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  • Using your zimblestern...



    I did a quick search of the archives and didn't find any threads similar to this one. I'm also going to place a similar post in the "classical" forum for additional suggestions for using the zimblestern in organ literature...</P>


    For the first time in many, many years I am at a church that has an organ with alovely zimblestern.Neither ofmy two predecessors ever used this feature and members of the congregation have asked meto occasionally use it (the zimblesternwas given as a memorial by along-time choir member). I've used the zimblestern on several hymns (for example, "Fairest Lord Jesus" on the verse with the text "And all the twinkling starry host"). At Christmas we used "Angels We Have Heard on High" as the Hymn of Praise/Glory to God and I used the zimblestern on the "Gloria" refrain. These are pretty predictable uses of the zimblestern and I'd like to"break out of the box" a bit.</P>


    So, I'm looking for some suggestions. How have you used a zimblestern to enhance the accompaniment of your congregation's song? What's worked and what's turned out to be "trite"?</P>


    Many thanks!</P>


    Krum</P>

  • #2
    Re: Using your zimblestern...



    My cymbelstern is located under the Great wind chest, so is relatively mild.</P>


    I'm afraid that I don't use it all that often - mainly on the various settings of In dulci jubilo.</P>


    I like to use it during "What Child is This" (GREENSLEEVES) for the verse that begins with 'So bring Him incense, gold and myrrh'.</P>


    I use it for the entire verse, and make sure to let it play through the last chord.</P>

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    • #3
      Re: Using your zimblestern...

      This is a copy of the other, identical thread...
      <DIV class=ForumPostContentText id=ctl00_ctl01_bcr_ctl00___PostRepeater_ctl01_Post ViewWrapper>


      I serve a Lutheran congregation and so have those liturgical pointsin the service. I use our bells during the Sanctus on festival Sundays. I've also used it in during the hymn of praise, which follows the Kyrie. I could also hear it during the Alleluia verse almost anytime. In a non-liturgicalsetting I'd suggest using it while the kiddos came forward for the children's sermon, while playing "Jesus loves me" on a 4' flute. (Not every week though!)</P>


      I've used it in literature in lots of ways. The transcription of Bach's "Sheep May Safely Graze" is a good example.Think pastoral setting here.I think some of the Handel transcriptions would lend themselves to its use. Of course a lot depends on how tinkly or clanky it sounds! Ours is comprised of small brass india bells, so it's sweet. I've heardone around town sound like hubcaps strung together, without much pitch!!! Over all, I use it like I do herbs when I cook... a little sprinkle is lovely as long as you don't overpower the main ingrediant. </P></DIV>

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      • #4
        Re: Using your zimblestern...



        If the Zimbelstern on your organ has a volume control, I think it would work very well with "Silent Night." I would set it at a softer level for this.</p>

        The only thing to be careful with is if the bells of your Zimbelstern are tuned to certain pitches, you don't want it to clash with the key you're playing in. So if that's the case, it might work out to determine those pitches, if possible, and transpose accordingly. An untuned Zimbelstern will work with any key.
        </p>

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        • #5
          Re: Using your zimblestern...

          I play for a Lutheran church and I use the Zimbelstern on the final stanza of any hymn that has a doxological final stanza. My congregation knows to stand to sing those stanzas and the zimbelstern is sort of a signal for them. Our new hymnal has an indication for those stanzas, but our older ones did not. I also use it for the Sanctus on festival days.
          Regards, Larry

          At Home : Yamaha Electones : EX-42 ( X 3 !!! ), E-5AR, FX-1 ( X 2 !! ), US-1, EL-25 ( Chopped ). Allen 601D, ADC 6000D. Lowrey CH32-1. At Churches I play for : Allen Q325 ( with Vista ), Allen L123 ( with Navigator ). Rodgers 755. 1919 Wangerin 2/7 pipe organ.

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          • #6
            Re: Using your zimblestern...



            Diane Bish often uses it when performing her arrangement of "Come Thou Fount."</P>


            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzrzSrcGFZc</P>
            <P mce_keep="true"></P>

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            • #7
              Re: Using your zimblestern...

              I'm pleased to hear that she does, But why, and how come ? I do think we are looking for reasons here after all.
              Regards, Larry

              At Home : Yamaha Electones : EX-42 ( X 3 !!! ), E-5AR, FX-1 ( X 2 !! ), US-1, EL-25 ( Chopped ). Allen 601D, ADC 6000D. Lowrey CH32-1. At Churches I play for : Allen Q325 ( with Vista ), Allen L123 ( with Navigator ). Rodgers 755. 1919 Wangerin 2/7 pipe organ.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Using your zimblestern...



                [quote user="Larrytow"]I'm pleased to hear that she does, But why, and how come ?[/quote]</P>


                Perhaps as a representation of a fountain? Just my unprofessional opinion. Personally, I've never found a good use for a Zimblestern I felt comfortable with.</P>


                Michael</P>
                Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

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                • #9
                  Re: Using your zimblestern...



                  [quote user="Larrytow"]I'm pleased to hear that she does, But why, and how come ? I do think we are looking for reasons here after all.
                  [/quote]</P>


                  I have no way of knowing what was going through Ms. Bish's mind when she selected her registration. Perhaps she thought the Zimbelstern added a touch of whimsy to a light, airy arrangement. I posted a YouTube link hoping to let her performance speak for itself.</P>
                  <P mce_keep="true"></P>
                  <P mce_keep="true"></P>

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                  • #10
                    There is some evidence to suggest Bach used a zimblestern in his setting of In Dir ist Freude (Orgelbuchlein).

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                    • #11
                      >> There is some evidence to suggest Bach used a zimblestern in his setting of In Dir ist Freude (Orgelbuchlein).

                      Is there? I'd be interested to know more about that, please.

                      It's sometimes suggested that he used a glockenspiel (he had one added to the Muhlhausen organ).
                      Last edited by Peterboroughdiapason; 05-22-2013, 11:35 PM.

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                      • #12
                        I sometimes add the zimbelstern to the final measure of a chorale, such as Buxtehude's "Nun Bitten Wir."

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                        • #13
                          I have never actually used a zimbelstern in performance. There are loads of nice ones out there, but they just don't get me excited. Part of the problem is probably that I can't control them closely; a person ringing bells can vary the pitch, volume and rate at will, but often I'll find organists use zimbelstern in A during a piece in B-flat of E-flat. Yuck. Organists want everything under their control (let us choose which stops to use, let us move the swell pedals at will, let us conduct and yell at the choir), so it seems odd that they'd entrust the blessed racket that is a bell stop to a machine that isn't even hearing the music it needs to enhance.
                          Glockenspiel stops are a different story. The at least pitch and rate are controlled directly by the organist, and the result is often charming. Though for Bach, many organists would hesitate (including me).
                          As of 7/16/2013, no longer active on forum.
                          Practice hard, practice well.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by soubasse32 View Post
                            I'm afraid that I don't use it all that often - mainly on the various settings of [i]In dulci jubilo.
                            Our Organist also uses it with that piece. https://www.box.com/files#/files/0/f...1/f_368913666/

                            She does occasionally use it for other things, but there doesn't seem to be a pattern with it.

                            David

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                            • #15
                              When Virgil Fox toured with his big Rodgers, he had a place where the music stopped. He turned on the bench and pointed his finger - a light came on over the zimblestern as it played. After it was through, the light went off and the stage lights came back up. Then Fox went back to business.

                              Whimsy is as good a descriptive word for it as I can think of. .

                              I can see that it might be used during brief scene changes for something like a Nativity play. But I've never seen organ music that actually called for it. I'm not saying no music ever did. I just haven't seen it myself.

                              Bach On
                              Make being happy a way of traveling, not just a destination.

                              Church organ - 2 manual 12 rank Estey Pipe Organ with 12 Artisan Digital Stops
                              Home organ - Allen R-230 organ (We also have 48 pipes in a facade)
                              We have a Yamaha 6' 8" Grand
                              Have used an older Korg T3 keyboard and MIDI for doing musical arrangements.
                              I'm a Methodist organist.
                              I taught high school chorus, elementary music and middle school music.
                              Became a Technology Specialist.
                              Retired from Education after 32 years.

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