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What is the name of this?

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  • What is the name of this?

    Hi! I would like to know the
    name of this piece. Thank you very much!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtBb...BbroYH3S4&t=46
    Last edited by Admin; 03-14-2018, 06:37 AM. Reason: Fixed title

  • #2
    Beckmesser,

    Welcome to the Forum. I hope you continue to participate here.

    While I can't name the particular piece, perhaps we can narrow it down through process of elimination. Because it is harmonic in structure and doesn't use ground bass, we can probably rule out most Medieval music. It is also polyphonic in nature and ends with a Picardy third, so I would suspect it is from the Renaissance era. Because the piece is being played on a continuo organ, one would also need to include harpsichord/piano music from that era.

    Composers who come to mind are: Palestrina, Sweelinck, de Lassus, Gabrieli, Praetorius, Scheidt, etc. For countries, the Italian, Dutch, and German composers come to mind. I would rule out French and Spanish composers because the style in those countries varied greatly from those I mentioned.

    Now that we've narrowed it down to hundreds of composers, good luck finding the actual piece of music! We have some specialists on the Forum. I'll see if they can weigh in on the thread too. Meanwhile, your best bet is probably to contact the manufacturer of the organ to ask the name of the piece used to demonstrate the instrument.

    Again, welcome to the Forum.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd say that it's too modern for Renaissance and would put it at Baroque. Agreed that it doesn't sound French or Spanish and would add that it doesn't sound Italian. I'd place it in Germany somewhere or at least German influence.

      Comment


      • #4
        JS Bach C Minor Partita 3rd movement.
        It is mentioned at the beginning

        Comment


        • #5
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtBb...BbroYH3S4&t=46
          is the music in question.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyWI...=RDLtBbroYH3S4
          is the next video in the mix of continuo organs. This video has "JS Bach C Minor Partita 3rd movement" mentioned at the beginning of the video. The organist is actually playing individual movements from Bachs' Partita on "O Gott, du frommer Gott" BWV 767. In my Barenreiter edition, each movement is referred to as a Partita, beginning with the theme as Partita I. The organist plays Partitas IV, III, VI, then repeats IV using the Flöte 4'.

          The first video, the one mentioned by the original poster, is not part of this Partita. I checked the other Choralpartitas and it doesn't seem to be from one of them either. So, the original question remains to be answered.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi everyone! Thank you very much for your welcome remarks and thanks for the possible answers. Indeed, as Regeron points out, it is not about the video of the Partita in C minor but of the previous video. For its technical aspects I would opt for Germany or Italy at the beginning of the 18th century. Thank you very much everyone for your answers and we are still waiting for a definitive answer. Best regards.

            Comment


            • #7
              I just spent some time looking for the piece, and so far have only found the same recording on the Klop website: https://klop.info/en/portfolio/chest-organ/
              Here, the piece is called "Sonate 117 in g kleine terts (3)" (g kleine terts = g minor). However, most search engines will only direct you to Gabriel Fauré when looking for a g minor sonata with the number 117 :embarrassed:

              You could just contact Klop in the Netherlands and ask :-) I will ask one of my organ friends in the Netherlands, too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by regeron View Post
                I'd say that it's too modern for Renaissance and would put it at Baroque. Agreed that it doesn't sound French or Spanish and would add that it doesn't sound Italian. I'd place it in Germany somewhere or at least German influence.
                I'm going to change my mind a bit about the Italian part. The more I listen, the more I hear an Italian concerto or sonata, transcribed by a German for a single manual keyboard.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by regeron View Post
                  I'm going to change my mind a bit about the Italian part. The more I listen, the more I hear an Italian concerto or sonata, transcribed by a German for a single manual keyboard.
                  One of the Scarlattis?

                  Michael
                  Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                  • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                  • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                  • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by myorgan View Post
                    One of the Scarlattis?

                    Michael
                    I wondered that, too, but having played a lot of Scarlatti, it just doesn't sound like him. It sounds more like a Vivaldi-style instrumental piece, transferred to keyboard. The sequences make me think this, as well as the final cadence..

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by regeron View Post
                      The sequences make me think this, as well as the final cadence..
                      I noticed those as well, leading me to believe my initial assessment of Renaissance wasn't correct. Definitely Baroque or later.

                      In viewing the performer's other posts on *ouTube, he seems partial to the works of Soler and CPE Bach, so I wondered if it was one of them, but no dice. My curiosity is definitely piqued!

                      Michael
                      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                      • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The composer's name is Bernardo Pasquini and the piece is from one of the sonatas for double basso continuo.

                        The sheet music is not on imslp, I already checked. But there's at least one version available by a German publisher: http://www.bodensee-musikversand.de/...ucts_id=236871

                        I would like to thank my dear friend Hans who knows one of the people who played the piece and helped me to obtain this information to share with you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by andijah View Post
                          The composer's name is Bernardo Pasquini and the piece is from one of the sonatas for double basso continuo.

                          The sheet music is not on imslp, I already checked. But there's at least one version available by a German publisher: http://www.bodensee-musikversand.de/...ucts_id=236871

                          I would like to thank my dear friend Hans who knows one of the people who played the piece and helped me to obtain this information to share with you.
                          Excellent detective work, Andrea. Thank you so much for finding it!

                          So I WAS close--late Renaissance/Early Baroque. I checked out a couple of his other compositions on IMSLP, and found 1 or 2 that used ground bass, as well as sequences with ornamentation. I might just have to use some of his works sometime.

                          Thanks again for sharing.

                          Michael
                          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                          • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi everyone!, thank you very much for all the answers and searches that this question has raised. At last the answer has been given !. Many thanks to Andrea and her friend Hans for having found the answer. Best regards!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Beckmesser View Post
                              Hi everyone!, thank you very much for all the answers and searches that this question has raised. At last the answer has been given !. Many thanks to Andrea and her friend Hans for having found the answer. Best regards!
                              Wait, don't go!!!

                              Never underestimate the power of crowd sourcing with this group! They're a great bunch. I hope you continue participating in the Forum.

                              Michael
                              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                              • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                              Comment

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