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    Cavaille-Coll Actions

    Hello
    I am new to the Organforum, I tried posting this message before, it wound up in a more general discussion. So I thought I would try posting it here.
    I am in the process of designing a pipe organ for my home. I wanted to try using Barker Levers for my couplers (otherwise the action is tracker).
    I have been unable to locate any specific information about Barker Levers. Does anyone have specific measurements of the conveyences and other parts of the pneumatics that you could share with me.
    Thank you for your help.
    Dr. Bill

    #2
    I seem to recall that the Fisk Organ Company uses their own version of a Barker Lever. Perhaps they might agree to share some information with you? You might also try contacting Lyle Blackinton in San Diego County, California.

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      #3
      The Kowalyshyn Servo-pneumatic Lever is described here:

      http://www.cbfisk.com/do/DisplayArti...s/articleId/58

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        #4
        There is something on Barkers in Audsley. I would advise against them as they often are noisy in action.

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          #5
          Why use Barker Levers for the coupling? those mechanisms were designed to overcome the resistance of high(er) wind pressures and the large pallet sizes necessary in BIG pipe organs where LOTS of ranks are planted on the various windchests, particularly when they were coupled. Even on a moderately sized 2-manual organ on moderate (3.5 inch) wind pressures, it should not be necessary to use mechanical supplements...to do this will mean that you lose the (supposed) connection to the key pallets you desire in a mechanical action. If you want to see a phot of the barker levers (shown in part), go to the photos section of the website for the St. Sulpiece organ...these mechanisms take up a lot of space, and can be pretty noisy (listen to some of Daniel Roth's performances at St Sulpiece that are found on YouTube!).

          Rick in VA

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            #6
            Unfortunately the CBFisk site does not contain any dimensions. Thanks though

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              #7
              Thanks, I've studied that section of Audsley carefully, unfortunately he didn't include a scale with the drawing.

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                #8
                Good points. I have played several tracker instruments in various church jobs and must question the vallidity of the connection provided by trackers. On the weight of touch if you figure the pallett springs each take 5oz of pressure plus the weight of the trackers pretty soon, with couplers we're talking more than a pound of touch weight per key. As far as noise goes yes, I've heard the clicks of the Barkers in those and other recordings. I have also heard the clicks produced by tracker actions alone.

                One thing you can get with pneumatic couplers in a unison off option which can be quite handy in conjunction with 16' and 4' couplers.

                Proportionally the size should be reduced because of the smaller size of the instrument.

                Thanks for your input it helped me think through several points.

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                  #9
                  Well, you know how it functions, you know how to calculate the forces involved, thus you can calculate the sizes needed: pressure x surface = force. That's the issue with amateur organ building, it is very hard because most of it is experience.

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                    #10
                    Dr. Bill,

                    Does this help? This is the Puget organ at Notre Dame de Dalbade in Toulouse. AMAZING organ.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by FrenchHorn8 View Post
                      Dr. Bill,

                      Does this help? This is the Puget organ at Notre Dame de Dalbade in Toulouse. AMAZING organ.

                      This should prove most helpful. Great picture, would appreciate seeing any others of this instrument you may have.
                      Thanks,
                      Bill

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