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  • #16
    Originally posted by Peterboroughdiapason View Post
    I think your list is brilliant but my problem is that there are so many names! IMSLP is not very helpful in that it's often not obvious which collections/pieces are for organ.
    IMSLP's search function is quite robust. It allows you to search by instrument followed by composer.

    You can also search the site by putting in the composer and name of a piece. For example, if you are searching for "Boëllmann, Elevation" on the IMSLP site, it will give you all of the pieces titled "Elevation" from various sources, i.e. "2 Petites Pièces pour orgue," "Heures mystiques" etc.

    While it is still a bit cumbersome, it does make finding the needle in the haystack a bit easier.

    Bill

    My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

    Comment


    • Peterboroughdiapason
      Peterboroughdiapason commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, Voet - I hadn't investigated that! You learn something new every day - even at my age.

      I'd still like any recommendations that come to mind, andija. Most of these names are unknown to me. Anything more extended and/or adventurous?

  • #17
    Extended and/or adventurous and on IMSLP... I'll think about it.

    Comment


    • #18
      Originally I posted this information in General Chat, because it is not, strictly speaking, about women and the organ. However, andijah responded to that post:

      I think this posting would be a nice addition to the women and organ topic.

      Speaking of the type of music that was written in the baroque era: indeed women composed, but organ music doesn't seem to exist. I can think of various reasons for this. Church, for a very long time, was a male domain and so was the organ. There are some nuns who wrote for organ, but not many pieces survived.
      However, a lot of harpsichord music can be played on the organ and I do this regularly.
      So, in response to her suggestion, here is the text of my original post:

      Women Composers of Baroque Music

      Yesterday, 11:04 AM

      Here is another interesting video from Alice M. Chuaqui Baldwin. I am posting this in General Chat because it is not about composers of organ music. However, because of the interest in the sticky topic "Women and the organ," I thought some members might like to know about this. Some of the women mentioned in the video have written harpsichord music, but none have written music for the organ, as far as I know.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYTS3YEpDu8



      Bill

      My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

      Comment


      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        Maybe I'm all wet on this, but isn't most Baroque harpsichord music also compatible for playing on the organ? I seem to remember that most organists of the time were also harpsichord players.

        If that is the case, I wouldn't hesitate to post harpsichord music by women composers in the thread that already exists. But that's just me....

        Michael

      • JeffW
        JeffW commented
        Editing a comment
        Regarding the compatibility of Baroque harpsichord music being played on the organ, Barbara Owen notes in her wonderful book "The Registration of Baroque Organ Music" that starting around 1650 the "line of demarcation between the style of writing for the organ and for stringed keyboard instruments became sharper..." But having heard good recordings of Domenico Scarlatti sonatas on organ, I think each Baroque keyboard composition is a candidate for consideration as an organ piece especially if there's no instrument indication in the score.

    • #19
      I see that the RCO and The Society of Woman Organists in the UK has designated this Sunday as "Woman Composer Sunday". Sadly, I've discovered this too late as I've already sent in my recorded voluntary. There is a link here: RCO News: ‘Woman Composer Sunday’ launched by RCO & Society of Women Organists and you can download a list of pieces from the page.

      Comment


      • #20
        I listened to this recital live on youtube
        https://youtu.be/UIiTVAifUvU
        and it was really good. I have several of the pieces in my repertoire, too, so it was wonderful to hear them being played by such a great organist on a nice instrument.

        Comment


        • myorgan
          myorgan commented
          Editing a comment
          A fuchsia Mary!!! Some of the pieces were very nice. It's too bad none are available on IMSLP.

          Michael

      • #21
        Several aren't public domain (yet). The organist used a collection of Schott music publishers (among others) that isn't too expensive (around 35 euros) and well worth buying. However, some of the pieces in that collection are quite difficult.

        Comment


        • #22
          A recital of organ music by women for International Women's Day by Katherine Dienes-Williams.
          -Admin

          Allen 965
          Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
          Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
          Hauptwerk 4.2

          Comment


          • andijah
            andijah commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, I should've said more about the link I posted earlier - it's the one I listened to :-)

        • #23
          By the way, I posted an excerpt from a piece by Betty Jackson King on Twitter yesterday and someone was so inspired by it that they went and bought the sheet music. :-)
          I love it when I can help people discover new music.

          Comment


          • #24
            There was an interesting interview of Lara Downes on National Public Radio this morning. She highlights the works of overlooked and forgotten compositions by Black artists in the classical music tradition. For Women's History month, she "focuses on some overlooked and under-appreciated bodies of work by women composers and performers." Here is a link to the segment:

            https://www.npr.org/sections/decepti...lack-composers

            Because Downes is a classical pianist, she focuses on works for her instrument. However, one of the featured composers is Florence Price, who did write for the organ. I wondered if either of the other two featured people wrote for the organ. Unfortunately, I could not find Hazel Scott or Nora Douglas Holt on IMSLP.

            I also found a recording of music by African-American woman that featured 14 composers.

            https://www.leonarda.com/le339.html

            Sadly of the 14 composers only Florence Price appears on IMSLP. As difficult as it is for women to be recognized for their accomplishments in the musical world, it seems even more so for women of color. I appreciate the efforts of everyone who has contributed to this thread to address that unfortunate situation.
            Bill

            My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

            Comment


            • #25
              Although Julliard educated as a classical pianist, I think Hazel Scott is primarily remembered today for her jazz work.
              -Admin

              Allen 965
              Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
              Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
              Hauptwerk 4.2

              Comment


              • #26
                A lot of 20th (and 21st) century music isn't on IMSLP (yet) due to copyright issues. For example, in Germany, only works by composers who died more than 70 years ago are considered public domain. For others, you have to pay a fee when you perform their works in a recital. Service use of the music is usually free. But unless the composer makes the sheet music available under a creative commons license (as Carlotta Ferrari does), you will have to go and buy the sheet music from a publisher.

                Regarding works by female BIPoC composers, there are several to be found in the "African American Organ Music Anthology" series by Morning Star Publishers.
                The music by Betty Jackson King is available here: https://www.bettyjacksonking.com/

                Here's a list of composers of African descent, including several women: http://chevalierdesaintgeorges.homes...om/Others.html

                And I'd hope that our forum member DEWII who wrote a few very informative posts on composers already could tell us a bit more.

                Maybe we could have a separate discussion on works by BIPoC composers and composers e.g. from Asia (there are a few, too, but research isn't always straighforward.)

                Comment


                • myorgan
                  myorgan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Andrea,

                  I've looked back in the thread and can't seem to find out what BlPoC means. Please enlighten me.

                  Michael

                • andijah
                  andijah commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Ah, sorry, I thought it was a common term.
                  Black, Indigenous, People of Colour.

                • myorgan
                  myorgan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thank you. I wondered, but didn't want to assume–we all know what that does!;-)

                  Michael

              • #27
                Thanks for the referral, andijah, I hope that I can make a contribution of substance to the conversation.

                I'll start by saying that my graduate work is in musicology, so my approach to the problem at hand is going to be very scholarly. Don't let that deter you. Anyone can do this work, and it's all the more meaningful when a layman takes it up.

                We first have to acknowledge that BIPoC composers, by and large, are already pushed to the side. Female composers of bygone eras also suffered this same fate. This would have been two strikes against the widespread publication and dissemination of their works. (Interestingly, Florence Price's letter to BSO conductor Serge Koussevitzky opens with this conjecture). This will largely, but not totally, close that avenue off to your searching. That doesn't mean to not search here at all.

                Here are some steps you can take:
                • If you know the composer to have published (or at least attempted to publish), then you should check copyright catalog entries for his/her/their active years to see if the works were registered. If so, there is a very good chance that a copy of the work is sitting in somewhere like the Library of Congress. Again, referring back to Price, I believe a good deal of her music was found this way.
                • If the composer was associated with a particular school, consult its library and archives for music (or at the very least, references to the music). Libraries local to the composer or important to the composer may have been the recipients of his/her/their papers. Likewise, if a performer is known to have performed this composer's works, check the performer's academic papers and bequeathals.
                • There is more to public domain musical life than IMSLP and CPDL. Sources available to the general public are Alexander Street, Sibley Music Library's digital holdings, Google Books, and Open Library/The Internet Archive (to name a few). There are a few more scholarly resources that are less open, but it is not too terribly difficult to find a way to them. Become acquainted with your friendly neighborhood musicologist. NB: There is a presupposition here that the composer for whom you are looking has published works.
                • Write to a specialist on that composer, or write to your local university's professors if a specialist is not known. Do not confine yourself to just the music department. Occasionally, a literature professor will know something about a composer because the composer set a particular writer's works, or a composer and author moved in the same artistic circles.

                Once you acquire the music, performance rights and such are a different matter. Copyright law, especially international copyright law, can be tricky to navigate. I know the bare basics, but I will leave that matter to those more knowledgeable.

                I hope this provides a good jumping-off point. Please let me know if I can provide any advice, or any specific information.

                Comment


                • #28
                  For people interested in this topic, I have a "twofer" (American slang meaning "two for the price of one") for you. Rhonda Edgington, who teaches organ at Calvin University, is playing a concert featuring the music of Margaret Sandresky. Here are Edgington's comments about Sandresky:
                  .
                  Margaret Sandresky will turn 100 years old in April 2021. This American composer ... was awarded the AGO Distinguished Composer Award in 2004. Sandresky studied composition at Salem College, Eastman School of Music, and under a Fulbright scholarship in Germany. She taught composition at Oberlin, University of Texas-Austin, headed the organ department at Salem College, and founded the organ department at the North Carolina School for the Arts. After retiring in 1986, she has concentrated more on composing, and is still going strong, with the latest volume of her organ works published in 2018!

                  Her compositions range from larger cycles, based on sacred and secular themes, to variation sets, and many hymn settings, practical and useful for weekly Sunday preludes and postludes. She has a uniquely American style that is both accessible and innovative.
                  .

                  Sandresky's 10 volumes of organ works are available from Wayne Leupold.

                  If you would like to hear some of the works, you can find them on Edgington's YouTube channel here:

                  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaE...HG32g/featured
                  Bill

                  My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    The current Pipedreams program is dedicated to the music of Margaret Sandresky in honor of her 100th birthday. In addition to a wonderful survey of her work, Michael Barone includes comments from his interview with her.

                    https://www.pipedreams.org/episode/2...till-composing
                    Bill

                    My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

                    Comment

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