Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to restore wooden draw knob rank engraving?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to restore wooden draw knob rank engraving?

    As per the sample image below, the engraved rank names on the wooden draw knobs on a frequently-used organ that I'm familiar with have dulled over the years to the point where it is now hard to read them. This photo was taken more than 10 years ago. The engraving is much harder to read today.

    I'm wondering how to bring them back to a better degree of readability without damaging the knobs.

    If this were the engraved metal panel on a piece of electronic equipment, then I'd be using model maker's enamel paint, however I'm not proposing to do that with this organ unless those in the know suggest that it is the way to go.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Draw knobs.jpg Views:	0 Size:	13.7 KB ID:	826456
    -------

    Hammond M-102 #21000.
    Leslie 147 #F7453.
    Hammond S-6 #72421

  • #2
    Check with a local engraving company (think awards, plaques, banners, etc.). My local guy charged next to nothing to make some new ones for me, and I'm sure any competent engraver would be able to figure out the process used on your organ.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      Definitely not wanting to remove/replace them, just brighten up the 'printing'.
      -------

      Hammond M-102 #21000.
      Leslie 147 #F7453.
      Hammond S-6 #72421

      Comment


      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        GTC,

        I'm not talking about replacing them. I was referring to having an engraver figure out how to refresh or repair the engraving/color on the knobs.

        Sorry to mislead you.

        Michael

    • #4
      It's hard to tell how they were engraved. Are they cut into the stop face? Also, what makes them hard to read, are the characters losing definition, or is the light colour becoming dark or the dark colour becoming light? All that affects what recommendations we could make.

      Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
      Former: Yamaha E3R
      https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by Larason2 View Post
        It's hard to tell how they were engraved. Are they cut into the stop face? Also, what makes them hard to read, are the characters losing definition, or is the light colour becoming dark or the dark colour becoming light? All that affects what recommendations we could make.
        They are engraved and paint filled. The engraving is very shallow -- maybe 1 mm or less. The knob faces have become grubby from use over 40 years and the painted (or inked?) engravings are now almost the color of the knobs and difficult to read. On other stops the paint/ink has almost disappeared.

        As I said at the top, if this were a metal panel I would use model maker's enamel paint as I have done a few times to restore engravings below controls and switches, However, it's wood and I don't want to make a mess of things. But maybe enamel is the answer.
        -------

        Hammond M-102 #21000.
        Leslie 147 #F7453.
        Hammond S-6 #72421

        Comment


        • #6
          I'd use a very fine file (like a needle file) to roughen the surface of the characters, then add fresh white paint with a fine brush. Could be enamel paint. The roughening is necessary so the paint doesn't just flake off. You'll also remove some of the grime!

          Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
          Former: Yamaha E3R
          https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by Larason2 View Post
            I'd use a very fine file (like a needle file) to roughen the surface of the characters, then add fresh white paint with a fine brush. Could be enamel paint. The roughening is necessary so the paint doesn't just flake off. You'll also remove some of the grime!
            I'll likely clean the knob surface with a baby's toothbrush and some isopropyl.

            Rather than a brush, I'm looking at this type of paint pen: https://www.posca.com/en/product/pc-1mr/

            I'd need some practice sessions on another wooden surface with punched-in lettering.
            -------

            Hammond M-102 #21000.
            Leslie 147 #F7453.
            Hammond S-6 #72421

            Comment


            • #8
              That might work, but I still think something is necessary to roughen the surface. Try it though, and see how it works!

              Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
              Former: Yamaha E3R
              https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

              Comment


              • myorgan
                myorgan commented
                Editing a comment
                Would 0000ga. steel wool work?

                Michael

              • gtc
                gtc commented
                Editing a comment
                Good thought. I've used 0000 on vintage radio cabinets between coats of lacquer.
            Working...
            X