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  • classical organs



    WhenI was working with a `tribute band`(Elvis) in Liverpool(UK)some time ago,I had the oportunity to visit the Anglican cathedral.




    Noel Rawsthorne was theorganist then,but I was introduced to Ian Tracy(now professor,and director of music)and had the good luck to explore the magnificent instrument.




    It was quite scary though as we clambered along the narrow walkwaysin the organ lofts high in the cathedral.




    This organ was,at the time,the most complete church organ andI think it had over 9000 pipes,ranging from extremely small to the almighty bourdons.




    It was an experience I will never forget.




    I have several recordings of the organ,but still my favourite is Noel Rawsthorne`s original one,in the `cathedral series.`


  • #2
    Re: classical organs



    The first pipe organ chambers I ever ventured into was back in the early '70s...a Gress Miles direct-electric action organ of about 40 ranks in a brown stone church in New Britain, CT. That was a thrill for this teenager, that's for sure (along with meeting visiting organist Simon Preston)!



    Over the years, I've been through many organ chambers, but nothing (yet) would compare to climbing the steps into the chambers of the Liverpool Cathedral organ...is this the largest Henry Willis instrument in the UK?



    I have 2 recordings with Mr. Rawsthorne and only 1 of Ian Tracy, both performing at the Great Organ of the Liverpool Cathedral...both spectacular organists in their own rights who can make that massive instrument sing!

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    • #3
      Re: classical organs



      I`m not sure if it is still the largest Henry Willis,but it certainly was an exciting experience.



      Whilst Ian Tracy is a very accomplished organist and musical director,I still have a preference for the Noel Rawsthorne recording.



      I have many other recordings in the cathedral organ series.

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      • #4
        Re: classical organs

        The first organ chamber I even went partly into was that of a used-to-be-a-Holtkamp (now a Hillgreen-Lane), back when I was 12 years old (which make that year 2001). The next thing I went inside was THE 1952 Holtkamp (I call it "THE" because its about the most important thing out of the shop that year), and after that it was a Schlicker rebuilt by Schantz, followed by a 1935 Skinner-Steere (I lean more towards Steere on my judgement of this one) of four manuals. After the Steere, I went inside the chambers of Skinner op. 328, the Cleveland Municipal organ, the specs of which may be found here. After the Cleveland Muni, I went partway into a Wilhelm tracker, after that one, I went part way into an organ which used to be an Austin, but was rebuilt by Southfield, but I didn't get far, because I couldn't find a light switch and couldn't really see much of anything, I do know it was an organ chamber (or at least organ related) because I saw two boxes which said Peterson on them. After that one, I went insied a Holtkamp tracker, and I feel kinda sorry for the guy who has tune it, because its very tight in there. Those are all the organs I've been inside.

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        • #5
          Re: classical organs

          The first organ I ventured into (but did not play) was a 3/12 Wurlitzer here in Rochester. I was ~7 (2000 or 2001) and I have since played it many times. We went up into the Main chamber, because the Solo was too loud to enter while someone was playing the organ. After that would be a 3m A-S in St. Matthew's Lutheran (LCMS) built in the 20s. It was in one of the worst neighborhoods downtown, but a beautiful church, and also the first pipe organ I ever played (2004). After that was a 2/14 Moller from the 20s. (2005) Then I went inside the new organ at Christ Episcopal Church, Rochester (my teacher's church). See it here:http://esm.rochester.edu/eroi/c-s.php. Also saw the bellows room of the Italian Baroque organ at the University of Rochester Memorial Art Gallery. Also on the ESM site. Maybe a few more, but that is what I remember.

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          • #6
            Re: classical organs



            My first pipe organ experience was at Kenmore Presbyterian in Buffalo, a church built like a cinema with a 3m Schlicker inside. Think I was 12. About a year later I got to see inside of one for the first time at an open consoleon the Shea's Buffalo 4/28 Wurlitzer as well as hear it from the inside.




            5 years later in 1996 I went to work for Schlicker and suddenly it wasn't a big deal anymore to go inside an organ's chambers, although there's a few that remain fresh in my memory, mainly late 19th-early 20th century beasts like the Johnson at Delaware Ave Baptist, a Hutchings at Lafayette Pres, we even did a little work on an Aeolian player residence organ in the Buffalo Historical Society. Also helped to rebuild a torched 1920's Austin pretty much from the ground up at a Methodist church in PA. Unfortunately in 1997 they started cutting back their extra staff, I was one of the first to go. I would have stayed with it otherwise.

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            • #7
              Re: classical organs



              The first pipe organ chamber I ever visited: a 1953 Austin of about 40 ranks.




              After working with an organ company I've gottena very close up view oflot of installations in my area. [:)]




              The most memorable visits (as a mere 'tourist'): the one and only Wanamaker organ; alsoCavaillé-Coll.

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