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  • Anonymous Benefactor...

    approaches your ecclesiastical authorities. This party is offering to underwrite the expense of an all new instrument. Your officials turn to you for some help. They want to know how much will the new cost. You are the organ expert. What you say will have some influence. Will you base your answer on a new all-purpose domestic pipe organ? or will you instead suggest a domestic or even foreign period focused organ; a tracker according to North German or French Symphonic or English Cathedral? What say YOU?

  • #2
    Re: Anonymous Benefactor...

    ...

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    • #3
      Re: Anonymous Benefactor...

      My thoughts exactly...

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      • #4
        Re: Anonymous Benefactor...



        Definitely not enough information. Relevant data are the size of the space, the type of music to be played, the acoustical characteristics, the service model, not to mention the personal taste of the head cleric.




        David

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        • #5
          Re: Anonymous Benefactor...



          Form Follows Function.




          The first question to ask is "What function will the instrument perform in the church?" The answer may be that it will have more than one distinct usage. It may be the primary instrument for the leading of congregational singing, and it may also be a teaching instrument, and/'or a recital instrument. Depending on the church's accepted style or worship, it may be the sole musical instrument, or it may be part of an ensemble. -- Worst case, organist's nightmare -- playing backup to a rock/praise band. [:@] If it is the primary instrument, what type of music will be played? Hymns, classical pieces, modern stuff, etc.?




          This answer should include a thorough examinatin of the church's musical style and taste, and where that will be moving in the future. Dig even deeper and zero in on the specific tonal style (if we're talking pipe organ) that will best serve the situation -- American Classic, French, English, German, Baroque, Romantic, etc., and what kind of action is likely to best fit the tonal style.




          Other questions to ask: "How much space is available -- for the console, for pipes, chests, blowers, speakers (if applicable)?" No point in suggesting 50 ranks if there's only room for a Hammond spinet.




          Don't forget to ask: "How much money are we talking about?" -- Anonymouse Benefactor may have seen an ad in the local paper advertising brand new church/chapel models for $6995 and may have THAT in mind -- or A.B. may be richer than Sam Walton and wanting to unload a couple million dollars for a sweet tax benefit.




          But, oh, the possibilities ................




          John


          John
          ----------
          *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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          • #6
            Re: Anonymous Benefactor...



            My philosophy is to always go for a full-blown (pun intended) American Classic concert organ that will automatically satisfy all of the lesser functions as well. If the budget is not $2-3 million, then you start working backward from there. Why not?




            [<:o)]




            Ave pecunia, emituri te salutamus!

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            • #7
              Re: Anonymous Benefactor...

              If it's for typical church function, ie, hymns, I say just have a local organ firm install a used organ from another church. Regardless of size, it'll cut the cost of the organ at least in half. You will, however, need to upsize the organ as required depending on how large the space is. My church's sanctuary probably holds 500-600 or so and the 20-rank organ we have is just right, that is, at ff it still has plenty of gusto to be heard over the congregation. A new organ of the same spec would be about $1-2M, I believe Nathan mentioned when he came down.

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              • #8
                Re: Anonymous Benefactor...



                I think that a new 20-rank organwould cost between $500,000 and $750,000; more if from a very high-end boutique builder. For $1-2 million, you should be able to obtain a new, quality, 50-rank instrument; more like 75 ranks toward the $2 million end of the spectrum.




                I hope . . . [*-)]

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                • #9
                  Re: Anonymous Benefactor...



                  Our new Klais instrument is67 ranks and cost $1.3 million, or about $20,000 per rank. Admittedly, we got a real bargain (and a wonderful instrument!)--$25,000/rank is a much more common rate, with Fisk and others charging at least $35,000/rank or more. One of the factors resulting in our low price was that the price was locked in several years ago when the Euro was only $1.18--it would be a lot more now.




                  David

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