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    Eddie Dunstedter

    Eddie was born in Missouri in 1897 and died in California in 1974 if the information that I have checked is correct. He would have been about 56 when Donovan's Brain was released. There was another film composer with the same last name, but he was Max, and he does not show up as anything other as a film composer except on one web site with UCLA. I would make a pretty good guess that the Donovan's Brain composer was probably Eddie. Dale at decaplin@aol.com

    #2
    Re: Eddie Dunstedter

    <font color="red">This message was originally posted by <user>dec</user> . It is being reposted here to maintain proper threading.</font>

    In an attempt to find out something more about his composing, I asked Glen Pratt in Salt Lake City. Glen was with Conn for years and worked with some of the best. Glen says that Eddie wrote music for several films. So, probably Donovan's Brain was one of them.
    -Admin

    Allen 965
    Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
    Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
    Hauptwerk 4.2

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      #3
      Re: Eddie Dunstedter

      <font color="red">This message was originally posted by <user>dec</user> . It is being reposted here to maintain proper threading</font>

      Well, I think I finally found out the answer about his film work in a book that I own. Here goes:

      He was a native of the midwest, who showed an ealy interest in the organ. As a teenager, Eddie went to work for the Kilgen Organ factory, where he not only helped erect the instruments before final shipment, but demonstrated their capabilites to prospective customers. By the time both this century and Eddie had reached their twenties, his career had commenced. His first big theatre opportunity came at the Capitol Theatre in St. Paul, Minnesota. From here it was only a short time before he was called to appear at the Garrick, the State, and finally at the large four manual Wurlitzer located in the 4,400 seat deluxe Minnesota Theatre. Radio made Eddie a national celebrity when he was engaged to play the WCCO studio Wurlitzer and conduct an orchestra in a program known as "The Gold Medal Fast Freight". He was heard over the CBS radio network from coast to coast, being introduced with the slogan, "The Master Makes Melody". From here, Eddie was called to Hollywood to both play the organ and serve as musical director for many top shows. Among the productions on which he worked were "Suspense", "Johnnie Dollar", "The Lineup" and others too numerous to mention. As these shows moved to television, Eddie moved with them. During this time, he also started scoring and directing for motion pictures. Throughout his career, he was no stranger to the recording studios. Ove two million copies of his record for the Brunswick label, "The World Is Waiting For The Sunrise", were sold and his record of "Gold Mine in the Sky" with Bing Crosby is among the legendary bestsellers of all time. Retirement meant nothing to him, as he continued diving concerts and making recording until shortly before his death. His theme, "Open Your Eyes" has become one of today's standards and is heard wherever organists congregate.
      -Admin

      Allen 965
      Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
      Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
      Hauptwerk 4.2

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        #4
        Re: Eddie Dunstedter

        There is a copy of Eddie Dunstedter's broadcast opening the KNX/CBS Hollywood organ in 1938 on my Virtual Radiogram website: http://theatreorgans.com/southerncro...m/USAfiles.htm

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          #5
          Re: Eddie Dunstedter

          This is really a marvelous site. If you love theatre organs, you need to make a visit.

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