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Which of these intros for the hymn Holy, Holy, Holy (NICAEA) do you like better?

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  • regeron
    replied
    Originally posted by myorgan View Post
    Sorry, but I prefer the introduction in the first video. The commonly accepted practice is 6-8 measures of the hymn played before the congregation sings. Generally, this includes the first phrase, and the end phrase of the piece. Of course, with every accepted practice are viable exceptions. In your video, the first phrase isn't finished--it's only 8 beats (2 measures)--which makes it feel unnatural.

    Michael
    I agree with Michael. The first phrase of the second video feels cut off. I will often shorten an intro, especially on longer hymns, but I try to keep the phrase length consistent. If the hymn consists of 4 phrases of 4 measures each, I'll try to do the first and last phrases (complete), as long as the harmonic progression between those two phrases is logical. Another option is to do the first two phrases. If the second phrase doesn't cadence in the home key, I might modify the ending to accommodate this. If the context is right, I might consider ending on the Dominant seventh.

    In other instances, if there is time and the mood is right, I'll actually create a solo prelude with a proper introduction, then a playover of the hymn as a keyboard solo, followed by the singing of the hymn. I cue my choir to stand during the last line, which is the congregation's cue to get ready to sing. There is never a problem coming in at the right time. I did that Christmas Eve, playing bell-like open fifths with my Right Hand on the piano, and then my Left Hand came in with the tune and a second part - a kind of Soprano/Alto 2-part arrangement against the Right Hand 'bell' accompaniment. I continued this for the first verse. It helped that the hymn was well-known. Second and Third verses were a more traditional accompaniment.

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  • Polkahero
    replied
    The intro in the second video is too short. Also, your music director has no clue how this particular hymn should be registered!

    The only time I play through an entire hymn as an intro is when the hymn is only 2 systems in length. Otherwise, usually either the first and last lines or the last two lines are sufficient. Unless I use my church's hymn intro book that accompanies our hymnal. Some are really good but I played one tonight that was too long even with a cut I made. Not good when the congregation is asked to stand for the entire hymn!

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  • beel m
    replied
    I used to do that (called a "playover") until I read John Bertalot's book, which discouraged the practice, so I stopped (except for a new hymn, where not only do I do a playover, but also line the meody out on a reed stop for a verse or two) and no one's ever complained. At my present church, our priest must head to another church right after the postude... so time counts, and short hymn intros help!
    Merry Christmas, Bill

    Originally posted by ArthurCambronne View Post
    Interesting.

    At my church, for as long as I can remember, all the organists have always played the entire piece once through before the congregation sings.

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by ArthurCambronne View Post
    At my church, for as long as I can remember, all the organists have always played the entire piece once through before the congregation sings.
    Arthur,

    At some churches the tradition is to play the entire hymn for an introduction. I never ran into that tradition until I was in college. I think, perhaps, playing the entire hymn would be considered one of the "viable exceptions" I mentioned in my earlier post. In fact, I wouldn't even consider it an exception--rather, a tradition. Thanks for bringing that up, because I had forgotten that some churches do that.

    Michael

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  • ArthurCambronne
    replied
    Interesting.

    At my church, for as long as I can remember, all the organists have always played the entire piece once through before the congregation sings.

    Leave a comment:


  • myorgan
    replied
    Sorry, but I prefer the introduction in the first video. The commonly accepted practice is 6-8 measures of the hymn played before the congregation sings. Generally, this includes the first phrase, and the end phrase of the piece. Of course, with every accepted practice are viable exceptions. In your video, the first phrase isn't finished--it's only 8 beats (2 measures)--which makes it feel unnatural.

    You're fortunate in that your church congregation actually appears to sing. I wish that could be said about most congregations nowadays!

    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • AllenMDS
    replied
    Originally posted by beel m View Post
    They're both good! What type of church are you at? My previous position was a southern Presbyterian congregation where they sang lustily, so the organ accompaniments (and hymn intros) were, um, rather bold... now I'm at a little Episcopal church where they don't sing well, so I (have to) use a much less aggressive style of leading the hymn singing, and of course more gentle intros... Just a thought!
    Merry Christmas, Bill
    It is a Catholic Church. Merry Christmas to you as well!

    -Jack

    Leave a comment:


  • beel m
    replied
    They're both good! What type of church are you at? My previous position was a southern Presbyterian congregation where they sang lustily, so the organ accompaniments (and hymn intros) were, um, rather bold... now I'm at a little Episcopal church where they don't sing well, so I (have to) use a much less aggressive style of leading the hymn singing, and of course more gentle intros... Just a thought!
    Merry Christmas, Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Which of these intros for the hymn Holy, Holy, Holy (NICAEA) do you like better?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=aQkxcQG1JcM

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lo5rZLPQmDQ


    I personally prefer the second one. I have tried them both, and to me, the second one flows better, more smoothly and naturally. By the way, the second organist is me. Sorry if the registrations are a bit quiet, that was how the music director wanted it.
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