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Price for Allen ADC-220?

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  • Price for Allen ADC-220?

    Hello All! Long time unregistered lurker, first time registered poster here... 😁

    I have an opportunity to purchase an Allen ADC-220 from an old mortuary that closed and was purchased and renovated into a meeting space by a non-profit. They do not have a use for it, but I definitely might, being an aspiring organist in desperate need of a home practice instrument. It was purchased in 84 and has been only been used sparingly. It's been well cared for (It's practically in new condition) and has sat unused for approximately the last 5 years. I was able to test it out, and all the keys, pedals, stops and pistons work. They have never had to have it serviced.

    I haven't asked what they would want to get out of it, but would anyone here have an idea of a fair price for this organ? Additionally, would there be any reason to avoid this model?

  • #2
    The brochure is posted on this page: https://organforum.com/gallery/thumb...&cat=0&page=13

    This is a very basic model, and it has "Princess" pedals--i.e., not AGO. Still, it is a serviceable model and OK for practice. Price should probably be less than $1,000 as a guess..

    Comment


    • novitiate_organist
      novitiate_organist commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Toodles! There isn't a large market for older electronic organs in the middle of Kansas. I've seen similar models go for anywhere from $100 - $800. I'll make them an offer and see what they come back with.

      Do you find difficulty moving between Princess pedals and AGO? I didn't notice an issue hitting the pedal notes, but I actually played it for all of 10 minutes after testing everything out. We have a new Rodgers Artist series at my parish (which is amazing BTW) and I don't need any help fudging up the pedal.

  • #3
    We have a 210 up in Ebay, while I posted an optimistic starting price, Around $1,000 is what we're hoping for.
    Can't play an note but love all things "organ" Responsible for 2/10 Wurli pipe organ, Allen 3160(wife's), Allen LL324, Allen GW319EX, ADC4600, many others. E-organ shop to fund free organ lessons for kids.

    Comment


  • #4
    That's ADC210
    Can't play an note but love all things "organ" Responsible for 2/10 Wurli pipe organ, Allen 3160(wife's), Allen LL324, Allen GW319EX, ADC4600, many others. E-organ shop to fund free organ lessons for kids.

    Comment


    • Organkeys Jones
      Organkeys Jones commented
      Editing a comment
      Is yours the 221 in NY?

  • #5
    Duh!!...thanks for jogging my memory it is the 221 that is ADC 221. Yes in New York state
    Can't play an note but love all things "organ" Responsible for 2/10 Wurli pipe organ, Allen 3160(wife's), Allen LL324, Allen GW319EX, ADC4600, many others. E-organ shop to fund free organ lessons for kids.

    Comment


    • #6
      The 220 is of course a basic model, with the essential stops represented throughout. When I sold Allen in the 80's we considered it a nice home organ, given the caveat of the princess pedals. It has almost exactly the same components inside as the fully AGO 420/520 series, and is capable of producing the same quality of sound. The stop list is typical Allen classic -- nice principal chorus up through mixture, generous flutes, a couple of strong reeds, a lovely string with its celeste, good chimes, a sturdy 16' pedal stop in two volume levels. Authentic couplers, though tremulants don't couple. Quite a bit of borrowing going on, but not nearly as bad as with older "unit" organs. Perfectly suitable for practice.

      As to the princess pedals, folks have different reactions. To some, there is no problem at all switching between princess and AGO. The difference in width of the entire pedalboard is only 2 or 3 inches, as I recall. For me, the biggest annoyance of the princess pedalboard is the small size of the sharps, but one can certainly get used to it with a little practice. And learn not to accidentally land on the expression pedal when aiming for pedal keys in the middle of the range!

      Allen has now come out with a new option for compact pedals called the "parallel/concave" style. This new pedalboard is exactly the same width as princess pedals at the point where it connects to the console, but instead of narrowing toward the rear, the pedal sticks remain parallel. The result is that the spacing of the pedal sticks in the area in which your feet fall is exactly identical to the AGO pedalboard. The sharp keys are bigger too. This design feels far more like playing AGO, and apparently a lot of players are 100% satisfied with it as an alternative to AGO. It still takes up less space than real AGO, making it suitable for smaller spaces.

      Not sure if Allen can supply a retrofit pedalboard for a 220 or 221. It would be nice of them to do so, but it would likely be expensive. You have to have a wider bench as well for this pedalboard to work. So, probably not an option for you. Just a side note...
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • novitiate_organist
        novitiate_organist commented
        Editing a comment
        Thank you, Jbird604! I have a few additional questions, if you can help...

        How does the pedal board connect? I haven't been able to find much in the way of info on how to remove the pedal board for moving.

        I would assume that I could "midify" this instrument (with hardware from Artisan, MIDI gadgets boutique, etc...) somewhat easily. Have you found this to be the case with ADC organs without MIDI capability?

        The old Allen Digital 32 MOS-1 that our parish replaced had SAM stop tabs. After it was replaced, what worked was parted out to a dealer and what was left is in storage, which includes the stop rail. If I chose the MIDIfy route, could I theoretically re-use the SAM's so the pistons wouldn't be blind? (The Allen met with an unfortunate electrical accident and developed a mind of it's own. It was going to be extremely expensive to repair, so we chose to invest in a new instrument).

      • jbird604
        jbird604 commented
        Editing a comment
        The pedal board on the 220 operates the same as on all Allen organs built since about 1970 -- magnetically. The pedal board is not wired to the console in any way. The end of each pedal key has a magnet, and the magnets are lined up with reed switches enclosed in the brown or gray plastic switch housing mounted on the console itself. The pedals are held in place by some small "notches" in the sides of the console, in which little matching "bumps" on the pedal board rest.

        To remove the pedals, simply lift the pedals up about a inch and pull straight back away from the console. To re-install, just push the pedal board back into place, guiding the little "bumps" into their "notches." Very simple, quite foolproof. The only thing to consider is that the floor underneath the console and under the pedals and bench needs to be pretty near perfectly flat and level. If the floor is not flat and level, or if the console is placed on a thick carpet or pad, the pedals may not properly line up with the reed switches, resulting in pedal notes either not playing at all or else all of them trying to play at once. If you have that kind of trouble, try adding some coasters under the front corners of the console, to raise it off the floor a tad, thus giving the pedal board a better chance of properly settling into those notches.

        As to adding MIDI -- if you want to preserve the ability to play the existing Allen voices, you may be forced to find one of the Allen MIDI translator kits. These were made specifically to MIDI-fy ADC models, providing a simple note on/note off MIDI stream. Downside is that this kit is very pricey if bought new from Allen. But there might be one on the used market somewhere.

        Or, if you plan to kill the Allen voices anyway, you can strip away the existing matrix arrangement on the key contact switches and use whatever matrix your new adapter requires, if any. Unfortunately, because the Allen circuitry scans the keys in a proprietary fashion, you can't wire any kind of ordinary MIDI interface to the key contacts while the Allen system is still attached to them. But the Allen key contacts are certainly nice ones -- heavy duty industrial leaf switches that should last for a lifetime.

        You'll have to inquire of someone more experienced in the art of MIDI conversion about using the old SAMs in a MIDI application. They are probably very good ones, though depending on the type of capture action your old Allen had, they could be designed to work only with an Allen capture memory board such as the "DM" system. Very old SAMs from Allen though are more generic. Those that were used with the old "sequential" capture board are adaptable to anybody else's system, though they do require quite a bit of power to drive the magnets.

      • novitiate_organist
        novitiate_organist commented
        Editing a comment
        Outstanding! Thank you for your expertise, it's much appreciated!
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