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  • Church Organ Project


  • #2
    Re: Church Organ Project



    Nice spec, I like that you have enclosed the organ for all divisions. What is happening to the unused ranks of pipes?




    Chris

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    • #3
      Re: Church Organ Project



      That is a tight fit and a clever design. Since it is a unit organ anyway (and I mean that in the most positive sense of the term), why not plan for a future floating 5-rank mixture division? Something like this: 2-2/3, 2, 1-1/3, 1, 2/3. The stop might read "Upper Harmonics V" and if you plan for it now and build the accommodation into the design, then some day it may happen; otherwise it will more likely never happen.




      Good luck and God speed . . .




      [;)]

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      • #4
        Re: Church Organ Project





        Thanks for your comments!



        I am going to sneak this response in during my lunch hour...



        The primary reason why there are no mixtures or mutations is that the organ didn't really have anything suitable from its former life. Everything was either more valuable in its original capacity or too tubby! Believe it or not, there is a little bit of space leftover for future use, and I hope that we can incorporate a mixture stop as a crown to the reed-dominated Swell chorus.



        Just a few details about the Diapasons...



        The Great Diapasons are as follows:



        8' First Open - 42 Scale, spotted metal, 1/4 mouth, slide tuners, skived upper lips
        8' Second Open/Octave - 46 Scale, Hoyt metal, 2/9 mouth, slide tuners, blunt upper lips




        The Swell Diapason is 45 Scale, Spotted Metal, 1/4 mouth, slotted


        Best,



        Nathan

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Church Organ Project



          Hi Nathan,




          Of course, I meant to suggest that the mixture be added as new (or recycled) independent pipework, all 305 of them. I am assuming that you and everyone else assumed that this is what I was suggesting(?).




          All the best!




          [Y]

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Church Organ Project



            Hello,





            My response was proof that it was indeed written during my lunch hour! I think it's a great suggestion, and certainly a preparation that we intend to provide for as far as space, switching, and console matters are concerned. I think the remaining question is whether or not to put it on a single channeled action or to go with more of a composite Mixture.



            There is a local Whitelegg Moller nearby that has a Cornet IV in the Swell where the 2 2/3', 2', and 1 3/5' can be drawn independently and the mixture knob draws these in addition to a 1' rank. This Mixture really tops off the Swell reeds and provides lots of color.



            I would like to think that this organ is at least loosely inspired by Richard Whitelegg, that's the sort of sound and versatility that we're trying to achieve.





            Best,





            Nathan




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            • #7
              Re: Church Organ Project



              Thanks for the kind words, Chris,



              We are going to be selling off the pipework that we aren't using, as well as some melodic percussions that came with the instrument; this will hopefully offset some of the cost of materials for the new chassis. I hope to have a detailed list of these in the future, but some of the more interesting items are a Kinura, Labial Oboe, two Harmonic Tubas (one 16'), a Vox, and a Steere Gross Flute with open wood basses!


              Best,



              Nathan


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              • #8
                Re: Church Organ Project



                As regards perceptions of "excessive unification", a creative musician such as yourself will have no trouble chosing extended ranks than do notoverlap inadjacent octaves, and will thus avoid the hollow spots that the purists object to. The amature substitutes will have problems, but they will porbably do a one registration fits all setup anyway. Nobody can build an idiot proof specification.[:P][:@]




                I think you are right in your future plans to have at least part of you mixture separate. My vote would be for a 2 2/3' that can be extended to 1 1/3' withoutill effect, and also added into a few ranks of independent mixture.




                Is the 2nd diapason brighter than the 1st in spite of its wider scale? If not, I personally would choose the brighter voice for the Gt. octave stop.




                Iam sorry to see that the Vox didn't make it into the mix, but then, I am a romantic and dote on late Victorian/Eduardian sound.




                Congratulations and best wishes on the challenge you have ahead. [st][li]




                Lee

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                • #9
                  Re: Church Organ Project



                  Hello Again, Nathan--




                  Regarding your future mixture in reference to your leftover pipework. We took five ranks of leftover pipes from our renovation and enlargement project at church,revoiced some and cut down and revoiced others and created a totally successful Grand Cornet V (full compass) mixture. It ended up costing us a grand total of $15,000 when estimates for the same stop new went as high as $50,000.




                  Perhaps you could have a successful chorus mixture made from your leftover pipes? Just a thought . . .

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                  • #10
                    Re: Church Organ Project



                    Thanks again for the kind words and comments.



                    In this situation, the 2nd Open/octave is indeed not as bright as the 1st Open, and it is that way for want of subtlety in building up the registrations, particularly in our acoustically sensitive building. Where the 2nd open/octave lacks in brilliance it makes up for in blend as a subservient voice to the 1st. Also, the 1st is a real fireball, and I think to have it unified on itself would be a bit oppressive in our particular space. I see the 1st as leading the hymns, but my suspicion is that at the end of the day the 2nd open will be the workhorse of the two. Right now I am trying to negotiate the acquisition of a 70 scale Hutchings Fifteenth that would add some sparkle (the Fifteenth we have is a bit too fat, albeit spotted) on the top.



                    The celestes appearing at 4' pitch are intended to provide an
                    intermediate step between say unison flutes and strings, and
                    super-coupled flutes and strings by allowing the flutes to accompany
                    super-coupled strings at unison pitch only. The flutes are fully unified and duplexed simply for variety, and the ability to play them off of each other across the manuals.



                    The overarching goal with the choice and regulation of the pipework has been to put the neighboring unison and chorus ranks within close proximity volumewise so that there is a subtle but logical progression possible throughout the dynamic range - being further aided by the two expression boxes. The second, but no-less important goal is to keep the organ restrained for our room, which is reverberant but small. In every case we have picked lighter voices of all of the families from what we had available, except for the "Big Moose" Estey Bourdon outside and the 1st Open which is a one-rank hymn leader!



                    The primary mission of this instrument is accompaniment, whether hymns, choir, or our very own resident brass section (no joke!) so we are looking to get as much flexibility out of it as possible without blowing our eardrums out! [:D]





                    - Nate



                    P.S. There were two voxes that came with the organ and I'm hanging on to one of them just in case!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Church Organ Project



                      Greetings,



                      Although we'd love to compose a mixture out of the leftovers, just about all of it is either way too fat already, a reed, or tapered!




                      Do you have any sound samples of your Grand Cornet in action?



                      Best,



                      Nathan


                      Comment


                      • #12

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Changes



                          Wow, Nathan! Looks like you've got your hands full. Can't imagine a better man for the job, nor a more deserving one!!




                          How the heck did you manage to get your hands on an 8' Harmonic Flute and a 16' Contra Salicional, anyway?! Lucky man.




                          Also, is a Bass Clarinet a 16' Krummhorn or a 16' Clarinet, essentially? As a bass clarinet player, believe it or not, I find the sound of a low krummhorn to better approximate the sound of a bass clarinet than a low clarinet, at least on the "Les Grandes Orgues Restaurees de Notre Dame" CD. It is interesting how Cavaille-Coll was able to manipulate the clarinet or krummhorn design to produce either rank, which has its own unique tone.




                          Looks like a winning spec to me, though!

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