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When was the first pedal-board attached to organ?

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  • When was the first pedal-board attached to organ?

    Hello,

    I would like to ask if anyone knows the information about when and in which country was the first time pedal-board attached to organ? Which book mentioned this?

    The only information I got is from a CD called "first printed organ music"music by Arnolt Schlick 1512, his music requires using pedal-board and the leaflet quoted Schlick's statement "playing organ with pedal now has been a standard practice in Germany". The earliest survival organ music the Buxheimer Organ Book 1470 also requires using pedal-board.

    Thank you!

    Alex
    Last edited by wyzwinszh; 08-08-2016, 12:05 AM.

  • #2
    According to the book - Mediaeval Music:*An Historical Sketch by R.C. Hope, the first record of an organ pedalboard was in 1120 in Utrecht Germany on the Cathedral Organ
    Last edited by Momboc; 08-07-2016, 11:44 PM.

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    • #3
      Utrecht is somewhere in the Netherlands and their Cathedral's Dom organ is a Batz, dating to the early 1800's. It is said to be one of top organs used by the Hauptwerk crowd.
      Last edited by mrdc2000; 08-08-2016, 08:47 AM.

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      • #4
        Like many features of the organ I would bet that it evolved over time rather than being "invented" as a complete concept. Some organist, whose name is lost to the mists of time, requested that an organ builder install a pedal to sound a key by way of a pull-down to the lower manual keyboard for a sustained low note. Then he wanted another for things like the penultimate note of a perfect cadence, then another for a plagal cadence - and so on. You can see this sort of thing on old Spanish organs although they date from a much later time period than I am talking about - like a mushroom sticking up out of the floor. The Spanish were rather isolated and developed some unique things as a result. Much of organ history is lost to the passage of time. I for one would like to know who made the first reeds and how they did it. I can not imagine tongues made from hand beaten brass sheet being very stable.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Terpodion View Post
          Like many features of the organ I would bet that it evolved over time rather than being "invented" as a complete concept. Some organist, whose name is lost to the mists of time, requested that an organ builder install a pedal to sound a key by way of a pull-down to the lower manual keyboard for a sustained low note. Then he wanted another for things like the penultimate note of a perfect cadence, then another for a plagal cadence - and so on. You can see this sort of thing on old Spanish organs although they date from a much later time period than I am talking about - like a mushroom sticking up out of the floor. The Spanish were rather isolated and developed some unique things as a result. Much of organ history is lost to the passage of time. I for one would like to know who made the first reeds and how they did it. I can not imagine tongues made from hand beaten brass sheet being very stable.
          I have no idea when the first reed pipes were made and would like to know it as well. But keep in mind that a lot of things were made to a standard you will now be pressed to find a artisan able to make it to the same standard as they did 500 years ago. The more old stuff I see, the less I think we advanced in any meaningful way. And I'm not talking organs alone.

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          • #6
            The story I heard on pedal boards was that they developed because the finger strength required to mechanically open the pallets of the larger bass pipes when coupled with a full registration was too great. More easily handled by the feet. No pneumatic or electric action to assist in those times.
            -Admin

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            • #7
              Yes, it's a common legend that organs were hard to play in this time. In German, playing the organ was called "die Orgel schlagen" (plucking/beating the organ), but at the same time, when we look at some of the organ music documented in the 14th and 15th century, there must have been organs that allowed fast and easy playing.
              We'll probably never know =-O

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              • #8
                "find a artisan able to make it to the same standard as they did 500 years ago." Look at handwriting. Just 100 years ago penmanship was taught. Working on organs of that era one sees how the parts were labeled in cursive script. Few today can write that well. Back then it was common.

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