Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do you love your crescendo pedal?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • telemanr
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    Why leave the crescendo pedal off your Hauptwerk setup? It is completely programmable with 40 stages (at least on the St. Anne's organ that comes with Version 2.) And you can save 8 complete setups and recall them with piston if you wanted to. Very flexible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bombarde32
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    This was very handy for me on Sunday. I had the choir anthem (piano), offertory(piano) and then a hymn (organ).

    I didn't even think about it until I was into the offertory but I hadn't opened up the hymnal or turned on any stops. So I was going to have to climb up to the organ (well, it's not THAT far away), get to the hymn and then scan the stops for which ones I wanted. Instead, I just hopped up, got to the hymn and popped the pedal on halfway to start playing. Then I just turned it up slowly until I got to the mix/volume I wanted. It was useful in avoiding a large dead spot in the service while everyone was waiting on me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Organmaster1
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    This pedal is one of my favorite parts of an organ. I usually use it while holding the last chord/note of a song or the second to last for dramatic effect.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bombarde32
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    Squeaking sound is usually two things rubbing together that shouldn't be!

    A hinge or other part may just need lubricated with a grease. Your technician should be able to do it if you don't want to start hurling grease around inside your console :O)

    Leave a comment:


  • MD1032
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    Well, I think I like my crescendo pedal a little more now that I've used it. I used it for the recent offeratory thing I did and used it to increase the volume ever so slightly. It brought in exactly the ranks I needed for a little increase in volume. But man when I was practicing, if I wasn't careful the stupid thing brought in 1/3 of the darn great. Really, the pedal only sounds like it has about four positions - off, really quiet, somewhat loud, somewhat louder, and moderately loud. Not to mention it makes an awful squeaking sound. Could this be a mechanical problem a technician could fix? I'm working on getting to know the organ tuner.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moller4/79
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    The Reuter/Parkey that I play regularly has an SSO/SSL action with 4 programmable crescendo sequences - 1 preset and 3 adjustable. I rarely, if ever, set sequences because it is a PAIN! it has to be done step-by-step which takes a lot of time. On the Moller that I also play, because it has not been solid-stated, there is only one fixed crescendo sequence that I am pretty happy with.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rampant Wonder
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    I'm definitely not a fan of the crescendo pedal on the organ at my church. The console is a 1950's Casavant and as such, while I'm sure the pedal could be reprogrammed, it's not something I can do. The problem, as with Tutti's organ, is that one of the very first additions that the pedal makes is ranks of reeds that are extremely jarring. It's a sudden leap from mezzopiano to forte which is just... ick.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlanA
    replied
    Re: Do you love your creshendo pedal?

    I agree with your set up of the crescendo pedal. The small unit organ I play now throughs on the oboe too soon and adds the Swell 16' Bourdon. The oboe is too soon and the 16' Bourdon makes it too muddy. What gets me about these small pipe organs I have played in my area (even a larger 2 manual orchestral pipe with a 3rd manual Echo), the crescendo doesn't add the Great/Great 4' coupler.

    At my service yesterday, I was playing a piece, Antiphon, a bit edgie. I have 5 manual pistons for GR & SW. I used most all of them to build up from the Echo Vox Humanna through all the strings, fluets, oboe, but used the crescendo to pull on the 8' Great Diapason. The last Great piston added that GR/GR 4' coupler. But to keep my hands free to move from chord to chord during the build up, the crescendo came in handy to add the last big stop.

    Yes, the only large stop on this small Moller, is the 8' Open Diapason on the Great.

    Boy would I like to change this organ.

    Now the same piece played on my Allen Q345 with the crescendo sounded phonominal .

    AlanA

    Leave a comment:


  • soundboarddude
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    There was a Cotner organ that I play quite a bit (well, not quite so much anymore) that had a crescendo shoe. It has a little screen (for pistons mainly) but it would tell you how much was playing, by like 'p' for piano, 'f' for forte, etc.

    When you slowly built up to fortisitisimo (fff, or was it ffff), it was heavenly! The organ is always out of tune though, so you can't hardly do anything with it. But when you built up, it all blended together and would shake the floor (even though the lowest pitch was 16')!

    Of course, that organ had more ciphers than it had pipes - and every time I'd get in to a piece (with or without the crescendo pedal) I'd start hearing extra notes! I never could figure out what pipes they were though... I tried to sit down and play though the notes to find them...

    Darn ciphers...

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    I have only ever played on two organs with a crescendo pedal. One was on a Harrison & Harrison organ and it did absolutely nothing. The second one was on an electric Makin organ which was fantastic!

    Leave a comment:


  • LifeWithLoopy
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    Some of the really new organs, have crecendos that are programmable through a little screen, and, there is a little LED display that says how many stops are currently turned on. But, these organs are few and far between.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Gilbert
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    Love my Crescendo pedal???, I wouldn't go that far. But I do find it quite a servicable feature on my Wicks. I not only use it for service playing, but also in concert work.

    I have 10 programmable General pistons that provide adequate flexibility for most service playing. However, I find that reserving 2 of those for Offertory, 2 for Choral presentation, 1 for solo accompaniament limits the range of the remaining 5. Often I use 6 though 10 for Congregational singing with 9 and 10 adding all but 3 of the heavy reeds that Tutti or SFZ adds. 10 adds 2 voices from the principals that the crescendo pedal does not add.

    Now, how the Crescendo works for me is this. Starting with General 6, with full Crescendo, I might solo voice an introduction using the great accompanied by the choir organ. Then closing the crescendo, move to the great and accompany the first verse of a hymn. Then using preset 5 with the Fanfare/Festival Trumpet on the great and flutes and strings on the Choir, solo voice the second verse. If the Hymn has a chorus, I will open the crescendo, move both hands to the choir. Third verse, preset 7, close the crescendo, move to the great. Chorus accompanied by opening the crescendo about 1/2. After a key change, the fourth verse, preset 8, crescendo closed opening throughout based on phrasing to about 2/3rd's, then chorus preset 9, continueing to open the crescendo to full, with the last phrase or amen played on preset 10.

    While my Crescendo is programmable, it is not something that can be done during a service or program since it requires opening the console and physically moving pegs. What has guided me in the structure is this. Strings 8' first, flutes 8, couplers 8, strings 4, soft principals 8, flutes 4, vox and other soft reeds 8, couplers 4, flutes 2, soft principals 4, heavy principals 8, medium reeds 8, medium reeds 4, heavy principals 4, heavy principals 2, mixtures III and IV, heavy reeds 8. The last addition of the crescendo pedal is Bombarde (tuba) 16 in the pedal. Tutti adds its 32' extension and the Fanfare 16 to the pedal and Fanfare 4 to the Great. Fanfare 8 is not added to the great under any condition. It is strictly used for a solo stop because of its voicing.

    I cannot imagine that I would have traded having the Crescendo pedal. However, if it wasn't there, I would find work arounds.

    Regards,

    Mark Gilbert

    Leave a comment:


  • dec
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    I have never used a crescendo pedal except toward the final stages of a really big opening hymn. If I used it during a quiet moment, although I can't see the congregation from the balcony, I'm sure that they would probably jump 18" out of their seats. Hope it works for you! dec

    Leave a comment:


  • AlanG
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    Dear back52887,
    I use it sparingly on pipe organs, but on the occasions when I do need it, it is indispensable.
    A lot depends on the quality of the cr. pedal -- on the choice of stops brought into play.
    On the Wicks 32-rank organ I now have access to, the effect is quite artistic with certain
    types of music, provided you know when to stop depressing the pedal.

    I use it as a last resort to adjust the overall volume when hands and feet are all busy. I typically have set a quiet registration for a soft passage, then add (all at once) a little crescendo for an abruptly contrasting passage, then go back to the "home" registration. If the piece is leading up to a stormy minor episode, the cr. pedal is effective in heavier doses added gradually. There will be a change in tone color, but this is often welcome. In general, softer stops should be added first. If programmable, like stops should be added first, then progressively louder ones.

    When Simon Nieminski performed on this organ, he found a striking use of the cr. pedal -- to mimic the blooming effect of bagpipes playing now louder, now softer.

    I do not use it for hymns (there's always time to change stops by piston between verses), and rarely if ever in Bach. Maybe in Mendelssohn though...

    Also, on the Allen *digital* organ I used to play at church, there were some interesting solo stops -- such as the 16-foot quintaden on the great -- that were too soft to have much effect at the normal volume setting, but which became eloquent when played with the cr. pedal all the way down. Of course, on a digital organ you can have a true crescendo not possible on a pipe organ.

    Leave a comment:


  • JJSPenfl
    replied
    Re: Do you love your crescendo pedal?

    I love a good crescendo pedal, I have played the large 8 division rodgers at Pensacola Christian College and it had a feature that enabled the stops to move in and out as you used the pedal. My practice Allen does not have one and I miss it.

    Jon

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X