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Ancient Troubadour's Slickest yet

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  • Rock & Roll: Ancient Troubadour's Slickest yet

    The holidays enabled some decent recording time.

    The result was a good commercial sound, probably the slickest tune yet from this source!

    Leslie mic and recording details below the vid:



    Though the leslie was close mic'd with three mics I panned the horns only slightly left and right, so essentially a mono recording.

    The leslie sound in this recording is closer to the 70's funk sounds than I've managed before for several reasons:

    Closeness of mic: virtually touching the horn but for the wind shield. This was literally a pair of woollen socks, one rolled and wrapped around the end of each mic.
    The Left mic was well inside the leslie, perpendicular to the horn's axis and nearly on top of the belt tensioner's anchor, the other was hard right and only just inside the cabinet.

    Type of mic: for the horn I decided to switch from large diaphragm condensers to plain old cardioid dynamics for one special reason:

    The proximity effect.

    It turns out that while condensers are great at picking up absolutely everything and that they don't get bassier as they get closer to the source...

    ...that's also why they're not as great for getting that jelly wobble sound of a close mic'd horn!

    The dynamic mic gets a dynamically different sound as the horn rips past it from when it approaches and runs away. So the ol' famed doppler effect gets increased by close mic'ing with two dynamics.
    That's the sound you get in rock and blues recordings which you don't quite get in the room with a real leslie.

    I don't know if by squashing them into almost mono decreases the dual mic effect slightly, but there you have it.

    A large diaphragm condenser was on the bass rotor, right hard onto the louvres on the right hand side looking from the back. This is the closest point the rotor comes to the louvres, so it's a good spot.

    The wind from the horns was quite fierce even though I had socks on the mics. A bit of EQ was necessary to knock that out.

    Bass guitar:
    Direct in but almost all of the frequencies above halfway were cut right out in order to fit it into the right place in the mix.

    Accordion: large diaphragm mic close to the vents on the piano-keyboard side. The bass buttons weren't used.

    Electric drums: mono direct in, highest frequencies dropped to go for a slightly older sound.

    Guitar: condenser to centre of the 12' with whizzer cone. This amp uses two ex-hammond spinet speakers.
    The one with the whizzer cone is excellent close mic'd for fuzz guitar, the other cone for regular guitar.

    From a distance the whizzer cone has no effect on the amp tone, only close up.

    That's about it.
    Oh, yeah...
    and VOICE: Plain ol' regular variety as usual.
    -1958 Hofner 550 archtop guitar -1959 C3 and PR40- -1964 Busillachio Harmonium- -1964 M101-
    -1967ish Leslie 122- -1975 T500 (modded..chopped, and reassembled!)-
    -DIY 760 FrankenLeslie/rat hideout-
    -1980 Electrokey Electric Piano- -Yamaha electric Harmonium (early 80's?)-
    -1990 Jansen GMF150 amp- -1992 Korg 01W/fd- -1992 G&L S-500 geetar.

  • #2
    I am going to have to try your Leslie mic technique there. The sound is the real deal. Seriously.
    Now, does your cabinet have its deflectors or not? Harder to tell on tremolo for me at least. My guess is "no" it does not, but it's just a guess.

    A few constructive criticisms for whatever they're worth. This track needs quite a tight groove and I'm feeling it doesn't have it. It was the biggest jarring thing for me listening. Now that it's after the fact, a little old daw wizardry can work some true black magik! (That album of mine you were just listening to, you probably don't want to know how shamelessly I re-arranged timing of everything to comp for my band's under-preparedness in the studio. Including myself. Let's just say many hundreds of hours of manual time alignment no joke.) I'm hearing an opportunity to keep the vocals more present if you just automate some additional gain before your fx chain on those syllables that seem to tail out. Finally, I'm not so sure you need a stereo organ for this track, but certainly could get more adventurous with the overall panning. Those things, I think you'll have a very pleasing mix and a groovy ditty going on.

    Cheers!
    www.facebook.com/thelongblackveils
    Rock-melting-pot from Selma, CA. Second album "In the Dark" available on iTunes, Amazon, etc.

    Conn Caprice 432, Hammond A-100, Leslie 860, Needham NY reed organ, Fender-Rhodes MkI Stage 88, midi-controller until I can get a Mellotron.
    Melodica, flute, tenor sax, and mandolin.

    Comment


    • #3
      Cheers!
      The ol' latency seems to change on different days of the week, too. Makes the whole thing a lark to line up, on TOP of 100% loose playing.

      The Horn on this one does have the deflectors tho. I bought replacement horns from Tonewheelgeneral a while back. They were only plastic rather than the original bakelite horns but seem to do the trick.
      I vaguely remember A/B-ing and thinking there may have been more Frequency modulation with the deflectors while there was more Volume (amplitude) oscillation without.
      -1958 Hofner 550 archtop guitar -1959 C3 and PR40- -1964 Busillachio Harmonium- -1964 M101-
      -1967ish Leslie 122- -1975 T500 (modded..chopped, and reassembled!)-
      -DIY 760 FrankenLeslie/rat hideout-
      -1980 Electrokey Electric Piano- -Yamaha electric Harmonium (early 80's?)-
      -1990 Jansen GMF150 amp- -1992 Korg 01W/fd- -1992 G&L S-500 geetar.

      Comment


      • #4
        It would seem to reason that removing deflectors sacrifices FM for AM.
        www.facebook.com/thelongblackveils
        Rock-melting-pot from Selma, CA. Second album "In the Dark" available on iTunes, Amazon, etc.

        Conn Caprice 432, Hammond A-100, Leslie 860, Needham NY reed organ, Fender-Rhodes MkI Stage 88, midi-controller until I can get a Mellotron.
        Melodica, flute, tenor sax, and mandolin.

        Comment

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