Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fingering

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fingering

    How would you finger the first bar in the right hand? I am doing 35, 13, 24, 35 then jumping 35 up to the G+B. Thanks.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3660.jpg
Views:	152
Size:	471.5 KB
ID:	792973

    Attached Files

  • #2
    What's your goal? Do you want to be able to play full legato for the upper voice, or simply avoid that jump? Have you thought about letting the left hand help with the alto?

    Comment


    • myorgan
      myorgan commented
      Editing a comment
      I 2nd Andrea's suggestion of having the left hand help with the Alto.

      Michael

  • #3
    Fingering groups could/should match the rhythm - one hand position per dotted quarter. Result 35-13-24 \ 13-35-24 \ 35-13.

    With a slight modification, it can be fingered completely legato. Remember that a white-note scale can be played in thirds 13-24-13-24-13-24, etc. in a perfect legato, once you allow 1 to reach under 2 and 3 to reach over 4. In that case, and by adding one finger substitution, you can play my first suggestion completely legato with one change: 35-13-24 \ 13-35-24 \ 13 (change from 1 to 2) -12.

    A caution about your initial finger suggestion - if you have two 35's next to each other, there is a danger that the second one will be played with an accent, either because it's on the piano* and it will struck louder as you jump, or on the organ because you will have cut the first 35 short (giving an apparent reduction in volume) so that you can get to the next 35 on time. Either way, watch out that you don't create an acCENT on the wrong sylLABle.

    *The piano does give us the option of using the damper pedal, but we should still watch that our fingerings don't get in the way of correct accentuation.

    Comment


    • #4
      For legato sounding lines, often what is needed is the perception of legato, not a literal joining of every single note. Added to that, one can use clues from phrase direction and text to inform how one employs the legato and the location of any breaks or breaths in phrase. It is possible to perceive a legato line, while at the same time including small breaks that follow naturally occurring accents formed by the metre, rhythm, and syllabic emphasis.

      Some suggestions:

      With 4 to 3 substitution
      23, 12, 13, 24-23, 35, 24 | 13, 12

      With a break between the 3rd and 4th eighths
      23, 12, 13, 13, 35, 24 | 13, 12

      Can insert a break between 5th and 6th eighths. Works with the syllabic emphasis on verse 1 and 3.
      23, 12, 13, 24, 45, 24 | 13, 12

      With a 3 over 4 cross
      15, 23, 14, 23, 35, 24 | 13, 12

      Also consider this, if you were soloing the melody on a different manual the fingering would likely be:
      3, 1, 2, 3, 5, 4, 3, 1
      It is a lot closer to the fingering patterns above that start with 23, compared to the understandable initial inclination to start the pattern with 35. This means less patterns to think about, and more focus can be directed to the music.

      Comment


      • #5
        I played with this before looking at other people's fingering. If I start with 42 instead of 53, I can play the entire measure with one thumb finger slide to the next note, and one pinky finger slide, giving;
        42, 21, 31, 42, 54, 53, | 42, 21 | 31, 41, 21 | 31 sub to 21.
        This leaves your fingers ready for the next line starting again with 42.
        Ed Kennedy
        Current Organs - Conn 645 Theater, 1861 Smith Melodeon

        Comment

        Working...
        X