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  • Style D Wurlitzer

    I have always loved the Style D Wurlitzer. It has onr of everything:



    RESOURCES

    8' Trumpet

    16'-4' Open Diapason

    8'-4' Tibia Clausa (put on its own trem and reservoir)

    8'-4' Salicional

    16'-2' Concert Flute

    8' Vox Humana

    Chrysoglott

    Chimes

    Xylophone

    Glockenspiel

    Traps and Effects



    Since many Wurlitzers didnt have many 16' stops on the solo and no couplers, I would re-spec it as this:



    PEDAL 10 tabs

    16' Bass

    16' Bourdon

    8' Trumpet

    8' Open Diapason

    8' Tibia Clausa

    8' Cello

    8' Flute

    Bass Drum

    Kettle Drum

    Cymbal

    Accompaniment to Pedal 8'



    ACCOMPANIMENT 16 tabs

    8' Trumpet

    8' Open Diapason

    8' Tibia Clausa

    8' Salicional

    8' Flute

    8' Vox Humana

    4' Octave

    4' Piccolo

    4' Salicet

    4' Flute

    4' Vox Humana

    2' Piccolo

    Chrysoglott

    Snare Drum

    Tambourine

    Castanets

    Accompaniment 4'



    SOLO

    16' Trumpet (TC)

    16' Bass

    16' Tibia Clausa (TC)

    16' Contra Viol (TC)

    16' Vox Humana (TC)

    8' Trumpet

    8' Open Diapason

    8' Tibia Clausa

    8' Salicional

    8' Flute

    8' Vox Humana

    4' Octave

    4' Piccolo

    4' Salicet

    4' Flute

    2 2/3' Twelfth

    2' Piccolo

    1 3/5' Tierce

    Cathedral Chimes

    Xylophone

    Glockenspiel

    Chrysoglott

    Solo 16'

    Solo 4'



    ACCOMPANIMENT 2nd TOUCH

    8' Trumpet

    8' Open Diapason

    8' Tibia Clausa

    Sub Chrysoglott

    Solo to Accompaniment 8'



    SOLO 2nd TOUCH

    16' Trumpet (TC)

    8' Trumpet



    TREMULANTS

    Main (Tuba, Diapason, Salicional, Flute)

    Tibia

    Vox



    The traps on the Accompaniment would be avaliable thru tow studs with
    the remainder "stock" traps. The crash cymbal would be moved to a piano
    pedal where it is much more convient.






  • #2
    Re: Style D Wurlitzer



    Not a bad idea. The D I am restoring has a 210 console so there is room for the tabs howeverI plan on keeping the EP console action. I an planning on using Artisan for the relay as we couldnt get the original relay out in one piece and I'm using Artisan presently on 6 ranks. Why the Sub Chry on A2?</P>


    I'm not sure where the couplers would fit. I dont recall any on the console.</P>


    Al</P>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Style D Wurlitzer

      Well the bigger wurlitzers have a sub Harp so you can play "chicago"
      style (chop-chop) music. Hold the cords in the left hand and push thru 2nd touch on the off-beats. Its a
      great effect. I am helping restore a 210. Theres a few more tabs thena style D and
      they want a piano. It all just fits!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Style D Wurlitzer

        I am quite interested in your comments on the Style D Wurlitzer. I have made a few modifications to my Style D and found that some are more useful than others. In order of priority I would place the changes from the standard as follows:
        1. Separate tremulant for the Tibia - Makes the organ sound much bigger.
        2. 16' Tibia on the Solo - Obtain that rich, full bodied theatre organ sound.
        3. 16' Trumpet on the Solo - Richer sound, easier to play solos in the tenor range. Not too useful to use the 8' and 16' Trumpets as a Trumpet and Clarion (played an octave up).
        4. Accompaniment to Pedal Coupler - Great for classical music, makes pedal registration follow accompaniment automatically for both classical and popular music.
        5. Solo to Pedal Coupler - Rarely used.

        The octave couplers that are listed on your post duplicate stops that already exist. Due to the extensive unification already present, the octave couplers are of limited usefulness, mainly as somewhat of a registration aid.

        I almost never use the accompaniment 16' stops included in the original instrument. I am not sure why these stops were included in the original design.
        Allan

        My home organ
        Style D Wurlitzer pipe organ
        http://bluemoonwalkinghorses.com/Sty...tion5_rev3.htm
        Five Newfoundland dogs
        Sixteen Tennessee walking horseshoes

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Style D Wurlitzer

          I agree on all changes except the Solo to Pedal coupler. I dont think
          they are needed until you get into a 3 manual console (13 ranks or
          more). just my opinion. I believe it is VERY important to have a
          variety of 16' stops on the Solo. It makes more sense and its easier to
          register. I also agree with the tibia since it sounds a lot better on
          its own trem.



          The Trumpet, Diapason, Violin, and Flute would be on one trem and
          reservoir, and the vox and tibia on seperate regulators and trems.



          Will hopefully sounds great! I am trying to get a Kimball Violin which
          are the BEST strings in my opinion. Sound alot better then a Wurlitzer
          Salicional.......



          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Style D Wurlitzer

            Cleveland High School in Portland OR. has a Kimball. The strings have a very nice sound. The Style D Salicional is not as refined a sound but has the beef to blend well with the Diapason and/or Tibia.
            Allan

            My home organ
            Style D Wurlitzer pipe organ
            http://bluemoonwalkinghorses.com/Sty...tion5_rev3.htm
            Five Newfoundland dogs
            Sixteen Tennessee walking horseshoes

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Style D Wurlitzer

              The other change is to put the 16' offsets on their own regulator minus trem.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Style D Wurlitzer

                Excellent suggestion!

                All the pedal offsets including the 8' Flute, 8' Tibia, 8' Diapason should be on an untremmed regulator. I forgot to mention this essential change. The pedal has a much more stable sound especially the 16' Bourdon which has a better attack. The large pipes do not take very well to the tremulant action.

                My Style D has 4 regulators Main, Tibia, Vox (all Wurlitzer three valve type), and Pedal (church type with a single valve). The tremulants are all Wurlitzer, 2 large for the Main and Tibia and one small for the Vox. The mechanicals (swell shades, relay, console, percussion) use static air to avoid disturbances in the regulated air. The tremulants are winded from the opposite end of the chest from the air supply using 2" rigid wind line about 12' long with a minimum of two elbows included. The result is that the tremulants can be adjusted for a wide range of depth and speed without using weights. The pitch variation is smoothly symmetric - not choppy. With the tremulants off, the pitch variation is small so that the higher pitches do not waver when a low pitch note is struck in the same rank.
                Allan

                My home organ
                Style D Wurlitzer pipe organ
                http://bluemoonwalkinghorses.com/Sty...tion5_rev3.htm
                Five Newfoundland dogs
                Sixteen Tennessee walking horseshoes

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Style D Wurlitzer

                  Is the Tibia of a Style D usually of 10" scale and unleathered?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Style D Wurlitzer



                    Yes and No. A style D Tibia was a "regular" scaled Tibia Clausa, voiced on 10 inch wind pressure. Wurlitzer was very picky about their product leaving the factory built to an exacting standard. One of the Wurlitzer part numbers is Y106MS, which is Buckskin...the typical leather used for their Tibia Clausa mouths. Each stop built in the factory, (as well as everything else), had an accompanying "work tag" that followed the stop through it's complete production process. That work tag was pre printed with everydetailed step of the fabrication of that stop, with a space on the tag for the individual worker to initial after he had finished the next step in the production process. These work tags were scrutinized by department managers (Wurlitzer was famous for their inner office and inner factory paperwork), to account for ongoing labor costs of individual workers, and also to detect workmanship flaws at the end of the production process. For this reason, you can be sure that "leathering lips" was one of the specified steps on the work tag in the production process of a Tibia Clausa. Your Style D Tibia almost surely left the factory with leathered lips. </P>


                    I have seen as many unleathered Tibias as I have leathered ones, in my own experience. However, most unleathered examples I've seen have had remaining evidence of leathered upper lips being there at one time, (discoloration of the wood, remaining traces of old glue, etc. etc.).</P>


                    Occasionally, there were specific requests made by organists when a new organcontract was signed. (You might suspect that an organist requested your Style D Tibia without leathered lips). However,voicing details were usually ignored by the factory. Requests for a different stop than called for in a particular model organ were usually honored by the factory, but that was about the extent of changes that would be made by the factory.</P>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Style D Wurlitzer



                      Has anyone got a decent console pic of a Style-D in it's original format (not modified or added to) please.</P>


                      If so, please could you e-mail to me at: wurliman1970@yahoo.co.uk</P>
                      <P mce_keep="true"></P>


                      Many Thanks</P>

                      Comment

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