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What mode is this?

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  • Peterboroughdiapason
    commented on 's reply
    Indeed. My post was an attempt to bring some sort of closure - at least on my part!

  • Leisesturm
    replied
    Originally posted by Peterboroughdiapason View Post
    If I were you you I wouldn't concern myself with too much of it, unless you really want make a serious study of chant.
    You do know who you are talking to, right? I am amazed and impressed that you (and others) have been able to hang with him this far down the rabbit hole but I fear this is just the beginning. Better bone up on 12 tone serial composition if you want to stay in the game. Ready player one ...

    Leave a comment:


  • henrik.hank
    replied
    Originally posted by Peterboroughdiapason View Post
    The part you show, with recitation notes, is just the Priest's introduction to the Lord's Prayer. I wouldn't worry about it! Who knows when or how it evolved.

    The Pater Noster itself is in the Mixolydian Mode, as Voet says. It uses a very small range - presumably very early chant. There's nothing in it which could not be in a major scale but it is clearly modal not tonal (look at the cadences).

    It seems to me that a lot of new terminology has been introduced recently (well, in the last 50 years, since I studied music). If I were you you I wouldn't concern myself with too much of it, unless you really want make a serious study of chant.

    could it be that it is not written with the "normal" Mixolydian mode but rather with a psalm tone in Mixolydian?
    What is the reason people hear it as Mixolydian?

    Leave a comment:


  • Peterboroughdiapason
    replied
    The part you show, with recitation notes, is just the Priest's introduction to the Lord's Prayer. I wouldn't worry about it! Who knows when or how it evolved.

    The Pater Noster itself is in the Mixolydian Mode, as Voet says. It uses a very small range - presumably very early chant. There's nothing in it which could not be in a major scale but it is clearly modal not tonal (look at the cadences).

    It seems to me that a lot of new terminology has been introduced recently (well, in the last 50 years, since I studied music). If I were you you I wouldn't concern myself with too much of it, unless you really want make a serious study of chant.


    Leave a comment:


  • henrik.hank
    replied
    Originally posted by voet View Post
    I believe it is church mode 7 (Mixolydian).
    But Myxolydian has D as the recitation on Re which would be D if we sing in the key of G.
    so how can this be Mixolydian?

    Leave a comment:


  • voet
    replied
    I believe it is church mode 7 (Mixolydian).

    Leave a comment:


  • henrik.hank
    started a topic What mode is this?

    What mode is this?

    Does anyone know what mode this is??? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPSs1DU31Yo
    It beginns with two recitation tones. I have never heard of a mode with two recitation tones. one could probolay say that these two notes are RE and MI. The finalis would be on Do. one could probobaly see it as a finalis on SOL. that would be another way of seeing it. I could use the modern system and say that RE and MI are in fact LA and TI but we don't have any TI in Gregorian chant theory. It sounds very major to me. What mode is it?
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