Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My carousel music experiment.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My carousel music experiment.

    Nothings seems to fit a carousel ride like pipe organ music.

    Are these three pieces the best fit for a carousel?

    1. Bach: Toccata in F Major
    2. Bach: Jig Fugue in G Major
    3. Johann Strauss: Blue Danube Waltz

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BaKApF1vec



  • #2
    It got better as it went along. I guess that's working. :)
    -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
    -- Rodgers W5000, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3, E112, L-102
    -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

    Comment


    • #3
      The Toccata is in 3/4 time which I suspect gives it its waltz-like feel. The Jig fugue is in an odd time signature: 12/8. It seems rather jumpy. It sounds like the piece is full of triplets.

      Comment


      • #4
        As I said to you in another post, there's nothing at all odd about 12/8. It's a compound time signature, it has four beats to the bar, each one being a dotted crotchet in length, which is then subdivided into three quavers totalling 12 in the bar. (There are not, as some people think, 12 beats to the bar, even though that top number is 12!) You could produce the same musical effect if you wrote the piece in 4/4, with each crotchet beat being subdivided into three triplet quavers. In fact, music theory grades will require the student to be able to rewrite a 12/8 piece in 4/4, or vice versa.

        Lively compound time pieces will sound bouncy or jumpy, as that fugue does. Think of all those Sousa marches in 6/8, for example!

        If you're unsure about things like compound time, I do offer theory lessons via Zoom! :)

        Carousel music? I'd probably plump for something like a Viennese Waltz, or perhaps a Polka. I feel a Strauss theme coming on here!
        It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

        New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

        Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
        Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
        Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
        Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by andyg View Post
          As I said to you in another post, there's nothing at all odd about 12/8. It's a compound time signature, it has four beats to the bar, each one being a dotted crotchet in length, which is then subdivided into three quavers totalling 12 in the bar. (There are not, as some people think, 12 beats to the bar, even though that top number is 12!) You could produce the same musical effect if you wrote the piece in 4/4, with each crotchet beat being subdivided into three triplet quavers. In fact, music theory grades will require the student to be able to rewrite a 12/8 piece in 4/4, or vice versa.

          Lively compound time pieces will sound bouncy or jumpy, as that fugue does. Think of all those Sousa marches in 6/8, for example!

          If you're unsure about things like compound time, I do offer theory lessons via Zoom! :)

          Carousel music? I'd probably plump for something like a Viennese Waltz, or perhaps a Polka. I feel a Strauss theme coming on here!
          I thought 12/8 had 12 8th notes to the bar. No, I've never heard any Bach piece on a carousel before though those two Bach pieces seem fitting. Sweet and child-like. A Strauss or Viennese waltz seems most familiar on that revolving vehicle. The 3rd movement of Bach's Toccata Adagio and Fugue in C Major also seems fitting. The 6/8 fugue (according to Wikipedia) in that work has a giddy jumpiness to the beat too. You always need a happy major key on a carousel, never a gloomy minor key.

          How could a carousel even play a grand Bach piece with an inferior carousel organ? I think of Bach on massive church organs. No doubt, it would have to be recorded music over a quality hi-fi system built into the amusement ride. E Power Biggs is the perfect Bach organist for carousel recording playback of select movements.

          Comment


          • afuller5
            afuller5 commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, 12/8 does have 12 eighth notes to the bar. However, the eighth notes do get the "beat." The dotted quarter note gets the "beat." Each beat is divided into three "pulses" which are the eighth notes. Many of the slow popular tunes from the 1950s were essential in 12/8. An example would be "Earth Angel."

            As Andy mentioned in another thread music in 12/8 can be written in 4/4 using eight note triplets.

            Since Andy is music teacher, I'm sure he can explain this better than I. But I hope this helps a little.

            Allen

          • andyg
            andyg commented
            Editing a comment
            You're making the mistake of thinking that major = happy and minor = gloomy. Not so. It's a broad 'rule of thumb' but there are many, many exceptions. Two that come to mind instantly for carousel music are from the pen of Mr Mozart: Rondo alla Turca and the Allegro Molto 1st movement of Symphony N0.40. And there are plenty of miserable, nostalgic and comtemplative pieces in major keys, too!

            And do a little research into the organs that JSB might have played. Not all were 'massive church organs'.

            As for 12/8, in case my explanation wasn't clear. There are four beats to the bar, each subdivided into 3. If the dotted crotchet tempo is slow, then you'd count it '1 and a 2 and a 3 and a 4 and a'. 6/8 has just two beats to the bar. Again, slow pieces can be counted as '1 and a 2 and a', but faster pieces would get your tongue in a twist! So we'd just count the beats, 1 -2, 1-2, etc.

            Now you can try this for faster 6/8 pieces: Crotchet followed by a quaver (equalling 1 dotted crotchet beat, of course) can be counted as 'dum di', with the dum being twice as long as the di. Three quavers (again making up a dotted crotchet beat) can be counted as the word 'diddly', but spoken as 'di-de-ly'. Each syllable at the same speed!

            So Mr Sousa's "Liberty Bell March" would be counted as: di | dum-di di-de-ly | dum-di dum-di | dum-di dum-di | deeee | and so on!

        • #6
          For a carousel, how about Louie L-W:



          Comment


          • SchnarrHorn
            SchnarrHorn commented
            Editing a comment
            Now, now, see here starting at 39 seconds:

            https://youtu.be/6DWC3mIyDqQ?t=39

          • myorgan
            myorgan commented
            Editing a comment
            Those are trained Lipizzaner stallions. What good is that out West? I'm talking about real horses.;-) Spaniards might want to waltz with their horses, but I don't.

            Michael

          • SchnarrHorn
            SchnarrHorn commented
            Editing a comment
            True that. Hard to picture John Wayne or James Arness on Lippizaners. :-)

        • #7
          Video game music would probably be a good source to check into since they are based on specific themes. Some will be overly simple, some more advanced, but they could be inspiration for your own composition. I liked the tune from the Andy Griffith episode where the guy is selling elixir (distilled alcohol), he had a organ cart for his sales pitch.
          Allen 530A

          Comment


          • #8
            I like Bach's music because it's beautiful and divine and so is the Strauss waltz. The lively and jumpy triplet beat represents a galloping horse as in Bach's jig fugue. The smooth sweeping flow of the 3/4 waltz beat seems to go well with continuous revolution and the slow bobbing movement of the wooden painted carousel horses. I think of lovely and graceful music for carousel motion. It's in the rhythm. I'm old-fashioned in my tastes too. Classical music adds class to old amusement rides.

            The fugue in Bach's Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C Major would be great for carousel music as would the first movement of Bach's Trio Sonata Number 5 in C Major.

            Comment


            • #9
              Originally posted by jonmyrlebailey View Post
              Nothings seems to fit a carousel ride like pipe organ music.

              Are these three pieces the best fit for a carousel?

              1. Bach: Toccata in F Major
              2. Bach: Jig Fugue in G Major
              3. Johann Strauss: Blue Danube Waltz

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BaKApF1vec

              Happy New Year!!

              I've just revised my home video to include a total of five classical organ pieces most fitting for a carousel. These are the most jolly classical organ pieces ever.

              Here is the new link to five classical carousel organ pieces and enjoy:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLxy...ature=youtu.be



              Did wiggy-jiggy old Bach himself envision circling wooden animals waltzing to his music during the Baroque Period? Has the waltz dance even been in existence since the Baroque times? Bach was very ahead of his times in music. He was perhaps the most avant garde classical composer ever. Bach was the most funky classical composer ever. Some of his works' movements clearly have syncopated beats. He was often praised by by jazz and rock and roll innovators in the 20th century as John Lennon and Dave Brubeck while several of popular music personalities have told Beethoven to roll over in song. Even Dave Brubeck had a jazz number called a "fugue" of sorts. Fugue on Bop Theme:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1m39ZL9UzRw
              Last edited by jonmyrlebailey; 01-01-2021, 02:16 PM.

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by SchnarrHorn View Post
                For a carousel, how about Louie L-W:



                Very insipid organ music in comparison with that fantastic stuff by Johann S. Bach and even Strauss. How about some of Joplin's ragtime pieces on organ for carousel?

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYLRRNBnJfU

                Of course, I would like to hear The Ragtime Dance on a classical pipe organ.

                Comment


                • SchnarrHorn
                  SchnarrHorn commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I wasn't able to find The Ragtime Dance on a classical organ on youtube but did find the Maple Leaf rag on a tracker in Germany. Sounds nice. E.P. Biggs arranged some Joplin for organ (the music book is still available) but the only recording of him with these pieces is on a pedal harpsichord, not organ, that I know of. I personally don't care for it much - skeletons, tin roof, etc. :-) - but like Joplin better on the organ, but that's just me.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ClfJVRebhE

              • #11
                I have the complete Biggs collection for Joplin pieces on pedal harpsichord and my mother used to own those on 8-track from Columbia Records in the mid-1970's. I really like the cheerful crisp sound of these pieces on harpsichord. I would really like to hear The Ragtime Dance and Gladiolus Rag on pedal harpsichord and also the Chrysanthemum Rag which three pieces Biggs never recorded. The Ragtime Dance is waltzy enough for a carousel ride though. The ice-cream-truck sound of The Original Rags Biggs recorded would also be sweet on a merry-go-round organ.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rL0E1PGet7Q
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHOZPg2TLDA
                Last edited by jonmyrlebailey; 01-03-2021, 12:18 AM.

                Comment


                • #12
                  Originally posted by jonmyrlebailey View Post

                  Happy New Year!!

                  I've just revised my home video to include a total of five classical organ pieces most fitting for a carousel. These are the most jolly classical organ pieces ever.

                  Here is the new link to five classical carousel organ pieces and enjoy:

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLxy...ature=youtu.be



                  Did wiggy-jiggy old Bach himself envision circling wooden animals waltzing to his music during the Baroque Period? Has the waltz dance even been in existence since the Baroque times? Bach was very ahead of his times in music. He was perhaps the most avant garde classical composer ever. Bach was the most funky classical composer ever. Some of his works' movements clearly have syncopated beats. He was often praised by by jazz and rock and roll innovators in the 20th century as John Lennon and Dave Brubeck while several of popular music personalities have told Beethoven to roll over in song. Even Dave Brubeck had a jazz number called a "fugue" of sorts. Fugue on Bop Theme:

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1m39ZL9UzRw


                  Oops, correction on the video link to the carousel:
                  https://www.youtube.com/embed/aLxydMJurFA

                  Here is the same video embedded:
                  Last edited by jonmyrlebailey; 01-04-2021, 02:51 AM.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X