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Suggestions for Maundy Thursday music

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  • Suggestions for Maundy Thursday music

    This will be my first official Maundy Thursday in my organist career. Anybody have any good hymn suggestions to use for the evening which will be here in April?? Many thanks for any help and advice.
    Craig

    Hammond L143 with Leslie 760

  • #2
    These are some of my favourites:

    Now my tongue the mystery telling (tune: Pange Lingua or St. Thomas)

    This is the hour on banquet and of song (tune: Canticum Refectionis)

    O saving victim opening wide (tune: Martyr Dei or St. Vincent)

    And now O father, mindful of the love (tune: Unde et Memores)
    -----------------
    Johannus Opus 1100 (ca. 1990)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by musikfan View Post
      This will be my first official Maundy Thursday in my organist career. Anybody have any good hymn suggestions to use for the evening which will be here in April?? Many thanks for any help and advice.
      It matters, I think, exactly which flavor of Protestant you are affiliated with. I would offer different suggestions depending.

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      • #4
        One of my favorites is Prelude on the Kyrie composed by Jean Langlais. Slow and very somber it reflects the mood for the congregation.

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        • #5
          Remember, too, that the crucifixion is Good Friday, not Maundy Thursday. "Maundy" comes from the Latin beginning to the service: "I give you a new commandment (mandate), that you love one another." There is foreshadowing, of course, but save some of the blood for Friday.

          Jesus knows/suspects that life will not go well for him in the near future, but even he doesn't know exactly how or when. In light of that, he has chosen to do something beautiful, to share a meal with those close to him and to give them encouragement (even though they don't yet understand why).

          In a similar vein, Easter Sunday readings mention an empty tomb, not an empty cross. The women at the tomb do not complain about all the blood all over. As people encounter the risen Christ, other than the challenge to put your fingers into the wounds, the death is downplayed. At that point in time, the followers are so overjoyed at the resurrection that they can't contain themselves.

          So, "Love" on Maundy Thursday; "Weep" on Good Friday; "Rejoice" on Easter Sunday.

          Sorry, some words might not be the best choice, but I hope the sentiment comes through.

          That said, I'd go with the theme of overwhelming, unconditional love for Maundy Thursday.

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          • #6
            Great suggestions, folks! Thanks so much, and keep them coming if you think of more!
            Craig

            Hammond L143 with Leslie 760

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            • #7
              Originally posted by regeron View Post
              Remember, too, that the crucifixion is Good Friday, not Maundy Thursday. "Maundy" comes from the Latin beginning to the service: "I give you a new commandment (mandate), that you love one another." There is foreshadowing, of course, but save some of the blood for Friday.

              Jesus knows/suspects that life will not go well for him in the near future, but even he doesn't know exactly how or when. In light of that, he has chosen to do something beautiful, to share a meal with those close to him and to give them encouragement (even though they don't yet understand why).

              In a similar vein, Easter Sunday readings mention an empty tomb, not an empty cross. The women at the tomb do not complain about all the blood all over. As people encounter the risen Christ, other than the challenge to put your fingers into the wounds, the death is downplayed. At that point in time, the followers are so overjoyed at the resurrection that they can't contain themselves.

              So, "Love" on Maundy Thursday; "Weep" on Good Friday; "Rejoice" on Easter Sunday.

              Sorry, some words might not be the best choice, but I hope the sentiment comes through.

              That said, I'd go with the theme of overwhelming, unconditional love for Maundy Thursday.
              Maundy Thursday (called Great and Holy Thursday) is a commemoration of Jesus's institution of the Holy Eucharist, at least in all the liturgical churches. Yes, to use your word, it is a "foreshadowing". That is why that during Holy Week, all crosses are veiled--but the veils are not opaque and the cross is still visible.

              In some churches, the Holy Eucharist (Lord's Supper) is an infrequent celebration. Generally, in the liturgical churches, the Eucharist is celebrated every Sunday and Holy Day, with only one exception, Good Friday, when the altar is stripped and the people await news of the ressurection.

              The first Gospel reading on Maundy Thursday is the Passion as recorded by St. Luke, from the arraignment before Pilate to and including the crucifixion. The alternate Gospel reading is the account of the Last Supper according to St. John.

              In the Maundy Thursday Eucharist, as one of the ancient prayers reminds us, we remember that on this night, Jesus commanded us saying "Do this in remembrance of me."

              The main meaning of Maundy Thursday is not the foot washing, it is the institution of the Holy Sacrement of the Most Blessed Body and Blood of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. It is the night of agony that foreshadows the outpouring of the blood of salvation.

              Furthermore, liturgical days begin at sunset on the evening before. Traditionally, Maundy Thursday is celebrated on the eve of Good Friday, making Maundy Thursday the official beginning of Good Friday, whose rites are celebrated during the day, from noon to three p.m. There is no celebration of the Eucharist, and the people take communion from consecrated bread and wine held over from the Maundy Thursday rite.
              Last edited by DrBen; 03-06-2017, 06:01 PM.
              -----------------
              Johannus Opus 1100 (ca. 1990)

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              • #8
                Thanks DrBen,

                I stand corrected, but happy to have the truth on the table. I had forgotten, for example, that the day begins at sunset of the evening before.

                I still find it interesting that the original disciples would have experienced the Last Supper PRIOR to the crucifixion, and the impact that might have made on them as they saw events unfold; and how their direct, physical connection to Jesus affected their continuing observation of that sacrament, in contract to us who only have a spiritual connection.

                This also makes me curious (not coming from a liturgical background) - where does Tenebrae fit into this?

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                • #9
                  You guys know a WHOLE lot more than I do about the liturgical holy days. I was raised in a Baptist church and never heard anything about this. However, I'm definitely getting and education on these things from all the great info here on the forum. I do like the symbolism and what each service represents. Of course, in my upbringing, the focus was always on the resurrection. The death of Christ was certainly highlighted, but the center of the celebration was always the resurrection. I suppose that was because this was the ultimate event. All the other things leading up to it would have no affect if He had not risen on the third day. But as I said, I have found that these other celebrations are very helpful visual aids in showing the whole process. The Lutheran church where I play celebrates these other services, of course. My own church also has a Sunrise service on Easter Sunday morning.
                  Craig

                  Hammond L143 with Leslie 760

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