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  • Martinis

    What, generally constitutes a Holtkamp martini[D] (besides Gin, vodka and vermouth in a cold glass sitting aside the manuals...)?

  • #2
    Re: Martinis

    Well. the icing on the cake is that it is SHAKEN, not stirred...

    <;-)

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Martinis

      Oh, sorry I forgot, see what I get for being under 21[:$][:P][D]

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Martinis



        The organist's name must be Olive! [:P]




        Infofrom the Internet (not confirmed):




        The Martini, so named because it's design was developed on a napkin over cocktails.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Martinis



          Just in case anyone is interested in a serious answer to the Martini question, the following came from the pipeorg-l list archives:




          Mr. Holtkamp had been asked to build an organ for the concert hall at
          Syracuse University (yeah, the famous one with drawknobs) as well as a
          small practice organ. Athur Poister was the present organist (or at
          least the one working with Holtkamp) and one night in the late 1940's,
          Holtkamp, Poister, Fenner Douglass and Grigg Fountain met at a rented
          apartment that Fenner and Fountain discussed had Martinis and put down
          every possible scheme for cross duplication and decided on the present
          organ, the spec of which is below. Because they were drinking Martinis,
          they named it the "Martini" organ. Many of them were built, some still remain in use.




          The first 4 Martinis had a 16' Gedeckt in the Pedal, but that was later permanently
          changed to a (metal)Quintadena as they felt it was quicker to speak and not as
          heavy and also took into consideration the small spaces these organs
          would occupy. Martinis were completely unenclosed, exposed and
          had no pistons or anything like that.

          Spec of the first Martini:

          Originally Job #1641, year 1949 for Oberlin College, in Oberlin, Ohio.

          Pedal

          16 Gedackt (later changed to Quintadena)
          8 Gedackt
          4 Principal
          4 Quintadena

          Lower Manual

          8 Gedackt
          4 Principal
          4 Quintadena
          II Cymbel

          Upper Manual

          8 Quintadena (1-12 Gedackt)
          4 Gedackt
          2 Principal
          1-1/3 Larigot (Gedackt)

          ANALYSIS:
          3" wind, 61/32 notes

          16'-8'-4'-1 1/3' Gedackt (wood), 97 pipes
          4'-2' Principal, 76 pipes
          4' Quintadena (later extended to 16'), originally 61 pipes, but 97 with
          16' and 73 for Gedackt
          II Cymbel, 122 pipes:

          Note: C1 C13 C25 C37 F#55
          Pitches: 2/3 1 1-1/3 2 2-2/3
          1/2 2/3 1 1-1/3 2
          The mixture was also revised to break at every octave when the 16' Quintadena replaced the 16' Gedackt.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Martinis

            Thanks, I was actually looking for that kind of serious answer.

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            • #7
              Re: Martinis



              [quote user="JPSmith"] Just in case anyone is interested in a serious answer to the Martini question ...[/quote]




              Gee, my answer was at least serious enough to give the origin of the term. [:^)]




              If youare cutting & pastingan entiremessagefrom another forum, you might include the name of the original poster or a link.

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              • #8
                Re: Martinis



                The Organ Clearing House is currently listing a Martini for sale...




                http://organclearinghouse.com/instr/...php?instr=2178



                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Martinis



                  Tiyr answe is pretty cloe to the actual sory, the specs are "right on" and your explanation is an excellent one. Actually, when ArthurPoister told Dr. Frank Shaw (Director ofthe Oberlin Con at that tinme) that he was leaving, Grigg went to Dr. Shaw and said that Oberlin had to do somehing quickly to fill the voidleft byArthur and prhaps the best was was to get a decent organ.



                  That started the ball rolling. The first Martini was for Oberlin (it ended in Fenner's studio) was a "test"to prove to Dr Shaw that Holtkamp was the way to go and it cost $10,000. The test was a good one and Dr. Shaw budgeted an addition $20,00o to rebuild the Warner Hall Roosevelt-Skinner. hopse who attended the "martini party" were as yu list, except that Arthur was not there, just Walter Holtkamp, Fenmer and Grigg. This information came to me from Grigg Fountain.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Martinis

                    apologies for the typos - old stubby fingers

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                    • #11
                      Re: Martinis



                      Thanks for the information, Bill. No worry about the typos; at least they were not caused by too many martinis!




                      [;)]

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                      • #12
                        Re: Martinis

                        Interestingly enough, I removed a "Martini" from the Manhattan School of Music in late 2007 that carried the date <1945> on it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Martinis



                          Arthur Poister was NOT involved in the design of the Holtkamp Martini organ. It was Walter, Grigg Fountain and Fenner Douglass. The discussion and design took place at the old Oberlin Inn dining room over dinner and then the three convened to Fenner and Grigg;s apartment to have martinis. It was there that instrument was named.




                          It was builtas a testfor Frank Shaw, then the Dean of the Oberlin Conservatory before Walterwas contracted to rebuild the Skinner in Warner Hall. It was built for less than $10,000. I played it many many many times at Oberlin as an undergrad and grad student. It now resides at the current conservatory as part of the Kulas practice organ collection.

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