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Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

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  • Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

    Is there any tonal difference between the Trompette and the en Chamade? Or is it just the fact that it's mounted horizontally, which may make it sound louder?

  • #2
    Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

    The fact that it is mounted outside the case may make it sound different as well. I have played an organ, that had the Trompette en Chamade, located over the door, in the back of the chapel. My word, was it loud. I have never played a Trompette that was placed inside of the case. The organ I practice on has a Trompette stop, and there are Trompettes inside the Swell division, however, when they were refurbishing the sanctuary, some klutz went up in there, and stepped on the trompettes, so, I cannot speak for those.

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    • #3
      Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

      So really, other than the loudness, there really isn't any tonal difference? I've never played an organ that had both so I'm curious if it's just the fact that they're mounted differently...

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      • #4
        Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

        While en Chamade merely refers to their location, something tells me most organ builders make them sound different--i.e. louder. I've heard softer trompettes that are close to hautbois, but never are softer en chamade.
        Finally self-published some of my compositions! https://www.createspace.com/3734555
        Piano and organ videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/CurtisBooksMusic

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        • #5
          Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

          In any vertical trompette, even those unenclosed, the sound must reflect off some surface before reaching the listener, with a consequent muting and mixing of some harmonics, be it ever so slight. The direct pipe-to ear contact of the horizontal trompette will result in a brighter and clearer as well as a lounder tone, IMHO.

          Lee

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          • #6
            Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

            I agree completly with Lee. I've never played a Festival trompette that was as bright as a Chamade.

            Don

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            • #7
              Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

              I agree with Don, who in turn agrees with Lee, and I, too, have never played a Festival Trompette or a Fanfare Trumpet (a hooded festival) that has the brightness or intensity of an en Chamade, even when built to the same scale and on the same wind pressure. The design idea behind the en Chamade is that it unobstructedly focuses the sound towards the listener.

              To get the perspective, simply have someone sustain a note while you listen from outside the chamber while moving into the chamber directly over the sounding pipe. You will hear a completely different sound from the vertical Trompette heard from the outside of the chamber and that which is coming from the top of the pipe as you listen from above. The vertical Trompette will be clearer and brighter.

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              • #8
                Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

                Interesting.... hmmmm...

                I may e-mail a few organ builders to see what they say as well

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                • #9
                  Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

                  Well, I just did a "side by side comparison today, and now, I shall do my report. I played an organ today that has an 8' Trumpet in the swell division, one in the choir division, and, it has a "Festival Trumpet" which is the en Chamade. Now, would anyone like to explain to me why an organ would have 2 IDENTICAL ranks of trumpets, in 2 different divisions? Wouldnt one enclosed trumpet do? The Festival Trumpet was bright, clear, and very very very loud. Best saved for special occasions, such as weddings. The enclosed trumpets were not quite as clear, and not near as loud. It is obvious which one is in the case, and which one is outside. For regular playing, the regular trumpet would be best, not quite as loud and "ear piercing" at times, but, it still stands out. Wow, I just enlightened myself.

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                  • #10
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                    • #11
                      Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

                      Well, I thought it was duplexed, till I pulled both trumpet stops, played middle C on both, and there are, indeed, 2 ranks of trumpets. They may be voiced differently though. I will ask the guy who headed up the organ comittee, he would know, he put it there.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

                        Yes, they are on two different sides. Actually, there are 4 ranks of trumpets, one in the Great, one in the Choir, one in the pedal, and one in the Swell. The swell and the choir are on different sides of the organ. I think the pedal trumpet is a bit louder. The Solo has the en Chamade. I never did get ahold of the organ comittee guy. I will continue trying though, because I am dead curious, about why they did that.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

                          The Spanish organs of the 16-1700s with their Trompeta Real (royal trumpet) and Trompeta de Batalla (Battle trumpet) that inspired the French "en chamade" reeds of the 1800s were designed to play a unique genre of music called "Batallas" in which spanish victories were celebrated by compositions in which trumpet calls of the opposing sides were played on opposet sides of the instrument, frequently via a divided clavier. These trumpet stops would range from 16'-2' in the treble and 8'-1' in the bass, and were usually regals rather than length=pitch stops like we use today. Multiple reeds in contrasting divisions on a large modern organ can play this exciting old music, and possibly your original designers had this in mind.

                          BTW the flue stops on those spanish organs were not built to be used with the reed division,s their tunnings did not even match. Anyone more knowledgeable than my old memory tapes is welcome to jump in.

                          Lee

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                          • #14
                            Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

                            The Reuter I take lessons on has a Trumpet in the Swell that's quite nice and a Festival Trumpet that's mounted horizontally in the Choir. The Festival Trumpet is louder and brighter. The organ doesn't cary well through the room unfortunately.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Trompette vs. Trompette en Chamade

                              I believe Audsley wrote that a German organ will have a Trompette stop in every division, and that it often is the only reed found in some. Even though the names may be the same, it is quite likely that they will be voiced somewhat differently so as to provide some contrast in tone and/or loudness.

                              David

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