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Mysterious Organ - help?

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  • Mysterious Organ - help?

    Hi there,
    I've recently bought and moved an Organ from a former Baptist Church in Garston, Liverpool. I believe that it used to be called 'Dovedale' baptist church, and was founded in the very late 19th century. I have been told that the organ was installed at the time that the church was built, but that the organ's casework was re-modelled in 1957. I cannot find any information ANYWHERE about this organ, and I'm having trouble identifying any of its history or even the maker. It's not known to the NPOR yet. I'm quite certain that it's English. If someone more knowledgeable than me could offer me a few clues, I'd be most grateful. 29 note pedalboard. I can take pictures of whatever is required. Thanks so much, everyone.

    The spec is -

    Stopped Diapason Treble / Bass
    Horn Gamba
    Principal
    Suabe flute
    Pedal Bourdon




  • #2
    Wow, 29 pedals but only one manual.

    David

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    • #3
      That's not that unusual. But what is that contraption with the foot pedal? Pedal to manual couple? Swell?

      I wouldn't mind pictures of the rest of the case and pipes. Just to get a feeling of what this looks like.

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      • #4
        That looks like a mechanical coupler that couples the manual to the pedal.

        Comment


        • #5
          things to look for: any scribed markings on the low C pipe - or first spotted metal pipe if the bass pipes are of zinc. numbers, names, scaling info.
          names or dates written in pencil anywhere in the case, the console area, the tails of the keys (behind where the key coverings stop). the tracker material (assuming that this is a mechanical-action organ.). The one metal pedal on the right above the pedal keys with the long wood lever - is that a hitch-down swell pedal? any markings on any of the pipes...hand-written on wood pipes, scribed in any metal pipes. inside the reservoir, any scraps of old newspaper that might have identifiable dates/places. Also..IF the church has the old records (of what would be the equivalent of the vestry), perhaps info may be found there. Also, the insides-of-the-covers to the wind chest pallet box...any numbers printed/written/stamped anywhere on the organ (console area/chests/keyboards/reservoir/feeders (if still hand-pump-able)/wind trunks/support structure/any surface inside or out of the swell box (if there is one).
          Rick in VA

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          • #6
            I think that may be the swell shutter control. My college chapel organ has something similar. Instead of being balanced, the shutters basically have only an open and shut position, sometimes with a half-way notch so that they can be half-open. I've been told that this is something common on late 19th-century English organs.

            I see seven knobs all together. What do they say individually?
            Martin Hartley
            Choral Scholar at St Patrick's Cathedral, Parramatta, Australia
            Student at Campion College, Australia
            Assistant Organist at St Margaret Mary's Catholic Church, Merrylands, Australia

            The Novice Organist: http://noviceorganist.blogspot.com.au

            Comment


            • #7
              That's definitely the swell pedal. Hitch down, and it has a couple of notches to hold it in different positions. Very typical of it's period, and still a common sight on village organs in England. The specification is shown in the first post. The seven drawstops will be made up of stopped diapason bass (common bass as the other 8's will probably be tenor C), stopped diapason treble, gamba, principal, suabe flute, and pedal bourdon and manual/pedal coupler.

              Nigel

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              • #8
                Nigel - I wanted to get an idea also of which were 8', 4', 2', etc. Although now you've outlined it, it makes sense. One thing which doesn't make sense to me though, is why there is a stop for a coupler. Wouldn't a small instrument such as this have the pedals permanently coupled?
                Martin Hartley
                Choral Scholar at St Patrick's Cathedral, Parramatta, Australia
                Student at Campion College, Australia
                Assistant Organist at St Margaret Mary's Catholic Church, Merrylands, Australia

                The Novice Organist: http://noviceorganist.blogspot.com.au

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sorry I didn't make it clear. The Stopped diapason bass will be 8' - just the bottom octave. The stopped diapason treble will also be 8' - from tenor C upwards. The Horn Gamba will also be 8' - again from tenor C upwards. The principal and suabe flute will be 4' and should extend for the full compass. The bourdon will, of course, be 16' but might not extend for the full compass. Many small organ like this do have the manuals permanently coupled, but it is useful if, as in this case, they are not. If you play the pedals without the coupler and just the Bourdon drawn, you will see if the stop is full compass.

                  Hope this helps,

                  Nigel

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