Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Looking for a book of preludes and postludes

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Looking for a book of preludes and postludes

    Looking for recommendations for a book of preludes and postludes that are on the difficulty level of the average hymn. These will be for practice use at this time.

    Thanks.
    Hammond RT-3, Estey circa 1903, Baldwin Acrosonic spinet piano, Fender Rhodes Mark I 73 stage piano.

  • #2
    Christopher,

    Are you looking for classical music, or arrangements of hymns, gospel, or contemporary songs? For Liturgical music, I might recommend Bach's Orgelb├╝chlein, which is a collection of chorales (hymns), and then Bach's harmonizations of those chorales.

    Versions of that collection can be downloaded here: https://imslp.org/wiki/Das_Orgel-B%C...ann_Sebastian).

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      Something you might hear in a traditional Catholic or Presbyterian service. The Bach link looks good as well. Thanks.
      Hammond RT-3, Estey circa 1903, Baldwin Acrosonic spinet piano, Fender Rhodes Mark I 73 stage piano.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hmmm. Preludes and Postludes don't have to be hymntune based. Just thought I would put that out there. For a Catholic Church the "Liturgical Organist" series edited by Carlo Rossini is timeless. Works for Episcopal too, of course.
        There is also this: https://www.lorenz.com/keyboard/maga...rgan-portfolio

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ChristopherDB113 View Post
          Something you might hear in a traditional Catholic or Presbyterian service. The Bach link looks good as well. Thanks.
          That still keeps things wide open. The Catholic church would keep things wide open in relation to music used, as long as it is appropriate for that particular portion of the service. For a Presbyterian church, either classical or hymn arrangements would work well.

          There are 10 volumes of music by Paul Manz originally published by Concordia. They would contain pieces that are more or less appropriate. Certain volumes contain more useful pieces than others. The playability varies widely as well.

          Perhaps one of the most playable arrangers I've found is Donald Hustad, and there is a book called The Complete Works of Donald Hustad, published by Hope Publishing Company. Lillenas and Lorenz publishing companies both have nice collections of pieces. Two other arrangers I've used are Eleanor Whitsett & Gayden Sykes (Sikes?) arrangements of hymns. Granted, they are single-arranger collections, but once you become familiar with various arrangers and composers you like, you can find them in compilation works.

          I hope that gets you started.

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

          Comment


          • #6
            These all sound like great suggestions. Thanks to both of your for the quick responses.

            Christopher
            Hammond RT-3, Estey circa 1903, Baldwin Acrosonic spinet piano, Fender Rhodes Mark I 73 stage piano.

            Comment


            • #7
              Christopher,

              Here are a few suggestions.

              Max Reger's 30 Kleine Choralvorspiele These gems are based on tunes that are found in most hymnals in the traditions you specified. Here is the link from IMSLP:

              https://imslp.org/wiki/30_Kleine_Cho...(Reger%2C_Max)

              Healey Willan has three sets of 10 Hymn Preludes that are good. He also has other assorted hymn settings. His pieces are well-written and very useful for church musicians. There are too many to list here, but you can find them at this link to IMSLP:

              https://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Willan%2C_Healey

              Michael's suggestion of Paul Manz's works is excellent, however, you may have to look for used copies, because many of those volumes are out of print. And Bach's Orgelb├╝chlein was my most used collection. Even now in retirement, I really enjoy these gems. They are worth learning and using year after year.

              Finally, a great way to build your music library with great repertoire is by purchasing the 13 volumes in the Augsburg Organ Library. They are a bit pricey, but a great value, since there are so many pieces in each volume They offer a wonderful assortment of pieces based on classic hymns as well as some of the newer additions to most hymnals. They list the difficulty level as "Medium-Difficult" which is beyond the level of hymn playing. However there are some easier pieces in each volume and most of them are no more difficult than Bach's Orgelb├╝chlein. Also this is a collection that you can grow into.

              https://www.augsburgfortress.org/sto...ibrary?lv=true

              I hope this is helpful.

              Bill
              Last edited by voet; 11-19-2019, 04:50 PM.
              Bill

              My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

              Comment


              • #8
                The complete organ works of Guilmant are worth looking at ... and also on IMSLP.

                Also the works of Balbastre, organ works edited by William Carl, and a collection called The Village Organist ... all of these are on IMSLP.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'd recommend these books: 3 graded books for manuals only and 3 with pedals. Preludes, Interludes and postludes.
                  https://global.oup.com/academic/cont...?lang=en&cc=gb

                  Available on Amazon.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'd second the Oxford books above.

                    The Liturgical Organist series of books. Music is organized by key, so it is very useful if you need a piece to transition smoothly with a hymn, anthem or service piece. Volumes are arranged by difficulty.
                    https://www.alfred.com/the-liturgica.../p/00-FE07324/

                    The Church Organist series.
                    https://www.cph.org/p-4445-The-Churc...ist-Vol-1.aspx

                    Hymn Preludes for the Church Year. It is a thick book however, and I have found it doesn't always want to stay open on the music desk.
                    https://www.boosey.com/shop/prod/Hym...stivals/694106

                    Tournemire - L'Orgue mystique. There are easier selections in this cycle. If you are interested in this style, it may be worth going through and selecting pieces at an appropriate difficulty level.
                    https://imslp.org/wiki/L%27Orgue_mys...re%2C_Charles)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by myorgan View Post
                      Christopher,

                      Are you looking for classical music, or arrangements of hymns, gospel, or contemporary songs? For Liturgical music, I might recommend Bach's Orgelb├╝chlein, which is a collection of chorales (hymns), and then Bach's harmonizations of those chorales.

                      Versions of that collection can be downloaded here: https://imslp.org/wiki/Das_Orgel-B%C...ann_Sebastian).

                      Michael
                      Really? You'd call the Orgelbuchlein "on the difficulty level of the average hymn?"

                      Comment


                      • myorgan
                        myorgan commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Originally posted by crapmaster
                        Originally posted by myorgan
                        Christopher,

                        Are you looking for classical music, or arrangements of hymns, gospel, or contemporary songs? For Liturgical music, I might recommend Bach's Orgelb├╝chlein, which is a collection of chorales (hymns), and then Bach's harmonizations of those chorales.

                        Versions of that collection can be downloaded here: https://imslp.org/wiki/Das_Orgel-B%C...ann_Sebastian).

                        Michael
                        Really? You'd call the Orgelbuchlein "on the difficulty level of the average hymn?"
                        It depends on the hymn.

                        Michael

                    • #12
                      Originally posted by crapmaster View Post

                      Really? You'd call the Orgelbuchlein "on the difficulty level of the average hymn?"
                      You've never heard Michael play a hymn have you ...

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I actually have a copy of Orgelbuchlein. A former teacher suggested I buy it, although a majority of the material is pretty advanced for me. Since several have recommended this same book I recently took a look through it and saw a few pieces that looked playable for me. Didn't make an attempt yet though.

                        I do appreciate all the suggestions so far.

                        Christopher
                        Hammond RT-3, Estey circa 1903, Baldwin Acrosonic spinet piano, Fender Rhodes Mark I 73 stage piano.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Great book (#1 is my favorite): Bach's 8 eight short preludes and fugues. https://www.amazon.com/Little-Prelud.../dp/0793572878
                          ÔÇťI play the notes as they are written, but it is God who makes the music.ÔÇŁ - Johann Sebastian Bach
                          Organs I Play:
                          - Allen 2100(T); 1951 M.P. Moller, 3 manual, 55 stop, 28 ranks, (Opus 8152); and 1965 Balcom and Vaughan 3 manual, 34 stops, 25 ranks (Opus 690)

                          Comment


                          • myorgan
                            myorgan commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Christopher,

                            Related to hymn difficulty, the Prelude and Fugue in F Major is, to me, the easiest of the 8. It is relatively simple to play when someone realizes the broken notes of the Prelude are just a chord played in triplets.

                            It would be a good foray into the realm of Classical organ music.

                            Michael

                            P.S. They can be downloaded for free from IMSLP: https://imslp.org/wiki/8_Kleine_Pr%C...ann_Sebastian)

                          • Philip Powell
                            Philip Powell commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I think they are just ever so slightly more difficult than hymns. The first I think is the easiest because it is basic and repetitive. I had only played the organ for 2 weeks and I learned one in a week.

                          • Philip Powell
                            Philip Powell commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Here's another simple piece I like to play because of the fun tempo! https://musescore.com/user/62128/scores/80529

                        • #15
                          Here is a PDF of the first Prelude and Fugue in C Major. Don't mind my teacher's notes (or you can)! They are in individual pages because it wouldn't let me do them together (size limits). You can make them a single PDF yourself. Prelude,FugueCmajor1.pdf Prelude,FugueCmajor2.pdf Prelude,FugueCmajor3.pdf Prelude,FugueCmajor4.pdf
                          ÔÇťI play the notes as they are written, but it is God who makes the music.ÔÇŁ - Johann Sebastian Bach
                          Organs I Play:
                          - Allen 2100(T); 1951 M.P. Moller, 3 manual, 55 stop, 28 ranks, (Opus 8152); and 1965 Balcom and Vaughan 3 manual, 34 stops, 25 ranks (Opus 690)

                          Comment


                          • ChristopherDB113
                            ChristopherDB113 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Yeah, I could play that one.

                          • Philip Powell
                            Philip Powell commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Yep, they're pretty manageable.
                        Working...
                        X