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Pastorale pour deux orgues expressifs

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  • SubBase
    replied
    This is a recording I made of a duet for two harmoniums by Richard Strauss. I restored and tuned both instruments. (440)
    https://youtu.be/SHxq_S0stN4
    Casey

    Leave a comment:


  • Liben
    replied
    Originally posted by regeron View Post
    It's important to take into account the history of "standard pitch". Here's part of an article from Wikipedia:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A440_(pitch_standard)

    "History and use
    Prior to the standardization on 440 Hz, many countries and organizations followed the French standard since the 1860s of 435 Hz, which had also been the Austrian government's 1885 recommendation. Johann Heinrich Scheibler recommended A440 as a standard in 1834 after inventing the "tonometer" to measure pitch, and it was approved by the German Natural History Society the same year.

    The American music industry reached an informal standard of 440 Hz in 1926, and some began using it in instrument manufacturing. In 1936 the American Standards Association recommended that the A above middle C be tuned to 440 Hz. This standard was taken up by the International Organization for Standardization in 1955 (reaffirmed by them in 1975) as ISO 16."

    I've been in a room with multiple reed organs/ harmoniums and only certain ones could be played together. Some pairs or organs were 'close' and some were simply painful. Considering that most American reed organs were made prior to the 1926 standard, it's no surprise that there is such diversity of pitch.
    Indeed the history of tuning is of great importance. Possibly the fact that it was difficult to pair together harmoniums with close enough tuning is why there are so few duets composed for them. The 1885 instrument is in 440 and it says D.N alongside the serial nr. The instrument from 1852 is not yet fully restored and playable so it will be interesting to find out its actual tuning. There is also a D.N marking in this instrument which I guess suggests 440 as well. I will let you know how it goes! :)

    Leave a comment:


  • regeron
    replied
    It's important to take into account the history of "standard pitch". Here's part of an article from Wikipedia:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A440_(pitch_standard)

    "History and use
    Prior to the standardization on 440 Hz, many countries and organizations followed the French standard since the 1860s of 435 Hz, which had also been the Austrian government's 1885 recommendation. Johann Heinrich Scheibler recommended A440 as a standard in 1834 after inventing the "tonometer" to measure pitch, and it was approved by the German Natural History Society the same year.

    The American music industry reached an informal standard of 440 Hz in 1926, and some began using it in instrument manufacturing. In 1936 the American Standards Association recommended that the A above middle C be tuned to 440 Hz. This standard was taken up by the International Organization for Standardization in 1955 (reaffirmed by them in 1975) as ISO 16."

    I've been in a room with multiple reed organs/ harmoniums and only certain ones could be played together. Some pairs or organs were 'close' and some were simply painful. Considering that most American reed organs were made prior to the 1926 standard, it's no surprise that there is such diversity of pitch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Liben
    replied
    Originally posted by Leisesturm View Post
    Just out of curiosity... how does one perform a work written for two harmoniums?
    It will be a challenge surely! However, just imagine the sound of something as wonderful as two Alexandre Père et Fils instruments! :D Will be interesting though with the tuning, but they are both supposed to be normally tuned. One instrument is from 1885 the other is from 1852.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Originally posted by regeron View Post
    Two harmoniums (harmonia?) close enough that we can see the whites of each other's eyes. You play one; I play the other.

    If you have octopus in your genes, you might be able to manage both instruments on your own. :-)
    Hahaha.. nevertheless, there is actually a new piece composed for two players on one harmonium, which is also possible to play solo. I think it must be easier than to be two on one instrument :)!

    Leave a comment:


  • regeron
    replied
    Originally posted by Leisesturm View Post
    Just out of curiosity... how does one perform a work written for two harmoniums?
    Two harmoniums (harmonia?) close enough that we can see the whites of each other's eyes. You play one; I play the other.

    If you have octopus in your genes, you might be able to manage both instruments on your own. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Leisesturm
    replied
    Just out of curiosity... how does one perform a work written for two harmoniums?

    Leave a comment:


  • fffaaa
    replied
    Originally posted by samibe View Post
    I'm not sure if it is public domain but you could probably submit it to IMSLP and see if they know differently.
    Thanks samibe; as long as IMPSL legal structure and accounting keep being opaque, I prefer not to submit any score there.

    If anyone wants it, drop me a PM!
    Last edited by fffaaa; 02-27-2018, 11:30 AM. Reason: foxed link

    Leave a comment:


  • samibe
    replied
    I'm not sure if it is public domain but you could probably submit it to IMSLP and see if they know differently.

    http://imslp.org/wiki/IMSLP:Copyright_Made_Simple
    http://imslp.org/wiki/IMSLP:Contributing_scores
    http://imslp.org/wiki/IMSLP:Score_submission_guide

    It looks like you have to set up an account to submit a score and I'm not sure if it costs anything to register, but it might be worth looking into.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peterboroughdiapason
    replied
    Originally posted by fffaaa View Post
    PM Sent!

    Does anyone know if this is considered Public Domain?
    If so I can share with everyone.
    The music certainly is, but if it's a recent edition (within the last 25 years) then the edition/engraving won't be - at least in the UK

    Leave a comment:


  • fffaaa
    replied
    PM Sent!

    Does anyone know if this is considered Public Domain?
    If so I can share with everyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Liben
    replied
    Fantastic! :D let me know when you have got it! I'm so looking forward to performing the music :D

    Leave a comment:


  • fffaaa
    replied
    Originally posted by Liben View Post
    That would be so fantastic! If you would do this wonderful deed, could you perhaps also ask if they have any harmonium scores by Charlotte Dreyfus?
    Very many thanks to you!
    They say they sent it just now! B-)

    Now we want your rendition! :P

    Leave a comment:


  • Liben
    replied
    That would be so fantastic! If you would do this wonderful deed, could you perhaps also ask if they have any harmonium scores by Charlotte Dreyfus?
    Very many thanks to you!

    Leave a comment:


  • fffaaa
    replied
    Originally posted by Liben View Post
    Thanks! I tried to contact this library a long while ago and still no reply, but I guess it's still the best option so far.
    I am Italian, if you want I can try to phone them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Liben
    replied
    Thanks Michael! Yes, no luck there unfortunately :S

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