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Don Hustad Organ Used for Rodgers Recording

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  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    In looking at the picture of the organ again, it makes me think the console was, indeed, designed for a church. It looks like it was designed to go in an organ pit rather than to be at platform/stage level. Hence the narrower bottom.

    Michael

  • voet
    commented on 's reply
    I appreciate your post. It is an interesting spec. Thank you for posting it.

  • jordan312
    replied
    Voet when I wrote "What every organist wants to see..." I was referring to the organ centerfold.

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  • jordan312
    replied
    With three 32' stops in the specs, I'm sure this installation had at least one and maybe two 30" woofers, in large enclosures. The quality of the pedal tone on the Lp is very impressive.

    Leave a comment:


  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you for sharing the organ and stoplist. My cassette tape was too small to fit the entire thing on it! Mystery solved.

    Michael

  • jordan312
    replied
    The liner notes from the record jacket read as follows "This recording was done on the Rodgers Organ installation at The First Christian Church, Wichita Falls, Texas." Now whether the organ pictured and described is actually the instrument used for the recording, it would be difficult to prove. It is a good sounding instrument considering the era.
    I do like this console style. It has gravitas.

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  • Darth-Car
    replied
    If that is a picture of the Rodgers from the record that may be the second performance organ made by Rodgers built Black Beauty. This organ was not as famous as Black Beauty but did do its fair share of touring, and I believe that there were several different musicians that toured with this organ.

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  • voet
    commented on 's reply
    While this is an interesting specification, it would not be what I would like to see. The Great division is particularly anemic. It would benefit from having a 16' Violone or Principal, possibly a Cornet and I have never liked the idea of a reedless Great division. With 18 ranks of reeds it seems like they could have put a couple of reed stops on the Great division. I also feel that this spec would benefit from a bit more variety in the manual reeds. Rather than having three schalmeis, I would like some different colors like a Cor Anglais, French Horn or possibly a Regal.

    Just my 2 cents.

  • jordan312
    replied
    What every organist wants to see...Click image for larger version

Name:	Rodgers pic spec (2).jpg
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  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Ditto what Toodles said. Allen's reeds have always been good, though–one of the things they do well. Except on the largest models, though, Allen only had Mutations, whereas Rodgers had Mixtures.

    That said, though, when the digital era came, my preferences changed!

    Michael

  • toodles
    replied
    For the larger models of Rodgers and Allen analog organs of that era, I prefer the Rodgers as well--Rodgers seemed to have a faster attack, which lent a liveliness to the sound that the Allen lacked. It was very nice on the flutes and principals, and gave a bite to the reeds. I even had an Allen dealer admit to me that he liked the Rodgers flute better than the analog Allen. Such heresy!

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  • jordan312
    replied
    Well, I really preferred the Rodgers. As both an engineer and and organist, I was trying to justify the differences of acoustics and recording, but the articulation of individual stops and the "fire" in the reeds were superior in the Rodgers. I am very curious how many sets of oscillators were in the Rodgers (which looks like a colonial version of "Black Beauty".) I know the Allen TC4 had four sets and the TC6 had six sets. We don't know if the Allen's were carefully voiced or if they were just floor model/demo units. Both LPs were released by WORD records.

    Leave a comment:


  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    And which did you prefer? Curious minds, and all that!

    Michael

  • jordan312
    replied
    Curious addition to this thread. I had some extra time Thursday and Friday, so I took opportunity to transfer a couple of Don Husted LPs into the computer for CD preservation. (I have a recording studio and do a lot of LP and old RR transfers/restorations.) I transferred DH plays the Majestic Rodgers Organ (1973) and then DH plays Hymns on the Allen Organ (about 1965.) It was interesting to hear the same organists playing his own arrangements on the different analog organs. Both albums include his arrangement of "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling". The Rodgers was installed in a church. The Allens (TC4 and TC6) organs were set up in an organ studio in Chicago so probably had reverb added in the recording process. Quite an amazing difference in the two organs.

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  • beel m
    commented on 's reply
    Small correction... Black Beauty had -14- tone generators and was, IIRC, keyed oscillators. The 990 has -5- of which two are just for celestes (Swell and Choir, one each).
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