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1836 E. & G.G. Hook (Opus 26) - Not just another tracker

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  • 1836 E. & G.G. Hook (Opus 26) - Not just another tracker

    I thought it would be interesting to start a thread about the organ I play at Church each Sunday. I have been doing some reading on the forum, and I wanted to share some of this instruments rare and interesting features. I don't know how many other organs share the particular features that make this organ different from most, but I would be interested to hear about them.

    For those of you who did not see my introductory post to this forum, here is an overall shot of the organ in question (swiped from the OHS database).



    Here are the specs. Please forgive me if I don't get the terminology absolutely correct. I am still new to the Organ (zero lessons, and only playing for about 7 1/2 months). The footage numbers are not noted on the stops, so I don't know them, but they are listed on the OHS database, so I have copied those in here.

    3 divisions - Pedal / Great / Swell
    14 ranks
    17 stops
    3 couplers
    Keyboard Compass 70 (G0 to F6, no G#0)
    Pedal Compass 27 (C1 to D3)

    Slider chests
    Mechanical key action, Mechanical stop action.
    Drawknobs in vertical rows on flat jambs
    No combination action
    Trigger/Hitch-down Swell pedal (right side of pedal board)
    Machine Stop pedal to withdraw Great Principal, Twelfth, and fifteenth divisions (left side of pedal board)
    Both manuals are divided at F#2/G2
    Pedal board is straight and flat

    Stops are listed in order they occur at the console, from top to bottom.

    Swell - Stop name (footage): Compass

    Stop Diapason Bass (8'): G0 - F#2 (same rank as Stop Diapason lw)
    Principal Bass (4'): G0 - F#2 (same rank as Principal lw)
    Hautboy (8'): G2 - F6
    Viol Da Gamba (8'): G2 - F6
    Stop Diapason Treble (8'): G2 - F6
    Principal Treble (4'): G2 - F6
    Open Diapason (8'): G2 - F6

    Great - Stop name: Stop compass

    Flute (4'): C1 - F6
    Cremona (8'): G0 - F6
    Fifteenth (2'): G0 - F6
    Twelfth (2 2/3'): G0 -F6
    Principal (4'): G0 - F6
    Stop Diapason Treble (8'): G2 - F6 (same rank as Stop Diapason Bass)
    Stop Diapason Bass (8'): G0 - F#2
    Dulciana (8'): G2 -F6
    Open Diapason (8'): G0 - F6

    Pedal - Stop name: Stop Compass

    Sub Bass (16'): C1 - D3

    Couplers

    Great to Swell
    Swell to Pedal
    Great to Pedal

    Here are some photos of the console (and one sneak peak behind the music stand). Sorry for the poor quality. If there is interest, I will get some better photographs of the console and pipe chamber, and perhaps some internal shots as well.









    Here are some interesting facts about the history of this instrument (taken from the OHS database)

    Relocated from its original home and installed here in 1892.

    1836
    The organ was built by E. & G.G. Hook of Boston for St. Mark's, Warren, RI. Slightly enlarged by Hook & Hastings, 1875, by the addition of the two Swell Bass stops and a 16' Sub Bass of 25 notes. There were originally no Pedal pipes, and the Swell bass notes were probably permanently connected to the Great keys.

    1892
    Replacing an 1858 one-manual Nutting organ in the rear gallery, the Hook was moved to Northfield by Harlan P. Seaver of Springfield, Mass., in December, 1892. The installation cost just $550, plus $175 for the enlargement of the building. An 8' Trumpet or Cremona of Tenor G compass was replaced with an 8' Melodia of Tenor C compass, and the Swell 8' Viol and 8' Hautboy are of late 19th century pipes.

    1976
    David Hoore of North Pomfret, Vt., partially renovated the organ, and the work included altering the bellows, stripping the dark finish from the mahogany case veneer, replacing the once-gilded case pipes, adding two notes to the Pedal stop, installing·a Swell to Pedal Coupler, and replacing the Melodia with a full compass Cremona.

    1992
    Watersmith Pipe Organs of Enfield, N.H., lowered the Pedal keys into a recess in the floor, making the organ much more comfortable to play.

    2013
    This organ was presented Historic PIpe Organ Award Number 412 on 06/28/2013 (one year ago today) and received the designation Organ of Historical Significance.

    I hope you enjoy learning about this instrument as much as I do. Perhaps if I can get some decent recording equipment, I can post a video of it so you can hear it too.

    Cheers,
    “There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.”
    “What I have achieved by industry and practice, anyone else with tolerable natural gift and ability can also achieve.”
    Johann Sebastian Bach

    (at Home) Conn 645 Theater Deluxe
    (at Church) 1836 E. & G.G. Hook Bros, Opus 26

  • #2
    Hello, Arthur;

    Thank you for posting that wonderful and concise article on "your" Hook. Are you familiar with Barbara Owen's two-LPs on the Hooks? I have enjoyed them for lots of years now and intend to transfer them to a CD.

    Carry on doing your good work!

    . . . Jan
    (former Sub-Dean, Southern Oregon AGO Chapter)

    Comment


    • #3
      One nice looking organ! Nice size for the era and looks like has been take good care of. Thanks for posting.

      Mike

      Comment


      • #4
        Major correction. . . .

        One major correction. I noticed today that I have been living a lie. . . The manuals are G compass with 58 keys, not 70. :embarrassed:

        The manuals are missing the low G# and running from G below low C to F above high C. Somehow, my brain added a phantom octave to this organ for the last 8 months. I don't understand how I could have missed this, but it is quite evident from the photo of the manuals which I took myself. . .

        Ooops. . .

        So the final count of (speaking) pipes, based on this 'new' reality is 743.
        “There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.”
        “What I have achieved by industry and practice, anyone else with tolerable natural gift and ability can also achieve.”
        Johann Sebastian Bach

        (at Home) Conn 645 Theater Deluxe
        (at Church) 1836 E. & G.G. Hook Bros, Opus 26

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ArthurCambronne View Post
          The manuals are missing the low G# and running from G below low C to F above high C.
          How interesting! I've yet to run into an organ that removed notes from either end of the keyboard. It must sound interesting to hear if the pedals are coupled to hear the missing note. Must've been a cost-saving measure.

          In reality, how many of actually use the extremes of the keyboard or pedal board? If so, how often?

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

          Comment


          • #6
            The manuals actually run down below the pedal notes, so you can't couple to the (missing) low-G# from the pedals. The organ was originally made without pedals (in the English style, or so I am told), and the extra low notes were there to provide bass. On occasion, when I can't seem to learn the pedal part in time for service, I have re-arranged some hymns to have three parts in the right hand (by moving the tenor line up an octave) while playing the bass line [solo] down an octave to get the 16' sub-bass sound. It is actually nice to have that flexibility, since I really like the full bass sound of the 16', but my pedal skills are about 15 years behind my hands! And it sounds pretty convincing, too!
            “There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.”
            “What I have achieved by industry and practice, anyone else with tolerable natural gift and ability can also achieve.”
            Johann Sebastian Bach

            (at Home) Conn 645 Theater Deluxe
            (at Church) 1836 E. & G.G. Hook Bros, Opus 26

            Comment

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