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Does tuning a organ make it louder?

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  • Does tuning a organ make it louder?

    I got my pipe organ tuned today.

    The diapasons & reeds to my ears are much louder...or am I crazy? This is only the 3rd time its been tuned but I don't remember it getting louder the other times. Nothing was done on the air pressure.

    Is there a reason for this?

  • #2
    Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

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    • #3
      Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

      is that the international sign for swimming pool ahead?

      (laughing-ducking)

      well it makes sense... the organ is uncomfortably loud. won't be long to return to normal I'm sure though (spring is coming)

      :)

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      • #4
        Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

        Hmm, Im not sure if it got louder or not. If everything was a bit flat, the slightly raised pitch may make it sound louder. But, alot of times, things are more shrill when they are out of tune (out of tune mixture...*shudders*)

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        • #5
          Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

          Not sure about the diapasons, but for a reed it is possible. There is a tuning between the reed and the resonator. This has a bit of influence on the loudness. But tuning doesn't make much difference on the phase.

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          • #6
            Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

            .

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            • #7
              Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

              I would estimate the increase in sound/volume is about 15%

              Just the diapason 8' rank by itself is noticibly louder even by itself...(I have the console next to the organ and the volume level before the tuning was pretty loud so that the stop was just about too loud to play for a extended period of time... now it is definately too loud to play up close).

              Same on the reeds, they are very loud now as well. They were VERY out of tune before, more so than the diapasons, but then I'm not overly intune sensative. (i.e. some beating doesn't bother me like it does others I guess).

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              • #8
                Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                Well, there are several things involved.

                Pipes of the same frequency have a tendency to "pull" each other to the same frequency and phase. So it can be that there is now more influence on each other because they are better in tune. But I doubt this would make a large impact in volume. Depending on the way the windchest is build, this can also contribute to the interaction between the diapasons and the reeds.

                With the reeds you have the play between reed and resonator. The resonator of a reed is a very important part in building the volume. So if they were badly out of tune, then yes it can make a difference.

                Then there is the matter of what and how they tuned them. If they did a bit more than tuning and regulated the pipes as well (so they all sound equal in tone and volume) then they may have altered the windsupply to the diapasons. Same for the reeds, just opening and dusting them can make a difference.

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                • #9
                  Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                  My home and church organ usually do sound louder after tuning. I think it is a matter of clarity and unison tone. Like a choir singing perfect unison verses half of them out. It seems to add to the power.

                  It is also possible that the whole pitch of the organ was changed. If the pitch was raised on the whole organ all open flues would get louder, some stopped flues would get louder, and reeds can be made louder but going up on the wire and down on the scroll.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                    Maybe it was just the fact that you had used a "Q-Tip" this morning and knowing the organ was tuned made it sound louder!

                    LOL (sorry had to go there)

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                    • #11
                      Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                      lol

                      no, it was actually slightly quieter this morning. now that I think about it I think it did get louder after the previous tunings, but the extreme loudness only lasts for a short while.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                        I definatley like the above and below ground pool diagrams

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                        • #13
                          Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                          Constructive interference is good stuff. When I'm up in the loft playing with my Bourdons and I play two lower ones at the same time that are a half-step apart, I can hear the spaces where there is no sound and spaces where the waves line up. So yes, tuning an organ does make it a lot louder, because if you have phases out of alignment, a lot of your sound waves will be cancelled and therefore wasted!

                          It's also possible your organ tuner raised the wind pressure. The last guy at my church did that however many years ago.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                            .

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                            • #15
                              Re: Does tuning a organ make it louder?

                              Actually, the diagram shows exactly what it needs to show, acc. Let's say you had two pipes tuned to one hertz (this is hypothetical, nobody has 512' pipes), which translates to once sine wave cycle per second (pictured above). If one of those two pipes is out of tune by 3 cents, then the sound waves will be out of phase at times, resulting in 3 "beats" per second where the waves cancel each other completely or reinforce each other. Now multiply this across an entire organ at different frequencies and pitches, and you have a lot of destructive interference going on, and therefore a lot of loss in power.

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