This is way more of a project than one person can pull off along, but I seriously would like to buy this organ. I simply do not have the space to install it nor the manpower to disassemble and store it alone, so my next option is to find a worthy home for it and enough people living in or willing to travel to northern California who appreciate quality classic organs to save this working ensemble from the cannibal parts distributors. The clock is ticking on this masterpiece.





There has been a lot of talk about regarding the relative merits or demerits of the old analog organs. But I tended to dismiss them as relatively sentimental memories of times past until I recently heard a 1962 Allen analog organ which sounded amazing, especially considering its age. Frankly, I had a hard time believing it was such old technology until I toured the racks of tone generators in a small room up front under the speakers.





Here this for yourself (listen to 480 version, the organ actually sounds better than YouTube video- I am still trying to find the optimal YouTube audio codec and will update the link below when I do, but this will give you the idea for now):


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVcJAGR4eI


See "More Info" to the right of the video, and also this post earlier on the organ forum with more details:





http://organforum.com/forums/post/105834.aspx




Still pictures of the tone generator racks, combination action, etc (be sure to stay in the "Custom Allen" album and not confuse with my other organ):


http://anim8.com/G2/main.php?g2_itemId=2096





Please email me if you have ideas, suggestions, or know a large church that could use this beautiful instrument. There will be considerable effort involved in moving it, but there is no reason to think this organ could not continue playing for generations as it has for the last 5 decades.