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Recommendations for No-Pedals Preludes and Postludes

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by musikfan View Post
    In regards to the discussion about volume control (swell, great, and crescendo pedals), the pipe organ at my college had shutters that would open and close in the chamber. You could actually see them in operation as you depressed the pedal.
    That is true only of the Swell, Great, and/or Choir boxes. The Crescendo simply adds stops, and unfortunately, there's no mechanism for quickly knowing which stops have been added, and in which order on most organs. I would imagine on digitals, they could be programmed to have the stops light up as they are engaged by the Crescendo. Either that, or have the stops move as they are engaged. Unfortunately, no one has done that yet.

    Michael

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  • musikfan
    replied
    Great information here, folks. Funny thing is that I have such a hard time just playing the manuals whenever I'm at the bench. I feel like my feet are tied if I can't use the pedals. It's almost like this unwritten law that you HAVE to use your feet whenever you play the organ. I realize this is not true, but I suppose it's just years of doing the same thing....

    In regards to the discussion about volume control (swell, great, and crescendo pedals), the pipe organ at my college had shutters that would open and close in the chamber. You could actually see them in operation as you depressed the pedal.

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by Leisesturm View Post
    Crescendo pedals also usually include the 2-2/3 Swell Nazard and other mutations and on the size organs that many of us play (mid 20's of ranks) they remain rather prominent and objectionable until all the Reeds (the one reed) and mixtures are in to cover them.
    Liesesturm,

    Perhaps I was mistaken, but I thought the Crescendo pedal removed the Mutations (stops w/fractions in their numbers) when the Mixtures came in. I just checked the Allen Crescendo chart I have for the ADC-5400, and it does not indicate the removal of any Strings or Mutation stops as the Mixtures come in, or when Reeds are added.

    I much prefer the Tutti I and Tutti II pistons on any of my Allen ADC organs over the Crescendo pedal. The MOS-2 505B I have has the wire-contact Crescendo pedal, and that works great! However, the system implemented with the ADC era left much to be desired with its scratching and scraping.
    Originally posted by Peterboroughdiapason View Post
    This list, downloaded from the RSCM's UK website is a very useful source of manuals-only organ music. Much of the music is available on IMSLP and other sites.
    Peterboroughdiapason,

    Thank you for bringing us back on track. This was an old thread, recently revived. The list you provided is an excellent resource!

    Michael

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  • Peterboroughdiapason
    replied
    This list, downloaded from the RSCM's UK website is a very useful source of manuals-only organ music. Much of the music is available on IMSLP and other sites.
    Attached Files

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  • Leisesturm
    replied
    Originally posted by myorgan View Post
    I was surprised when I acquired my most recent organ (Allen ADC-5400) that the order of Crescendo was located and sent to me. It lists the stops in the order they are engaged as the Crescendo pedal is gradually opened--in effect, adding stops. Your post reminded me of that as an option. It's a shame Allen's ADC Crescendo pedal is so uncontrollable.

    So, you're left with pistons or the Swell boxes. Great suggestions, Leisesturm. I've never heard the parameters you describe, but they're worth much consideration. My only question is whether the Strings should be added first rather than after the Flutes.

    Michael
    The pp would probably be the Swell 8' string (Salicional?) with its celeste, but the strings on most American Classic organs are fairly keen. Its a real toss up to decide which to use first for the 'p' setting. I err on using the 8' flute because of its 'duller' quality. I would kill for a real independent 8' Swell Diapason on any organ I've played for a living. The 8' flute and 8' string together are supposed to be your Swell Diapason, but that isn't nearly enough weight to properly accompany any Great solo combination. Crescendo pedals would (IMO) become a lot more useable if they overrode the existing registration on the stops. The first thing any crescendo pedal does after drawing the 8' and 4' flutes is activate the Swell 8' to Great coupler. So if you open the crescendo pedal more than just a crack and you have the Swell Trumpet activated you are going to get that on the Great even though the crescendo pedal is barely open. That shouldn't be. Makes the crescendo pedal barely useful except as a possible extra expression pedal for your digital augmentations when you convince the Board of Trustees that you really need them. Crescendo pedals also usually include the 2-2/3 Swell Nazard and other mutations and on the size organs that many of us play (mid 20's of ranks) they remain rather prominent and objectionable until all the Reeds (the one reed) and mixtures are in to cover them. Actually I usually only use the crescendo pedal as a kind of 9th General piston instead of the "Full Organ" reversible. Now that thing is truly the most awful thing I have ever heard. I simply will not use it. Ever. <shudder>

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by Leisesturm View Post
    Two ways, by using the swell pedal, which on your organ controls the Swell Division*. Or you can add stops.
    [snip]
    On your instrument piano (p) is probably the 8' and 4' flute stops. . . .
    I was surprised when I acquired my most recent organ (Allen ADC-5400) that the order of Crescendo was located and sent to me. It lists the stops in the order they are engaged as the Crescendo pedal is gradually opened--in effect, adding stops. Your post reminded me of that as an option. It's a shame Allen's ADC Crescendo pedal is so uncontrollable.

    So, you're left with pistons or the Swell boxes. Great suggestions, Leisesturm. I've never heard the parameters you describe, but they're worth much consideration. My only question is whether the Strings should be added first rather than after the Flutes.

    Michael

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  • Leisesturm
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Freides View Post
    The piece is entitled Benediction - by Franz Schubert, arranged by L. N. Porter.

    It's go dynamics - piano, mezzo-forte, forte, and also crescendi and descresceni. How does one do those on an organ?
    Two ways, by using the swell pedal, which on your organ controls the Swell Division*. Or you can add stops. The way I have had it explained, if the score has the stanard elongated greater than or less than signs that signal crescendo, decrescendo for all instruments and voices, then you use the swell pedal. If the score uses the words crescendo or decresendo (usually abbreviated: cresc., decresc.) then you add or retire stops. The larger the organ the easier it is to get a smoot crescendo by adding stops.

    On your instrument piano (p) is probably the 8' and 4' flute stops. Mezzoforte adds the 8' string and maybe the 4' Principal with the Swell pedal halfway closed. A lot of this is subjective. To go louder you can carry the Swell registration down to the Great via the Swell to Great 8' coupler and pull the Great 8' (and 4'?) flutes. That is my 'standard' accompaniment for hymns for less than 100 singers. The Swell expression pedal will be fully open. After this its all up to you where you go from there. You have the Swell coupled to the Great so you could add the Swell 2' flute, or you could add the Great 8' Principal (Diapason). For a hymn I will solo the melody on the Great with the 8' and 4' Flute with the 4' Principal with Swell coupled, on the Swell will be all the 8' and 4' stops including the Celeste. It is easier to quickly add the other harmonies to that kind of solo registration than if you solo'ed the melody on a Reed stop.

    *There are organs with other divisions (Choir, Solo, Bombarde...) that can have swell (expression) pedals.

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  • MtHermonMaple
    replied
    Francois Couperin has written at least a few tunes that are ok in length for a postlude or prelude. A few trumpet tunes, a plein song, and some other nice things with no pedal but still a full organ sound! "Les Mess de Couvents" contains numerous pieces with no pedal of his work

    - - - Updated - - -

    Originally posted by MtHermonMaple View Post
    Francois Couperin has written at least a few tunes that are ok in length for a postlude or prelude. A few trumpet tunes, a plein song, and some other nice things with no pedal but still a full organ sound! "Les Mess de Couvents" contains numerous pieces with no pedal of his work

    I may add that the spelling of that is horrendous, I do not have the book in front of me as of now...

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  • Peterboroughdiapason
    replied
    You could try the "Oxford Service Books for Organ" - there are 6 graded volumes, 3 for manuals only. http://www.musicroom.com/se/id_no/01005806/details.htmlhttp://www.amazon.co.uk/EDITION-PETE.../dp/0300755171
    Last edited by Peterboroughdiapason; 11-23-2015, 09:37 AM.

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  • denf
    replied
    I've got several of Charles Callahan's music for manuals series. You can find them here: http://www.organmusiconly.com/Arrang...ort=20a&page=6 AND here: http://www.canticledistributing.com/...p=2&q=Callahan

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  • Young Organist
    replied
    Look at the Oxford Organ publications. I bought an easy, manuals only, book with many good preludes and postludes. Also, Rodger E. Davie's "The organ Manual" has many great techniques, on the organ, including pedals, and hymns. This is a MUST for all beginning organists. Oh, and it also have some beautiful, manuals only pieces that are GREAT for prelude/postlude.

    Hope this helps,
    YO

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve Freides View Post
    I hasten to add that the pedal parts to many look quite easy and I will get to work on them, but for this coming Sunday, I'm still looking for a piece without any pedals whatsoever and there is _so_ much music in your link and I won't get it all printed out or even all looked through this afternoon.
    Steve,

    If I remember right, all the links I provided in Post #6 were manuals only. If not, it certainly should be easy to find some there. The suggestion about English Voluntaries was also a good one. The reason is that English organs of the time had few (or no) pedals, therefore, not much music was written to include pedals.

    Glad you made it through your first Sunday.

    Michael

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  • Steve Freides
    replied
    I found a piece in Volume 1 that has exactly one, count 'em, one pedal note. Rather like a switch - turn it on or turn it off. I'm playing that on Sunday.

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  • Steve Freides
    replied
    Originally posted by JonathanP View Post
    Pinned on the 'Liturgical and Gospel' forum is my thread about The Village Organist volumes. They're out of copyright and all freely downloadable. There's quite a bit of manuals only stuff in there, and due to the nature of it being for the village organ and organist, mostly undemanding with both player and instrument. They're definitely amongst my "go-to" books for services, and always go down well!
    Jonathan or anyone else, I just paged through the entire Volume 8 (the first link) and didn't see any pieces without pedals. Might there be one or more specific volumes that are without pedals.

    I hasten to add that the pedal parts to many look quite easy and I will get to work on them, but for this coming Sunday, I'm still looking for a piece without any pedals whatsoever and there is _so_ much music in your link and I won't get it all printed out or even all looked through this afternoon.

    Many thanks!

    -S-

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  • Steve Freides
    replied
    One Sunday down so far. I played

    Prelude: WTC Prelude in C major

    Offertory: That Schubert arrangement I'd mentioned previously

    Postlude: Little Prelude, also in C, the one that starts Do Mi Sol in quarter notes in the left hand.

    All w/ no feet so far.

    And I played classical guitar for half an hour during the coffee/social.

    - - - Updated - - -

    For this Sunday, I've come across a few things in the Little Organ Book by Flor Peeters. I want you to tell me if I'm committing any grave musical sins with my ideas here - I hope not!

    Page 29, the first piece of the section of Three-Part Manual Playing, "Choralprel: Now, My Tongue."

    What I just practiced was to play the piece twice. The first time through, I played the top two voices on the swell and the lower part on the great. I have the Great set up with a 16 foot stop in addition to some 8- and 4-foot things. The first time through, I played the left hand on the Great but an octave higher than written. The second time through, as written.

    I thought it worked well. Another approach, similar result, would be to use the memory buttons and just add a 16-foot stop or otherwise change the sound for the second verse, allowing me to play it twice in the same places on the manuals.

    Thanks in advance for your comments - I will post the registration I'm using here at home when I have a few more minutes later in the day.

    -S-

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