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  • Keyboard Question of the Day

    I was perusing pipe organ videos today on *outube, and found the following video. So, for the curious out there, does anyone care to venture a guess what type of manual the upper manual of the organ has at 1:01:55? Also note that the last two accidental notes on the other manuals are level with the natural keys.

    I just figured I've give everyone the curiosity of the day here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VBQtzIM4c8

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

  • #2
    Mean tone tuning, where sharps and flats are tuned differently. It seems to be this organ: http://www.cbfisk.com/instruments/opus_85_about

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    • #3
      I wonder if the extra keys on the top keyboard are to enable the organ to be played in two different temperaments. I seem to remember something like that somewhere in my memory banks.

      The C. B. Fisk opus 85 at Memorial Church, Stanford University has this feature. Here is a description from the C. B. Fisk website:

      "The organ at Memorial Church, Stanford University, Opus 85, combines elements from the Renaissance and the Baroque. This dualism shaped the tonal design and extends to the tuning of this unique organ. By means of five additional pipes in every octave, a large lever can switch the Werk, Ruckpositive, Seitenwerk, and Pedal divisions from a Renaissance fifth-comma meantone to a well-tempered tuning like those J. S. Bach knew. The Brustpositive and the Brustpedalia are fixed in meantone and offer two sub-semitones, or split sharps, per octave, D sharp/E flat and G sharp/A flat."

      Other pipe organs in two temperaments are Pasi opus 14, Wegscheider organs at the Allstedt Schlo├čkapelle (Op. 1) and Dresden-Wilschdorf (Op. 21). (I found this on the Pasi website.

      Does anyone know what the instrument in the video is?

      Bill


      - - - Updated - - -

      Toodles, I also thought it might be the C. B. Fisk. Also, this video was posted to YouTube in October 2017, however, it has to me much older. Gere Hancock died 5 years earlier.

      Bill
      Bill

      My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

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      • #4
        Y'all are way too good for me! And I thought I was asking a stumper. I understand centuries ago, keyboards were actually constructed that way to allow them to play in more than one key (before equal temperament). What did puzzle me was the two sharps on the right end of the keyboard that are the same level as the naturals. I've played a piano with a sharp broken off, and found it difficult to play. It makes me wonder how they are actually played.

        Michael
        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
        • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

        Comment


        • #5
          The video is from 1996 and I found a catalog listing of the organists--then did a google search to see which organist resembled the one playing that organ--I had to guess at how he had aged! But his bio got me to the Fisk Stanford organ.

          Maybe the two short sharps mean those don't have the pipes for the mean tone tuning--most of the organ (except the top Brustwerk) seems to have dual temperaments by having extra pipes.

          I attended the University of Iowa in the early 1970's, and they installed a new Phelps Casavant of about 58 ranks, tracker. In the early 2000's the music auditorium building flooded. The organ was mostly unaffected because it was installed on a balcony overlooking a music hall, but was filthy and suffered a little from the humidity. It became part of the salvage, and the construction company donated it to a local church, who is cleaning, refurbishing and reinstalling it at a cost of around $1 million. Original cost was around $120K.

          The University is having a new Klais German Romantic instrument installed in the new music building (on higher ground).

          How times have changed!

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          • #6
            This looks familiar. I think I ran onto that organ some time ago when researching Fisk instruments, or maybe it was on a video documentary somewhere.

            I wonder if the pedal board is similarly equipped with the alternative chromatics? That would be quite a stretch to play!
            John
            ----------
            *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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            • #7
              Am I correct in thinking that in the split accidentals the "flat" is lower than the "sharp"?

              David

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              • #8
                Originally posted by toodles View Post
                ... I attended the University of Iowa in the early 1970's, and they installed a new Phelps Casavant of about 58 ranks, tracker. In the early 2000's the music auditorium building flooded. The organ was mostly unaffected because it was installed on a balcony overlooking a music hall, but was filthy and suffered a little from the humidity. It became part of the salvage, and the construction company donated it to a local church, who is cleaning, refurbishing and reinstalling it at a cost of around $1 million. Original cost was around $120K. The University is having a new Klais German Romantic instrument installed in the new music building (on higher ground). How times have changed!
                (drifting off-topic a bit) - The Casavant is now in use, though only about two-thirds complete (they hope to be finished sometime this summer); Dobson has done the cleaning/installation work. Here is a FAQ page about it at the church's website: https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.clove...fact_sheet.pdf I haven't heard it yet in its new home (St. Andrew's Presbyterian, Iowa City) but have heard good reports. The new Klais at UI is a good instrument; I have heard that one several times, and our Guild chapter was there for an organ crawl, in which we got to climb up into the chambers. Very nice workmanship inside, especially the wooden pipes. Here is a page about the instrument from the builder's website: https://www.orgelbau-klais.com/m.php?sid=306 I detest the modernistic facade (and yes, I'm told that those are speaking pipes). Rumor mill has it that the architect insisted on something modern, and this is what they ended up with. But I do like the instrument, and am glad to have something of this sort close enough to go hear it.

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                • #9
                  Thank you for the update on the Klais & the Casavant.

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                  • #10
                    I remember this documentary I got it for my birthday back in 2006 along with another organ documentary "Voices in the Wind".

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