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Current value of a Leslie 130?

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  • Current value of a Leslie 130?

    Hi All,

    The short question: What is a Leslie 130 worth these days?

    I'm the proud owner of a number of Hammonds (eight at last count since I picked up an S6 yesterday), love the sound. Wife calls me a hoarder, with some justification :).

    Opening a music shop, repair and custom build facility in a building with a local music school as a semi-retirement past time. I've been a tech since any amplifier over 5 watts was a tube amp. Plan on putting one of my Hammonds out in the rehearsal room of the school to try to inspire the next Jimmy Smith :), or at least Stevie Winwood.

    The Hammond in my music room in our little apartment is a minty M3, $50 from Goodwill. Needs fresh caps, but it plays better than me :). But for all these great organs, I haven't scored a decent Leslie. I haven't had to pay more than $50 (and some sweat equity) for some very capable organs, but any real Leslie (with horns) I see has an asking price in excess of 4 times what I paid for all of my organs put together. Out of reach on a retiree budget. I really need two, one for my music room, and one for the rehearsal room in the music school, Something about a Hammond with a Leslie that goes for the soul.

    I've got a few cheesewheel assemblies from defunct lesser organs, and a few tube amps harvested from basket case organs. My plan, to fit a retiree budget, was to stick a cheesewheel and tube amp into an empty Leslie 715 cab I picked up for $5. Yeah, a poor excuse for a real Leslie, but better than what I have, which is nothing.

    Then I come across a Leslie 130 on OfferUp for $350. Sounds high to me for what is essentially a cheesewheel Leslie, a solid state amp, and a non-rotating tweeter. But it would be better than nothing, and save me the time and effort of kludging up something cheese-wheel.

    So what is a fair offer for a Leslie 130, and are there any better alternatives for getting something that sounds reasonably like a Leslie without paying the big bucks?

    Thanks in advance,
    Marty

  • #2
    Way too high. Value depends on where you are to some extent. Give us a location and someone will advise.

    And you already know that nothing is going to make 'the' sound that you want, short of a twin rotor leslie. I'd stick the cheesewheel in the 715 case with a crossover to send the bass to a static woofer. It would sound better than the 130 and you could just drive the speakers from the M's amp, no need for a tube amp in the leslie itself. If you shifted the upper shelf down, you could even put in two cheesewheels, contra-rotating!
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by andyg View Post
      Way too high. Value depends on where you are to some extent. Give us a location and someone will advise.

      And you already know that nothing is going to make 'the' sound that you want, short of a twin rotor leslie. I'd stick the cheesewheel in the 715 case with a crossover to send the bass to a static woofer. It would sound better than the 130 and you could just drive the speakers from the M's amp, no need for a tube amp in the leslie itself. If you shifted the upper shelf down, you could even put in two cheesewheels, contra-rotating!
      Andy, I like your way of thinking, when the original is too expensive, improvise and economize. I hadn't considered the impact of two counter-rotating wheels to emulate a real Leslie cab, I like it. Likely that is part of the effect.

      I do have a concern about trying to bounce enough high frequencies off of a styro-foam cheesewheel to emulate a horn. I always considered styro-foam to be more of a sound absorber than a reflector, especially above a few kHz. I wonder if anyone has tried putting a layer of something more reflective over the surface of the foam?

      I also wonder if I could install a Wurly Spectra-tone assembly mounted horizontally in the top of the Leslie 715 cabinet and mount a modern high efficiency midrange/tweeter out at the end of the Spectratone arm :). I might improve the fidelity, and not even need to lower the shelf for a Spectra-tone assembly?

      Comment


      • #4
        I like the idea of the Spectratone on the top shelf!

        Perhaps you could carefully glue some cooking foil over the inside part of the styrofoam drum. And then there would be a debate over whether it should be shiny side out or dull side out! :)
        It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

        New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

        Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
        Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
        Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
        Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

        Comment

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