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  • Recommendations for No-Pedals Preludes and Postludes

    I'm working on my pedal skills but I'd love to have a collection of things to play for preludes and postludes that do _not_ require pedals, so pedal-optional or manuals-only.

    Many thanks.

    -S-

  • #2
    Steve,

    When I am closer to my pedagogical literature, I will look for something. I remember reading something about literature for manuals only the other day, but will have to refer back to my texts.

    Michael

    P.S. Don't give up on pedals yet!
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      Pinned on the 'Liturgical and Gospel' forum is my thread about The Village Organist volumes. They're out of copyright and all freely downloadable. There's quite a bit of manuals only stuff in there, and due to the nature of it being for the village organ and organist, mostly undemanding with both player and instrument. They're definitely amongst my "go-to" books for services, and always go down well!

      Comment


      • #4
        There is a series of manuals only music, Old English Organ Music for Manuals, books 1 - 6.
        http://www.amazon.com/English-Organ-.../dp/0193758245

        There is a whole mess of Telemann organ works with no pedal, including chorale preludes.

        Comment


        • #5
          You might be interested in what IMSLP has to offer in the way of "Old English Organ Music." Just type it into the search engine there and scads of it pop up. Here's en example: http://imslp.org/wiki/10_Voluntaries...nnett,_John%29

          I just got through playing a series for both English baroque preludes & postludes while working on bigger pieces. Some of the English manual music is trickier than others, but, it's a delightful change of pace.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Steve Freides View Post
            I'm working on my pedal skills but I'd love to have a collection of things to play for preludes and postludes that do _not_ require pedals, so pedal-optional or manuals-only.
            Steve,

            Off the top of my head, I'd recommend you look at some of Johann Christoph Bach's pieces. I seem to remember he had some chorale preludes that were manuals only. Or maybe it was Johann Christian Bach?

            In any event, the following list is from David N. Johnson's Organ Teacher's Guide:You can find most of the manual-only compositions from these people on IMSLP for free, so you can see the music first. I hope you don't mind, but I made the composer's names active links to the IMSLP website.

            I also searched the website using Google with the following search phrase: site:imslp.org manuals only. That produced some links directly to organ pieces for manuals only.

            Last, don't forget that in old times, composers often wrote for the harpsichord, and the harpsichord often had 2 manuals (& sometimes pedals). Often, the music of the harpsichord and organ is used interchangeably. For example, when performing Bach's Brandenburg Concerti performed with strings, the Continuo part is often realized for both Harpsichord and Organ.

            I hope that gives you a starting point. I would have scanned the page or two from the Organ Teacher's Guide to share, but I'd rather not thwart copyright.

            Michael

            - - - Updated - - -

            Originally posted by denf View Post
            You might be interested in what IMSLP has to offer in the way of "Old English Organ Music." Just type it into the search engine there and scads of it pop up. Here's en example: http://imslp.org/wiki/10_Voluntaries...nnett,_John%29
            Denf,

            I forgot about the English Voluntaries (i.e. John Stanley, William Boyce, and Maurice Greene). Great idea! I especially like Greene's Voluntary VIII and Boyce's Voluntary I (Trumpet).
            Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
            • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
            • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
            • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow, great stuff, everyone - thank you!

              And now a silly question, perhaps, but here goes:

              It's about a piece I found in an old issue of The Organist, Vol. 82, No. 4, from September, 1978. I bought a pile of these on ebay. Completely without pedals, marked to be played on the Great.

              The piece is entitled Benediction - by Franz Schubert, arranged by L. N. Porter.

              It's go dynamics - piano, mezzo-forte, forte, and also crescendi and descresceni. How does one do those on an organ? The organ at my church adds stops when you use the crescendo pedal - not an effect I'm fond of. All advice gratefully accepted!

              -S-

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              • #8
                I discovered one thing on my organ at home - the Swell pedal doesn't add stops, just makes things, well, like a real swell box would, basically louder and a bit brighter. That's useful.

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                • #9
                  The Organ Historical Society has a pretty good catalog of organ music. A search for "manuals only" brought up 78 matches.

                  http://www.ohscatalog.org/nsearch.ht...log=ohscatalog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Steve Freides View Post
                    It's go dynamics - piano, mezzo-forte, forte, and also crescendi and descresceni. How does one do those on an organ? The organ at my church adds stops when you use the crescendo pedal - not an effect I'm fond of. All advice gratefully accepted!
                    Steve,

                    In the attached photo, you'll see 3 Pedals. The one to the right is always the Crescendo pedal. When you gradually open that pedal, it adds one stop at a time on manuals from softest stops to loudest stops. The pedal is often slightly higher than the other pedals.

                    The leftmost pedal controls the Great and Pedals, and the middle pedal controls the Swell. If you only have one pedal, it controls the entire organ. These pedals are often called "boxes" because on a pipe organ, they open the soundproof boxes that enclose the pipes of each division of the organ. For example, a Swell box generally contains all the pipes that speak from the stops pulled on the Swell division and played on the Swell keyboard. As you open the pedal, it gradually opens shades that look like venetian blinds--they can be either vertical or horizontal.

                    Alternately, you can add and remove stops to do the crescendo and decrescendo, but it is generally done with the Swell pedals. I hope this is what you needed to know.

                    Michael
                    Attached Files
                    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yes, Michael, thank you, that's it.

                      -S-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        One Sunday down so far. I played

                        Prelude: WTC Prelude in C major

                        Offertory: That Schubert arrangement I'd mentioned previously

                        Postlude: Little Prelude, also in C, the one that starts Do Mi Sol in quarter notes in the left hand.

                        All w/ no feet so far.

                        And I played classical guitar for half an hour during the coffee/social.

                        - - - Updated - - -

                        For this Sunday, I've come across a few things in the Little Organ Book by Flor Peeters. I want you to tell me if I'm committing any grave musical sins with my ideas here - I hope not!

                        Page 29, the first piece of the section of Three-Part Manual Playing, "Choralprel: Now, My Tongue."

                        What I just practiced was to play the piece twice. The first time through, I played the top two voices on the swell and the lower part on the great. I have the Great set up with a 16 foot stop in addition to some 8- and 4-foot things. The first time through, I played the left hand on the Great but an octave higher than written. The second time through, as written.

                        I thought it worked well. Another approach, similar result, would be to use the memory buttons and just add a 16-foot stop or otherwise change the sound for the second verse, allowing me to play it twice in the same places on the manuals.

                        Thanks in advance for your comments - I will post the registration I'm using here at home when I have a few more minutes later in the day.

                        -S-

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JonathanP View Post
                          Pinned on the 'Liturgical and Gospel' forum is my thread about The Village Organist volumes. They're out of copyright and all freely downloadable. There's quite a bit of manuals only stuff in there, and due to the nature of it being for the village organ and organist, mostly undemanding with both player and instrument. They're definitely amongst my "go-to" books for services, and always go down well!
                          Jonathan or anyone else, I just paged through the entire Volume 8 (the first link) and didn't see any pieces without pedals. Might there be one or more specific volumes that are without pedals.

                          I hasten to add that the pedal parts to many look quite easy and I will get to work on them, but for this coming Sunday, I'm still looking for a piece without any pedals whatsoever and there is _so_ much music in your link and I won't get it all printed out or even all looked through this afternoon.

                          Many thanks!

                          -S-

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I found a piece in Volume 1 that has exactly one, count 'em, one pedal note. Rather like a switch - turn it on or turn it off. I'm playing that on Sunday.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Steve Freides View Post
                              I hasten to add that the pedal parts to many look quite easy and I will get to work on them, but for this coming Sunday, I'm still looking for a piece without any pedals whatsoever and there is _so_ much music in your link and I won't get it all printed out or even all looked through this afternoon.
                              Steve,

                              If I remember right, all the links I provided in Post #6 were manuals only. If not, it certainly should be easy to find some there. The suggestion about English Voluntaries was also a good one. The reason is that English organs of the time had few (or no) pedals, therefore, not much music was written to include pedals.

                              Glad you made it through your first Sunday.

                              Michael
                              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                              • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

                              Comment

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