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Is it possible to make a mixture with Reeds?

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  • davidecasteel
    commented on 's reply
    I don't think a "Mixture" is possible without at least one non-octave (mutation) rank. Mixtures are intended to bolster the upper range of tome and they typically "break back" when a rank goes too high to serve that purpose. The ranks in a Mixture don't all break back at the same point, either. (I'm not an expert in this matter, but that is what I've always found in the literature.)

    AFAIK, the only "Misture" that normally does not break back is a Sesquiatera.

  • St Josaphat
    replied
    Originally posted by myorgan View Post
    Thank you for telling us about it. How does it sound? Is it muddy, usable or unusable, etc.?

    Michael
    It is very soft, and not muddy, so it's fairly usable. I personally would have left it out of the specifications, but I suppose if you are improvising it could be useful if you have a trio with Cantus Firmus in the Bass. That organ has also recently acquired a rank of French Horn pipes, so that will be exciting to hear.

    Leave a comment:


  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by St Josaphat View Post
    It is a Reed Cornet. From a soft Hautbois, extension from the Swell.
    Thank you for telling us about it. How does it sound? Is it muddy, usable or unusable, etc.?

    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • St Josaphat
    replied
    Originally posted by myorgan View Post
    So, is your point to support Regeron's first paragraph, or are you saying it's a Reed Cornet?

    Michael
    It is a Reed Cornet. From a soft Hautbois, extension from the Swell.

    Leave a comment:


  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Originally posted by St Josaphat
    The Church of Saint Vincent Ferrer (NYC) has a Grand Cornet V 32' in the Chancel Pedal.
    So, is your point to support Regeron's first paragraph, or are you saying it's a Reed Cornet?

    Michael

  • St Josaphat
    commented on 's reply
    The Church of Saint Vincent Ferrer (NYC) has a Grand Cornet V 32' in the Chancel Pedal.

  • Jay999
    commented on 's reply
    Probably a bear to keep in tune! Flues go sharp and flat with the slightest temperature changes...but reeds pretty well stay on the pitch they were tuned to.

  • Hohl Flute
    replied
    My information on the Grand Cornet at Downside comes from an article in "The Organ" published shortly after it was installed. It was labelled as XV ranks, not XII, and was described as a "miniature full organ". When I last played it I worked out that the reeds were derived from the two Posaune ranks - at different pitches from those employed on the Great.

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  • regeron
    commented on 's reply
    A Cornet is traditionally made of flue pipes. The most common type of Cornet (Cornet V) is made of 5 ranks of flutes: 8', 4', 2 2/3', 2 and 1 3/5'. The Grand Cornet might be a Cornet based an octave lower: 16', 8', 5 1/3', 4' and 3 1/5' - but it would still be based on flue pipes, not reeds.
    People are often confused because of the brass instrument from the Trumpet family - the Cornet. They assume that because the Trumpet translates to the organ as a reed stop, the Cornet does the same.
    This also creates pronunciation issues:
    - the organ stop is pronounced "cor-NAY"
    - the brass instrument is pronounced "COR-net"
    Last edited by regeron; 09-23-2019, 07:43 AM.

  • samibe
    commented on 's reply
    Could it be the grand cornet? or is that something else?
    Last edited by samibe; 09-23-2019, 07:56 AM.

  • regeron
    commented on 's reply
    I found the stoplist for the Compton Organ at Downside Abbey: https://sites.google.com/site/theorg...ompton-organ-1
    I don't understand what you mean by "such a stop on the Bombarde section." I see reeds at 16', 8' and 4'. I see no indication that they have been incorporated into a large mixture stop.

  • SubBase
    replied
    The Midmer-Losh has Trumpet mutation ranks, probably on 50" wind.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hohl Flute
    replied
    Occasionally builders have incorporated reed ranks into large mixture stops, though these would be of 16', 8' or 4' pitch in addition to the principal scaled unisons and quints (and occasionally tierces). The effect is that of a miniature "full organ". The big 4 manual Compton in Downside Abbey has such a stop on the Bombarde section.

    Leave a comment:


  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Don't bother. Mixing Mixtures is generally a very bad idea. Often you end up with major or minor 2nds that never resolve. One needs to know how each Mixture is derived to mix them successfully.

    Michael

  • Ben Madison
    commented on 's reply
    i was working on a theatre organ spec for fun and i decided to add both a Cymbale and Cornet and i thought i work out something novel to have in case i wanted to go out and actually build it
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