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  • Hymns and Modulations

    That brings up another point. I prefer crash modulations which repeat the last line and make a quick key change. Doesn't give the congregation time to worry about what is happening or makes the organist look like he or she is doing a private concert.

  • #2
    Re: Hymns and Modulations

    I prefer crash modulations which repeat the last line and make a quick key change.

    Yep, all you have to do is turn that transposer knob. :-D

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    • #3
      Re: Hymns and Modulations

      Transposer knob? -- not me!

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      • #4
        Re: Hymns and Modulations

        No way will I use a transposer. Absolutely not! I prefer to play onywhere from one to a few chords to make a modulation. Remember the pivot chord when you took Harmony 101? My Harmony teacher told us that church organists modulate too fast. Some modulations are too shocking.

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        • #5
          Re: Hymns and Modulations

          I'm new to all this. What exactly is a modulation? Is that when a hymn is finished and the organist does a brief little ending type thing?

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          • #6
            Re: Hymns and Modulations

            A modulation is the harmonic transition from one key to another.

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            • #7
              Re: Hymns and Modulations

              Ohh, I see.

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              • #8
                Re: Hymns and Modulations

                When I was just a youngster, I made my way to the choir loft one Sunday to ask the organist how he made his transposition from one hymn to another. He asked me if I knew what a 7th chord was. I was just beginning so I with red face said no. He quipped to me, "then there is no use explaining how I made that move." Obviously, I never forgot it for here I am repeating my disdain for a man who could not take 30 seconds to explain a simple notion. Soon thereafter, with much practice it became obvious in just simple playing of preludes etc., how the music itself was modulating all the time. It wasn't hard from there to begin to understand the relationship between certain keys and how best to get from one to the other. In so far as the embellishing element...well the organ is mostly legato whether in playing or transitioning. Anything abrupt sounds poor except in the case of pure emergency when it looks like the world below might be waiting for you to complete the chord. Depending on the circumstance, a few extra notes make a graceful transition. One final note on the organist already noted, he was not a very good one. Did I mention I am part Sicilian?

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                • #9
                  Re: Hymns and Modulations

                  I know how you feel. In my days of learning how to play, I've run across many cocky musicians who don't want to take 30 seconds to give a learner a tip or two. Just 30 seconds can give someone like me a whole new outlook and feel on the keys.

                  --

                  Also, I'd never use a transposer on a keyboard. It's cheating, and it also throws your ear off because what your fingers are playing aren't the notes that are actually playing.

                  Either I can play in the key or not. If I can't, then it's a challenge to learn something new.

                  A few weeks ago, I was playing for a church and the pastor began to sing a song in B major - now THAT'S a hard key to play in. I could have transposed it using the option on the keyboard but I didn't.

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