Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gordon Young: Prelude in Classic Style

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Menschenstimme View Post
    I need to find my Gordon Young book that I bought in the early 1970s and hope that this piece is in it.
    Originally posted by nullogik View Post
    Finally, does anyone know what publication I can find this Gordon Young piece in? He appears to have written several "Trumpet Voluntarys" so I don't really want to buy several books to find the right one
    It isn't in any Gordon Young book that I've found. Only available as sheet music from Sacred Music Press. I have two copies that I had lost until recently. Found them mixed in with the Organ/Brass concert music I'm organizing. Guess I thought it would be nice with a real trumpet?

    Michael
    Last edited by myorgan; 07-02-2011, 01:24 PM. Reason: Reply multiple quotes.
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by gsneide View Post
      I like many of Gordon Young's pieces, but somehow I missed that one. I was able to D/L the sheet music for Prelude in Classic Style at http://www.organmusiconly.com/pdf/lorenz-70_1330l.pdf
      It's FREE!
      At the risk of cross-posting what I've posted elsewhere, let me include my review of both versions side-by-side. I would NEVER RECOMMEND the arrangement--even though it is free. It reminds me of the old addage, "You get what you pay for."

      In comparing the original to the arrangement (side-by-side), I made the following observations (in addition to those already noted by otheres):
      • The arranger has suggested an organ registration, which is really only suitable for that one particular purpose. The composer left the registration open to the musician--a suggestion I once heard by a musician at the Dayton Church Music Workshop.
      • In the original, the pedal repeats on every beat rather than 1st and 3rd only. This moves the piece forward better in contrast with the repeated 8th note chords in the LH.
      • Some of the scale runs were only 1 note or in octaves, when they should have been parallel 6ths, 10ths, or octaves, and are much more interesting that way.
      • Essential rhythms are changed, for example, in the runs at the end which are supposed to be all 16th notes, and some are changed to a weird 8th+16th+16th note pattern (correction from my other post).
      • When the melody moves from the solo line to all on the Great, the repeated 8th notes in the LH of the piece are entirely missing. The LH chords continue repeating, totally missing the paralled 3rds and 6ths, thereby resulting in missing articulation required by the original written phrase.
      • When the melody moves from the solo line to all on the Great, the arranger missed the fact that while the final note of the melody is written as a 5th, the bottom note is to be played on the Great--NOT the solo line as the arranger has indicated.
      • Overall, it lacks the pizzaz of the original.
      Personally, I found the original to be easy to learn (with proper fingering on the scales), and is much more pleasing than the arrangement--there's just too much left out or altered for it to be considered to be like the original. It is clearly a derivative work, and probably shouldn't even carry the original name (false advertising). I'm sure I missed something, but don't want to continue beating a dead horse.

      In this case, there is no substitute for the original by Gordon Young, published by Sacred Music Press. Gary, Sorry I couldn't be more positive about the free arrangement. Thank you for your resourcefulness in finding the arrangement, though. It put me onto some possible Brass Quintet/Organ arrangements, for which I've been searching as possible literature for a concert.

      Michael

      P.S. I do feel bad offering this review of the arrangement, especially as a former member of the Dayton AGO and knew the parties involved. They normally do good work, but missed the target in this case.:-(

      P.P.S. I also have the Organ/Flute Duet, and Piano/Organ Duet versions of this piece, and they adhere more closely to the original. I haven't performed either yet, but believe I can recommend them based on what I've seen in them.
      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
      • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

      Comment


      • #18
        Gordon Young Classic Prelude

        I learned this wonderful Prelude in 1977, and played it flawlessly to open services at the Grace Congregational Church in Rutland, Vermont on May 21, 1978. What strikes me most since finding it on the Internet a few months ago is the tempo at which nearly all others I see and hear detracting to/from the composer's intent. My rendition ran over seven minutes, and was whined, wheeled, and fully squirtified by the the master organist there before I was allowed to present it. We worked out the registration together; I have no recollection of what it exactly was, though at the end it took utmost restraint not to simply hit the sForzando button and give them all a blast of full organ!

        What I see online is rushed, inaccurate, and adulterated interpretations~~ none have played this piece as I learned it in a dark,yet almost surreal, chapel in South Kent, Ct. over the course of a few days I was there. I wanted to call it the South Kent Prelude in C, but I couldn't put any words into Gordon Young's mouth. Only recently did I come to know of it as the "Classic Prelude."

        Slow down now! Hold ya hawses! I learned a total of five segmentations, the first simple tonic, then another using the major 7th, which then transitions to the third C minor component. Following the cadence of this passage, it resumes in C major, with a final movement returning to the C7, the G-major scale progression, to culminate in climatic chord sequence bringing the piece toa close.

        I played all carrying melody on the Great, with harmony on the Swell, until the final movement, where I moved everything to the Great. The contrast of doing this was spectacular.

        Try this at a larghetto~~ you may find yourself pleasantly surprised --:)*

        Enjoy.

        Comment


        • #19
          Douggieboy,

          First things first--welcome to the Forum!
          Originally posted by Douggieboy View Post
          What I see online is rushed, inaccurate, and adulterated interpretations~~ none have played this piece as I learned it in a dark,yet almost surreal, chapel in South Kent, Ct.
          I agree that most renditions I hear are performed rather rapidly and rushed. Perhaps that's a testament to how easy the piece is to learn and play.

          However, I'm not sure I'd go as far as you do to the other end of the metronome. When I play the piece, I tend to keep the piece upbeat (not fast), and rather crisp and perhaps a bit "jaunty." I think of it is a playful piece, and it's never failed to receive a positive response from the listeners.

          Unfortunately, my first YouTube video was of this piece and was recorded by a co-worker. It was of a practice session where I had just sat down at a pipe organ I'd never played before. So many mistakes, and it sounded perfectly AWFUL!!! I do wish I could remove it, but it's under his account!X-(

          Oh, well. I guess it's time for me to bite the bullet and record some better organ videos for YouTube!:-P

          Again, welcome to the Forum.

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by nullogik View Post
            Finally, does anyone know what publication I can find this Gordon Young piece in? He appears to have written several "Trumpet Voluntarys" so I don't really want to buy several books to find the right one
            The piece in that video is "Trumpet Voluntary (after an Old English Dance)." It's in the Gordon Young volume "Twelve Compositions for Organ" (1978; published by Harold Flammer)

            Comment


            • #21
              There is a rather excellent Trumpet and Organ recording by Douglas Bush and David Brown.
              www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00366564U

              Comment

              Working...
              X