Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Suggestions please -- clonewheel solution for young student's bedroom

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Suggestions please -- clonewheel solution for young student's bedroom

    I have been asked by the mother of a 16 year old boy to help her son get an organ at home.

    This young man joined a stream of kids at a recent pipe organ concert at a local church aimed at introducing young piano students to the pipe organ. It was a very successful day, with so many young people wanting to sit at the bench and have a go that it took 60 minutes to get through them all!

    When the 16 year old sat down at the manual he belted out a great version of Take the A Train and got a big round of applause. Clearly this kid is into swing and jazz. I later leaned that his piano teacher focuses on jazz.

    He told his parents that he wants an organ at home, but his father considers an organ to be "too big" in the house. (I suspect the real agenda is that the father doesn't want to fork out for a regular organ.) So, it looks like a virtual organ is the way to go. Something compact enough to set up in his bedroom.

    Given his jazz penchant and prowess I am going to let him loose on my M-102 and also introduce him to the B-3.

    What would members suggest as a good and relatively inexpensive hardware and software rig to build a two manual 'clonewheel' at home? He especially wants to learn pedal, so a full B-3 pedlaboard capability will be a requirement, but not necessarily from Day One.

    All suggestions and experiences welcomed.
    -------

    Hammond M-102 #21000.
    Leslie 147 #F7453.
    Hammond S-6 #72421

  • #2
    In my opinion nothing is better than the real deal. Whatever he gets, someday he’ll have to upgrade. That being said, it’s true financial decisions sometimes take precedence for these things. Getting one of the modern Hammond keyboards would work pretty well, a step down but still pretty good are the viscount legend series. You can always get a pedalboard later, and there are lots of midi options. What I did is get a two manual stack, and I bought some authentic Hammond tone controls from an LSI era Hammond, and I’m building them into the control scheme, then using B3X. The Nord C2D is a pretty good option, but they don’t make them anymore.

    If the kid’s into Jazz, the Hammond is a good fit and a cool organ, but don’t forget about the theatre organ! I’ve heard lots of Jazz standards very convincingly rendered on one, and he may think its even cooler! The most recent Hammond SK Pro has theatre organ sounds, but Hauptwerk or the like may be a better way to go about that one (or get an older theatre organ console).

    Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
    Former: Yamaha E3R
    https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Larason2 View Post
      Whatever he gets, someday he’ll have to upgrade.
      Yes, but at this stage -- a high school kid -- he'd be very happy to have anything that sounds like a real organ.

      Viscount Legend is a good size-wise, but probably too pricey at this point in time. I get the impression that it will be a step-by-step project on a budget.

      I'm thinking a two manual key stack, a good PC and maybe something like B-3X. Anyone have experience with the B-3X app?


      -------

      Hammond M-102 #21000.
      Leslie 147 #F7453.
      Hammond S-6 #72421

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd suggest a used or new Roland VR-09B. It's very compact and can be played on a chair or bed (but needs an amp). What swayed me to get mine was this video of a guy playing an M3 and a VR-09 through a Vent.



        The VR-09 will accept anything that sends MIDI as the second manual and supports any MIDI pedal set. There's also a control program that runs on an iPad that adds B3 style controls. (Oddly, there's also a PC program that accesses the hidden sounds, including the Atelier sounds, also on the board.) I have a Juno DS-61 under it. VR-09B $1K new. DS61 $799 new. MIDI pedal board $500. I also got an Onstage 2 level stand for them. $170.

        I'd suggest getting the VR-09 first, as there's plenty of honkin' can be done with just it.

        Oh, and I've bought two Roland K100 amps for less that $100 each around Atlanta.
        -- Hi, I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project -- 1899 Kimball, Rodgers W5000C, Roland DS-61/88, FA-06, VR-09B, Conn 643, Hammond M3, E112, and L-102, 8 Melodicas
        "If you're not depressed, you're not paying attention." Lancelot Evers

        Comment


        • Silken Path
          Silken Path commented
          Editing a comment
          The VR-09 also has a decent rotary sim with controls on the left hand.

      • #5
        Yes, I have B3X and I’m very pleased with it. It’s sample based vs. emulator based, so you get more of the real feeling, and the sampled Leslie sounds very realistic, and it has tons of options. It’s on the pricier side (and there are free alternatives), but I think it’s the best sounding of the ones that are available.

        Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
        Former: Yamaha E3R
        https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

        Comment


        • #6
          If budget is an issue why not start with a couple of simple MIDI keyboards and J-Organ. It's free and there are some Hammonds (one with a trumpet, guitar, and Sax) , church and theater organs, pianos, Rhodes, harpsichords, and synthesizers all free.
          td

          Comment


          • #7
            Thanks for all of the great suggestions above.

            I haven't had time to talk with at length the young guy yet, so I'm not sure if he's the type to want to fiddle around with MIDI and computer himself or if he'd want someone else (e.g. me) to do all of that for him.

            OTOH, if he prefers a turn-key solution, then I am quite impressed with the Roland VR-09B, both for its out-of-the-box capability and for the ability to add a 20 or 25 pedal board to it easily. It's priced well, too, and it's portable if he wants to gig with it.
            -------

            Hammond M-102 #21000.
            Leslie 147 #F7453.
            Hammond S-6 #72421

            Comment


            • #8
              Hammond T series - which should be free or thereabouts - if he's smart, he can get into doing the mods to make more of an 'older' Hammond sound.

              The clonewheels are well-priced but when you start adding in things like pedalboards, things spiral upwards. And the overall footprint of a MIDI set up or a full clonewheel set up will be similar to that model T, if not larger. So I'd think of it as a good, and cheap, starting point.

              If he takes to all sorts of organ as well as the Hammond sound, then virtual is the way to go. Free versions of Hauptwerk or Miditzer will do the pipes and any of the VST clones for the Hammond.
              It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

              New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

              Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
              Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
              Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
              Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by andyg View Post
                The clonewheels are well-priced but when you start adding in things like pedalboards, things spiral upwards.
                I won't get to have a detailed discussion with this young guy until July 4, when he and his mother are scheduled to meet me at my workshop. At that time I'll endeavor to determine whether he's going to be interested in putting together a PC-based solution, or not. I'll point out the pros and cons of that

                As I understand it, a Hammond T would not pass the father's objection to 'a big instrument', and it's not exactly luggable for a schoolboy who may want to play in a band with friends. And any repair work would be sent in my direction.

                Yes, adding pedals adds to the cost, however it also spreads the expense for the parents: pedals could be a Christmas gift, or whatever.

                Either way, there's also the need for powered speakers.
                -------

                Hammond M-102 #21000.
                Leslie 147 #F7453.
                Hammond S-6 #72421

                Comment

                Working...
                X