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  • Hexagonal Pipes



    Because most of the pipes in my brother's home organ (now about 3/4 complete) are visible, he has decided to make a rank with hexagonal cross-section. At first he planned to align the mouths with the angled side, but that would produce a too-wide mouth, so he's having to use the flat side of each pipe.</P>


    This is strictly academic, but does anyone know of other hexagonal pipes?</P>

  • #2
    Re: Hexagonal Pipes



    Well, I don't know of any hexagonal pipes, but I ran across an organ in Copenhagen that had square metal pipes.</P>


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/8712554...7607136744868/</P>


    David</P>

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    • #3
      Re: Hexagonal Pipes



      Hexagonal I haven't seen yet. But if he wants something a bit out of the ordinary he could look here for inspiration: http://physics.kenyon.edu/EarlyApparatus/Rudolf_Koenig_Apparatus/Organ_Pipes_Non-Linear/Organ_Pipes_Non-Linear.html</P>

      There is no reason why it wouldn't work. But I'm a bit at loss with your description of "angled side". All sides are flat but angled with respect to each other. Don't really see it before me.</P>

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      • #4
        Re: Hexagonal Pipes



        Havoc, I'm guessing he was thinking about having the mouth cut across one of the corners, with some sort of transition section leading to a chord across the adjacent sides (think of using a knife to carve a flat across one of the angles of a pencil). This would be a pretty complicated construction. However, using just one of the flat sides for the mouth definitely limits it to a width of 1/2 the diameter.</P>


        David</P>

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        • #5
          Re: Hexagonal Pipes



          That's what I tought as well, but I'm not sure. There is no need to carve a flat across an angle. You cut a flat across each side forming tha angle so they come out at the same line. To visualise it, pretend you have a normal square wooden pipe. Now bend the face containing the mouth in 2 and put them at an angle. The mouth of a normal metal pipe is part of an arch, it isn't a chord. Here you would have a mount consisting of 2 straight parts. </P>

          No easy, but then he is making hexagonal pipes. It isn't he is going for the easy solution anyway!</P>

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          • #6
            Re: Hexagonal Pipes

            [quote user="davidecasteel"]Well, I don't know of any hexagonal pipes, but I ran across an organ in Copenhagen that had square metal pipes.


            http://www.flickr.com/photos/8712554...7607136744868/[/quote]My apologies forcorrecting you David, but those pipes are wooden. That Compenius organ is world-renowned for having only wooden pipes. [:)]</P>

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            • #7
              Re: Hexagonal Pipes



              No apology necessary, SB32, and I am happy to have the correction. I was not given the opportunity to examine the instrument and the color of the pipes certainly suggested that they were metal. I am sorry for having posted incorrect information.</P>


              David</P>

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              • #8
                Re: Hexagonal Pipes



                Anyone remember the name of the builder that attempted to sell those stained glass pipes? They were used sparingly as a center on a tower or flat. Wonder why he stopped selling them?</P>

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                • #9
                  Re: Hexagonal Pipes

                  Actually if I remeber correctly the 32' facade of the origional organ in the mormon tabernacle are hexagonal wood pipes that are roundedon their exterier to make them look round.

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