... The tab "feels" normal and works fine. It just cannot be saved to a piston.

      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        I've never replaced that capture reed switch. Is it difficult to replace? I would also imagine vertical positioning in relation to the magnet is important. Just be sure you mark the original location and orientation of the reed switch so it can be replaced correctly. I replaced a pedal reed switch once, and found the vertical positioning was exceedingly important.

        Best with the repair.

        Michael

      #4
      My vote is for a bad reed switch. On ADC models there are two reed switches on each drawknob assembly pc board -- one connects to the daisy chain that runs from the USCM board to turn on the associated stop, the other one goes directly to the DM-3 board and serves to tell the DM-3 that the stop is drawn whenever a memory "write" cycle is initiated. If that reed switch is defective, the DM-3 cannot detect that the stop is drawn and thus writes it to memory as "off" whenever a combination is set on a piston. So it will be pulled in with any piston press.

      Unless you're prepared to check the reed switches with a meter, locate the one that isn't closing, then to order the correct switch, unsolder the bad one and replace it, you'll need to call in the Allen tech, who should be able to take care of it quite easily. There is always a chance that the reed switch would start working again if you futzed with the magnet, or if you used slight finger pressure to nudge the reed switch one way or the other. But there's probably a greater chance that you'd just break something and wind up having to spend even more money to get it fixed!

      While you have the tech on site, be sure to have the organ thoroughly looked over so you don't wind up calling again in just a few weeks for yet another minor problem. I'd suggest paying whatever it costs to have him or her go over the organ from stem to stern and inspect the speakers in the chambers as well, and take a close look at the wiring and other aspects of the installation.

      No doubt it will be pricey, since you're 120 miles away. Be aware that your tech may not travel alone to far flung jobs (as I no longer do, I always take my associate because some jobs require a second set of hands). So a service trip 120 miles each way requires a total of four hours of driving (or more if traffic conditions don't allow traveling at 60 mph all the way), and that means that fully one-half of the work day for two highly-skilled technicians is occupied just getting there and back. Most of us can't afford to simply donate our travel time, so you'll have to pay for both travel time and for the vehicle mileage, as well as the hourly rate for the actual repair time. It's going to be several hundred dollars, but consider that it would cost $100K at a minimum to replace that organ with a new one, making the repair quite a bargain!
      John
      ----------
      Church: Allen MDS-45 with Allen MIDI-DIVISION-II expander
      Home: Allen Renaissance R-230 with expanded four-channel audio and MIDI-DIVISION-II
      Shop: Bunch of organs in varying conditions, some good, some not...
      Half of an incredible two-man organ service team -- servicing all the major digitals in Arkansas churches
      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • smithge31419
        smithge31419 commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, John. That gives me something to look for. I'm pretty good with a multimeter. That said, Our Allen tech has been quite reasonable with his billing, so I'll probably do some poking around to give him an idea what he's facing and then give him a call. (assuming the church will agree to spend the $$). He did a hundred thousand mile checkup on it a few months ago, but I guess that's just part of the joy of an old organ. We should consider ourselves lucky. Went to an organ concert last spring in one of our historic churches that has an Aeolian Skinner... It refused to run for 2 hours while the audience waited. Local tech (hero) applied band-aids and the patient audience was well rewarded.

      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by smithge31419
        The Swell Fourniture IV stop cannot be saved to a piston. If the tab is depressed manually,....
        Originally posted by jbird604
        On ADC models there are two reed switches on each drawknob assembly pc board
        John,

        I believe Smithge has a tabbed organ–not a drawknob. I would assume the answer is still the same?

        Michael

      • jbird604
        jbird604 commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, the tab assembly also has two reed switches, for the same reason as the two on the DK assembly.

      #5
      Smithge,

      How did your repair turn out?

      Michael
      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
      • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

      Comment

      Working...
      X