Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe



    Hi, I'm new here. I'm an American living in the Netherlands. Looking through a Johannus brochure (in Dutch) I see a typical pedal board as being concave (or not) but going from C to F, 30 notes. At their US site I see 32 notes, concave and radiating. (I'll assume that is the US\AGO standard?)




    Is the radiating pedal board a relatively recent development in the pedal board history?




    I'm just curious. I'm thinking about buying a digital pipe organ for the house and the pedal boards I see over here seem to mostly 30 notes and parallel (not radiating) and perhaps or not, concave. I'm still in the thinking stage. We'll be moving locally in the next few months and I want to have this move behind me before I even consider buying a beast for the living room.




    Thanks for indulging a new guy to your forum, google brought me here.




    Dave Horne, The Netherlands


  • #2
    Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe

    I now see that I should have posted this in the 'electronic' section just under this one. If the sysop would move it ... or not, that would be great. Sorry, DH

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe

      my 2 cents:

      really it is your preference. I myself don't know of any music that requires those top 2 notes..but I'm sure someone will correct me on that by posting that. ;)


      If you are going to be an organist in a church in the USA a AGO 32 note radiating pedalboard would probably be better as you'd be able to pedal between your new home organ and the church organ with ease.


      If you will mostly just be playing the organ at home then get what suits you best.

      I myself find it easier to play a eurostyle 30 note FLAT pedalboard versus the radiating AGO because I have such big feet (size 14)...., but I get along just fine with the AGO.

      As to a history of the "AGO" pedalboard, the concave radiating pedalboard originated in England by the Willis firm. It was quickly copied by Skinner and the top tier organ firms in the USA and codified by the "AGO" standard in the early part of the previous century. (AGO stands for American Guild of Organist)

      Oh... another factor: The resale value of the organ may be affected if it does not have the 32 note AGO pedalboard if you were to resell if in the USA at some point, but who knows, maybe someone would actually prefer a Euro style pedalboard... I know I myself would strongly consider a flat pedalboard just to have a practice instrument with that.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe



        Thanks for taking the time to reply. If I had to choose I'd probably go with the radiating and concave pedal board but only because that's what I used in college.Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe



          This is a follow up. I sent Johannus an e-mail yesterday and rec'd a reply from them today. Here's what I rec'd .....



          Dear Mr. Horne,


          First I like to thank you for the interest in the products of Johannus.


          The brochures you got at Verhoog´s muziek show the BDO(German Glide of Organ builders)models. They are all equipped with a flat or concave pedal board.


          These organs are designed for the European market, this in both style and sound.


          The organs that are on the US website are build according to the AGO (American Guild of Organists)standards. They come standard with an AGO pedal board.


          For the ones that like to have an AGO style pedal board we have the RACO pedal board, this is a radiated concave pedal, like the AGO. It fits right under the BDO standard organs.


          Unlike the AGO this is a 30 note in stead of 32 note.


          If you like to receive more info on the possibilities please feel free to contact me at Johannus. What you can also do is visit us at the factory in Ede. When you give me a phone call in advance I have the time to advise you properly and give you a factory tour.


          Best Regards,



          Vincent van Os.



          Sales Manager.


          Comment


          • #6
            Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe



            I happen to like the flat pedalboard -some reasons:




            1. Much of the world's greatest organ music was written for a flat pedalboard (including Bach, French / German Romantic works, etc.).




            2. One of the nice things about a flat pedalboard is that every note is equidistant from its neighbors - it takes some of the guesswork out of finding the notes (in theory, at least).




            3. I occasionally play duets - with an AGO pedalboard, one has the feeling of playing in the bottom of a barrel - feet get tangled up more often!




            If you are worried about adjusting, my thought is that organs withAGO pedalboards are very easy to find, if you feel the need to re-familiarize yourself. At least you will have the ability to play on BOTH styles - what a luxury!




            Regarding the pedal compass, again, many great organ works were conceived for pedalboards of 30 notes or less.It is not unusual to findshort compass pedalboards on very old American organs.




            The Sowerby Symphony uses the top "G". There are others, but it is not too big of an issue.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe



              "Much of the world's greatest organ music was written for a flat pedalboard (including Bach, French / German Romantic works, etc.)."




              Seems a strange thing to say. Composers then were writing for the organ as they found them. Since the radiating and/or concave hadn't come along they had no need to specify their music as being "for" a flat pedalboard. Some at least might have welcomed a concave and/or radiating board had it been available. We'll never know. But after all, it certainly wasn't invented and widely adopted (outside of Europe) because everyone agreed that flat was better. And certainly not for certain types of music.




              Rob

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe

                interesting that they don't offer a 32 note in europe.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe



                  OK, so much organ music wasn't written for a flat pedalboard. (not quite the point I wanted to make)...




                  But as you said, theradiating and/or concavepedalboard hadn't come along yet (in most cases).




                  My point was thatsincetons of great organmusic was written during the time when flat pedalboards were the standard, it should be perfectly fine to have one today. [:)]




                  Unless this fellow just likesanAGO pedalboard more!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: pedal board ... history? differences between AGO\US and Europe

                    The AGO I use isn't very AGO anymore thanks to the worn felt (naturals go down too far), but I find it easy enough to use compared to the horrid flat, radiating pedalboards on the Hammond and other organs. My feet can probably hit three naturals at once on those type, and they are utterly impossible for me to use. In the ideal world, I think one would use a slightly larger AGO-type pedalboard. I've never used a square, straight one though.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X