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  • Pipe organs on the Baltic



    I have posted some photos I took of pipe organs I saw (and heard) on my recent cruise of the North and Baltic Seas.




    Here is the link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8712554...7607310458446/




    David


  • #2
    Re: Pipe organs on the Baltic

    Thank you, David!

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    • #3
      Re: Pipe organs on the Baltic

      Thanks David. I'm glad to have a close-up photo of the organ stops in the Church of the Rock.I didn't have time to make a photo when I played there. It brings back memories...

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      • #4
        Re: Pipe organs on the Baltic



        Aloha SB32,



        Aha, you played at the Church which is blasted into the rock - It does give new meaning to the hymn *Built On A Rock The Church Doth Stand*.  The work of the architects Timo & Tuomo Suomalainen who designed that Church building understood how effective the rockface would be as part of the interior design.  I remember being fascinated to see how water slowly oozed forth from varying nooks and crannies in the rockface inside the Church.



        Cheerio,



        Kphone 

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        • #5
          Re: Pipe organs on the Baltic



          Until very recently, it never occurred to me thatorgans even existed north of Germany; and if they did, they must beunappealling contraptions thatmerited little interest; An attitude applied not only to their organs, but their musical aptitude in general.




          With internet, Youtube and all that sort of stuff, hearingsome of thesenorthern organs for the first time, took me entirely bysurprise. Their organs are not only awesome; and can hold their own against anything built in Germany; but they actually have real organists waaay up there in ReindeerLand, who actuallyknowhow to play these things!! [:|]

          2008: Phoenix III/44

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          • #6
            Re: Pipe organs on the Baltic



            Clarion, prior to that cruise, I did at least know of Marcussen in Denmark--they were one of the firms the Organ Selection Committee of our church (of which I was a member) was considering. SB, unfortunately in most cases I did not have access to the consoles of the instruments and could not get photos of the stop controls. When I can I try to do so, so that I can (could) construct a Stop List. In the case of the Stockholm organ in St. Jacob's Cathedral I was able to actually get a book about the instrument--unfortunately, it's in Swedish! (I guess I could probably manage to interpret the Stop List, though.)




            I really wish I could have done more to see and hear the remarkable instruments up there, but as a non-organist my contacts are few and as a tourist on a cruise my travel options were equally sparse. One does what one can. I did take a couple of land tours that were advertised as cathedral crawls (well, not in those words) and so did get to see some very awesome instruments; in a couple of cases I even got to hear them, albeit for only a few minutes. With a lot of prior research I probably could have put together some trips using cabs and/or public transportation to just visit cathedrals and churches, maybe hear a concert or two (like the one I almost missed in Stockholm), but in reality that was not the primary purpose of my cruise--I was there to see more than just churches. All in all, with the limited time available to me at each port, I think I did fairly well.




            The beauty of digital photography is that (1) it's immediate--you see what you have taken right away and can do it again if it didn't work; and(2) it's cheap--a $20 chip will hold hundreds of high-quality photos, which can be downloaded and the chip erased to be used again many times. When I was using film, I found myself taking maybe 30-75 photos a day and would be faced with a $500-$800 development and printing bill when I got home; with digital photography I am somewhat less selective when taking photos (I average at least 100/day--twice that if there is much to photograph) and I can be selective when I get home because it doesn't cost much to throw pictures away. However, because of the immediacy factor, there are usually fewer really bad photos to discard, so I end up with more pictures to keep than I had with film. Although I've never been very good about organizing prints into scrapbooks (I think only 2 trips produced acceptable ones) I have found posting my digital photos to web sites such as Flickr and Webshots to be quite easy. Using the Internet to look up locations and identify what a photo is of is also a big help, especially if one does not make copious notes while clicking away (and who has time for that on a tour?). I'm trying out some GPS logger technology but I haven't gotten all the problems with using it solved yet. That will make it possible to identify exactly where each photo was taken, and from that it should be easier to figure out what it's a picture of.




            I know that my photos are not the quality that a professional photographer with lots of time and control of lighting, clutter, people, etc. can achieve, but I do try to get safisfactory shots. I don't use a tripod (too big to carry and no time to set it up, even if allowed) and I don't generally use a flash (in big spaces they don't help, anyway). With all the limitations imposed, I think I do fairly well and I'm satisfied with the results. I do use some post-processing of the images to fix tilt, exposure, and (rarely)composition. I don't consider that to be cheating because it's just part of the digital photography scene.




            Thanks, folks, for all the kind comments.




            David

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