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    #16
    A little off-track, but I'd like to mention that after studying a little introductory organ registration, I'm somewhat annoyed to discover that the Italian Organ at my church doesn't have any string stops. There are Foundations, Flutes , Mixtures and one rather loud reed, but no string stops...

    Pedalling is a little easier now that I'm making a proper effort. (still need to get proper shoes for the job though). I've started out with a couple of hymns that I know so well that I don't have to think about the fingering and I can concentrate on the pedal technique. The whole heel-toe thing has started to make more sense after watching a couple of video clips. I'm getting pointers from a cathedral organist, so hopefully things will progress well without creating any bad habits.
    Martin Hartley
    Choral Scholar at St Patrick's Cathedral, Parramatta, Australia
    Student at Campion College, Australia
    Assistant Organist at St Margaret Mary's Catholic Church, Merrylands, Australia

    The Novice Organist: http://noviceorganist.blogspot.com.au

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      #17
      My residence organ is stringless and works just fine that way. However, my Principal 8 is gentle and if placed in a large church, would probably sound more like a Gemshorn. I realize that American church and concert organs are expected to have at least one string stop along with its celeste. I like them and find them useful; I just do not miss them in my residence organ.

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        #18
        Originally posted by hartleymartin View Post
        A little off-track, but I'd like to mention that after studying a little introductory organ registration, I'm somewhat annoyed to discover that the Italian Organ at my church doesn't have any string stops. There are Foundations, Flutes , Mixtures and one rather loud reed, but no string stops...
        Hartley,

        Depending on the genre of the instrument, that's not uncommon. Italian Baroque organs had a fair compliment of fiery reeds, and they were used generously. I have a couple books of Italian Baroque music, and almost all of it requires reeds in both manuals, sometimes solo reeds in both manuals against each other, or as a solo. Not sure exactly why, but Italian organs didn't have many strings on them until the 1800s or 1900s.

        I wish Soubasse32 were still an active member of this Forum. He could answer this question in a moment! He was a tremendous resource when it came to this subject matter--especially French music.

        Michael
        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
        • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

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          #19
          The organ I'm referring to was made around 1984 by Pinchi. It appears obvious now that the registration of the organ was heavily influenced by the Italian Baroque style, which is probably why the resident organist loves it for playing Bach's work. I'm still much more a fan of late 19th-century English organs, but I would admit that I would want a balanced swell pedal rather than a hitch down all-or-nothing pedal that most seem to have. I absolutely adore the Norman & Beard at Parramatta Cathedral.
          Martin Hartley
          Choral Scholar at St Patrick's Cathedral, Parramatta, Australia
          Student at Campion College, Australia
          Assistant Organist at St Margaret Mary's Catholic Church, Merrylands, Australia

          The Novice Organist: http://noviceorganist.blogspot.com.au

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            #20
            this is why I think ALL organists need to practice at least on ONE Hammond with a flat 2 octave pedalboard...if gives you some practice so that your feet will learn "something different" when pedaling. this is in ADDITION to practicing on a 32 note AGO pedalboard.

            Having the flat Hammond made it very possible for me to easily acclimate to almost any pedalboard I come across because I'm used to going between the 32 note AGO and the 25 note Hammond flat.

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