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Matthew Camidge: organ concerto in g minor

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  • Matthew Camidge: organ concerto in g minor

    From time to time, I browse IMSLP for organ music and today I found the composer Matthew Camidge, previously not known to me. I was curious and had a look at the organ concerto in g minor - apparently there are several concertos written as opus 13, but only the g minor concerto has been uploaded in an edited version by T. Nobles.
    In this version, the organist can show off their pedalling skills, but I have doubts that the original has such a complex pedal part.
    Has anyone here ever played the concerto in g minor and has used another version than the Nobles one? Or does anyone have the Novello edition and knows whether it's manuals only or has a separate pedal part?

    I will order the Novello and once I have it, I can say more about it. But this might take a while.

  • #2
    I'd never heard of him: https://www.allmusic.com/artist/matt...1064/biography

    Meanwhile, here's a performance of that concerto: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDJ2bHEZgIE
    -------

    Hammond M-102 #21000.
    Leslie 147 #F7453.
    Hammond S-6 #72421

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    • #3
      I used to play this concerto a lot in recitals. It's a very attractive piece. Camidge's organ at York Minster, though large, had no pedal pipes (see attached scan from the Novello edition) so the pedals would only have been used to help out the manuals. Pedal is only marked in the 2nd movement (bars 82-83).

      The third movement is problematical. I play the melody in the right hand and the accompanying parts with left hand and pedal (coupled to manual): at two points you have to double pedal. The Gavotta is good just played on its own.
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        Originally posted by andijah View Post
        In this version, the organist can show off their pedalling skills, but I have doubts that the original has such a complex pedal part.
        This concerto is from Camidge's Six Concertos for the Organ or Grand Piano Forte, Op. 13, published in 1815. T. Tertius Noble's edition was published by H. W. Gray 100 years later. While I do not have access to the original score, I believe your instincts are correct about the complex pedal part. I have listened to a performance of this work on the organ and the pedal is not used in many of the places where it is indicated in the Noble edition.

        I used to have a collection of English organ music in my library that included some pieces by Camidge and I do not recall them having any pedal indications. (Unfortunately I no longer have it in my library to check.) English organs of this period often did not have pedal divisions. Those organs that did, might only have one or two 16' stops, although they could be coupled to the manuals.
        Bill

        My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

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        • #5
          Thank you! This is very helpful. 😊

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          • #6
            Actually, I've just checked the Tertius Noble edition and I note that he completely rewrites the accompaniment. Not acceptable, in my view.

            I can scan the Novello edition while you wait for yours if you want.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Peterboroughdiapason View Post
              Actually, I've just checked the Tertius Noble edition and I note that he completely rewrites the accompaniment.
              That's very interesting. Sometimes, pieces "win" when they're adapted for large organs with full pedalboard, and sometimes it's better to stick to the original.

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              • Peterboroughdiapason
                Peterboroughdiapason commented
                Editing a comment
                I think early English organ music (and I regard this as early, in spite of being 19th century) is always much better in its original form. There are exceptions, for example a trumpet voluntary when used for a wedding or as a grand voluntary.

            • #8
              The Novello edition of the concerto was in the letterbox today 😊
              It's indeed very different from the Nobles version and I think I like the "slim" original version a lot better. Will try it out on different organs.

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