Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Beginners music

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Beginners music

    What would be good for a person with no piano experience?

  • #2
    Re: Beginners music



    Others here will disagree, but my very strong recommendation is to firststart onpiano. [:)]</P>


    It also depends on your expectations. If you only want to play hymns and simple tunes perhaps you can skip the piano.</P>


    But for anything more advanced, you need to develop your technique at the piano.</P>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Beginners music

      [quote user="soubasse32"]

      Others here will disagree, but my very strong recommendation is to firststart onpiano. [:)]</p>


      It also depends on your expectations. If you only want to play hymns and simple tunes perhaps you can skip the piano.</p>


      But for anything more advanced, you need to develop your technique at the piano.</p>

      [/quote]</p>

      I agree 100%.</p>

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Beginners music

        Now, I've never played a piano and just went straight into organ. I do play 2 other intstruments.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Beginners music



          Schoenstein:</p>

          It is quite possible to go right into organ with little or no piano practice, but there is a cost. You are going to take a lot longer learning things than piano organ majors who've done their manual technique practice. You do have some advantages in that you don't have to break years upon years of bad habbits, but it will still take a LOT of practice. You'll start to feel pretty stupid after you've worked on the same bloody orgelbuchlein chorale for three months, but you do get there.</p>

          </p>

          It's possible to do, but I would reccomend at bare minnimum the ability to pass a college piano profeciency (play a simple hymn chorale at sight, harmonize melodies, scales etc.)</p>

          It'll save you (some) harsh effort in the long run.</p>

          Organ is like no other instrument you've ever played; I can almost guarentee that.</p>

          </p>

          If you still wish to pursue it, I would start out with a children's technique guide to playing the organ of some sort. I'm sure another member of the forum can reccomend which ones to go with.</p>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Beginners music

            I take lessons, I'm working on Pachelbels Toccata in E major, P&amp;F in C major(Bach(, and mvt.1 symphony no.6(Widor). That sounds good for a beginner, right?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Beginners music



              What other instruments do you play? How long have you been taking lessons?</p>

              </p>

              I don't want to sound doubtful, but if you're just starting out on any keyboard instrument I find it unlikely that your teacher would begin you on those pieces. I don't think we're talking beginning in the normal sense here if that's what you're working on.</p>

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Beginners music

                I play euphonium and trumpet. I've had 3 lessons so far. Why wouldn't she start me on those pieces?The piece by Widor is the hardest(to me) by far, but I practice that at the end of each class, after I've played everything else.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Beginners music



                  The Widor is nearly too difficult for advanced players!</P>


                  I like your enthusiasm and certainly don't want to discourage you, but I am concerned.</P>


                  Ihave many years of teaching experience and can say with some authority thatyou - or anyone - would risk a lot by doing pieces that are too difficult, too soon. Better to build a solid foundation of technique, so your playing will be effortless and as close to perfection as possible.</P>


                  Of course, you can do as you please... but I hope you will trust me on this point. [:)]</P>

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Beginners music

                    [quote user="soubasse32"]


                    The Widor is nearly too difficult for advanced players!</P>


                    I like your enthusiasm and certainly don't want to discourage you, but I am concerned.</P>


                    Ihave many years of teaching experience and can say with some authority thatyou - or anyone - would risk a lot by doing pieces that are too difficult, too soon. Better to build a solid foundation of technique, so your playing will be effortless and as close to perfection as possible.</P>


                    Of course, you can do as you please... but I hope you will trust me on this point. [:)]</P>


                    [/quote]</P>


                    I only play parts of the Widor piece. Just for fun. The first 5 pages(I have a 15 page score)and somewhere near the middle. I do practice chords at the beginning of the lessons, then we move on to some pieces. I am just wondering, why are you concerned. Is it bad to start like this? </P>


                    With other pieces, I just play orgelbuchlein. You really know what you're talking about. How long have you been playing?</P>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Beginners music



                      [quote user="schoenstein-organist"]You really know what you're talking about. How long have you been playing?[/quote]Why thank you! I've been playing a very long time. [:D]</P>


                      HereI am atmy first organ lesson:</P>


                      </P>


                      I said I was concerned, only because you might be learning bad habits which will be difficult to undo later.</P>


                      It is sort of like a weightlifter trying to lift the maximum weight, without doing all the training first. Muscles need to be trained properly - especially the tiny muscles in the hand.</P>


                      I recommend some piano exercises, such as the "School of Velocity" by Czerny. Properly learning major &amp; minor scales and arpeggios is a must! I base my solid technique on myyears of practicingscales - believe it or not.</P>


                      A good teacher is indespensable.</P>


                      Having said all that, it is OK to have a little bit of fun with Widor. [:)] Just make sure you are spending enough time on technique building, rather than just playing "at" the organ.</P>

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Beginners music

                        Hey, that's MY TEACHER!!! I've alreadyworked on alotarpeggios and scales.(not to say I've mastered them, far from it) I tried teaching myself for amonth before the lessons. I have to say it was good and bad. I'm still trying to break those habbits. By the way, you sounded <U>GREAT</U> at st sulpice. I hope to play there someday. Only 30 seconds and I'll be happy for.....who knows how long. Thanks M.Soubasse.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Beginners music



                          I agree with what has been said. </P>


                          I started on the piano first and then progressed to the organ, and I can say that without the experience from playing the piano it would have made learning the organ twice as difficult. It really makes life so much easier if you hone you're keyboard skills to an acceptable level (as well as sight-reading skills) before attempting to tackle the organ.</P>


                          I'm also slightly concerned that you're already trying Widor's Toccata - even some experienced organists find this piece a challenge. Its just that at your skill level I feel that frustration might set in that its taking you so long to learn a small passage from the Widor - which might make you loose patience with the organ and leave you discouraged from learning. I freely admit, that sometimes hard pieces which can take me a year to learn, can really test my patience and can get me irritated - sometimes it can take me weeks just to get a couple of bars correct.</P>


                          Its far better to start with simple stuff and build up, and you'll feel like you've achieved something if you've learnt a complete piece (even if its easy)rather than"bits and pieces" from a much harder piece. The easy piece will also be of more use to you - you could play it at a service, instead of excerpts from Widor's Toccata which would serve no purpose at all.</P>


                          I think what I'm saying is learn to walk first before you run. There is plenty of time to learn Widor's Toccata etc., but get all you're necessary skills in place and iron out those bad habits. You'll find that when you really come to tackle Widor's Toccata it'll be much easier (and quicker) to learn.</P>


                          I regret not eliminating my bad habits from the beginning, but I taught myself and didn't know otherwise. It was years later till I had proper lessons and despite my teacher going on about it constantly a lot of these bad habits would not die. Consequently, these bad habits come back to haunt me sometimes when I tackle harder pieces - don't make the same mistake.</P>
                          1971 Allen Organ TC-3S (#42904) w/sequential capture system.
                          Speakers: x1 Model 100 Gyro, x1 Model 105 & x3 Model 108.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Beginners music



                            nullogik, he said he was learning the first movement of Widor's Sixth Symphony - not the Toccata.</P>


                            The Toccata is relatively easy (same pattern nearly throughout), compared to the first movement of theSixth! It is a technical minefield, culminating in that horrible pedal cadenza (doubled in both hands). The pedal part is quite active throughout; there are parallel thirds to condend with in the RH part, among other things.</P>


                            The piece is not for the faint of heart, or weak of finger &amp; foot. [:)]</P>

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Beginners music

                              <DIV>I've actually tried the toccata, and I find it harder.(though I'm not too far into mvt.1 of his 6th).In the 6ththere is one part in the pedal that is unbelievable!!!
                              <P mce_keep="true"></P>


                              Can you play it Soubasse?(I'm not doubting that you can). Where can I find a free, and good recording?</P></DIV>

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X