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Organ at the Versailles Chapelle Royale

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  • gtc
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, and rising damp is a major issue in older buildings. There's an entire industry devoted to installing damp proof courses.

  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Followed closely by foundation, foundation, foundation. The upper structure of a building is hard-pressed to survive if it has an inadequate foundation. This is especially true with tracker organs, as their tolerances are so small.

    Michael

  • gtc
    replied
    Fascinating. Some takeaways ...

    Played by Mozart.

    'A' was originally 392 Hz, now 415.

    The strongest opponents of the upward tendency in pitch were singers, who complained that it was putting a strain on their voices. Largely due to their protests, the French government passed a law on February 16, 1859, which set the A above middle C at 435 Hz. This was the first attempt to standardize pitch on such a scale, and was known as the diapason normal. -- Wiki.
    Ensure its posterity "with authenticity, albeit false" 😁

    Those pedals are for pixie feet.

    As regards priority area of restoration work in any historic building, I would say the top 3 are always: roof, roof and roof. Water ingress from leaking roofs will eventually destroy everything below them, floor by floor. Stately houses and buildings around the world are rotting away for the want of expensive roof repairs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Philip Powell
    commented on 's reply
    It truly is a mystery how it can sound so good and yet be so simple (well, most of the time)!

  • Larason2
    commented on 's reply
    That's funny! When I first discovered French Baroque organ music, I was just like the chap in the cartoon too! Listening to Contrebombarde with my headphones and a smile on my face!

  • Philip Powell
    commented on 's reply
    Hey! I've known about it for like a whole two years! 😁

  • SchnarrHorn
    replied
    Philip,
    You are quite welcome. Also, you may want to look at the other post I made about an intro to organ music of the French Classic period here. The organ used for the demos is quite interesting - by Gene Bedient modeled after a Clicquot down to the stubby, pushbutton pedalboard.

    Also, if you'll please pardon an old man teasing a young fellow like you - your comment reminded me of the following New Yorker cartoon. 😊

    Click image for larger version

Name:	hes-just-discovered-french-baroque-organ-music-edward-kore.jpg?u=https%3A%2F%2Fimages.fineartamerica.com%2Fimages-medium-large-5%2Fhes-just-discovered-french-baroque-organ-music-edward-kore.jpg&q=0&b=1&p=0&a=0.png
Views:	150
Size:	118.8 KB
ID:	796252

    George

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  • Philip Powell
    replied
    Very interesting! I am a big fan of French baroque music and that of F. Couperin's in particular. Thanks, George!

    Philip

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  • SchnarrHorn
    started a topic Organ at the Versailles Chapelle Royale

    Organ at the Versailles Chapelle Royale

    I came across the Versailles YouTube channel. It contains many interesting videos. Below is a series of three videos about the organ in the Chapelle Royale and its organists. The fourth video is a performance of Daquin's Noel X on the organ. The last video is a synopsis of the restoration of the building. Subtitles in English. None of the videos are long. The organ console sure looks luxurious - gold everywhere. And it's great to see the care and attention that was given to the restoration of not only the organ but the building itself. Truly cultural treasures.

    George









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