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The most annoying or sought out stop

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  • The most annoying or sought out stop

    What is your most anyoing stop or conversely what rank of pipes is a must for you on the fine unit orchestras.
    Instruments:
    22/8 Button accordion.

  • #2
    Most annoying is the English Post Horn, which I share the same feelings as Jesse Crawford, when asked why he did not include that stop on the "Crawford Special" Publix 1: "To protect the patrons from the organist! The Post Horn has a definite place in music, but is grossly overused by organists who tend to know when not to use it".

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    • #3
      Same sentiment here though I think a theater organs are not complete without it and only if it is used in moderation and in the right place.
      Instruments:
      22/8 Button accordion.

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      • #4
        late reply to this but the post horn is great for a solo stab, not as much to fill out the ensemble. I find the best use if for the pedal hold working up to a climax. Must use sparingly, but nothing like the 8' post horn to make a pedal point.

        Ron
        Ron Wilson in Indy
        Allen R311, Lowrey Sterling, Roland 80-SL, Hammond Elegante & BV, Technics SX-FN3 & Too Many Keyboards...

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        • #5
          There's another place for the English Post Horn if you can trem it. Jackie Brown recorded some great stuff on the Granada Tooting in the 60s. One track that sticks in the mind is "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", where he uses the EPH, tremmed, with block chords. Doesn't sound anywhere near as blasting as it might have been un-tremmed.

          And yes, I suppose the stab is where I use it most times. I don't have one on the Roland, but I can reach in the box of goodies on the classical side and use the Bombarde to good effect instead.

          Sought after? Give me a huge strings section and multiple voxes please!
          It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

          New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

          Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
          Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball something-or-other.
          Retired Leslies, 147, 145, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

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          • Ben Madison
            Ben Madison commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, i concider it a issue when the strings are not given a proper Vox Humana to to sing with.

        • #6
          Originally posted by andyg View Post
          There's another place for the English Post Horn if you can trem it. Jackie Brown recorded some great stuff on the Granada Tooting in the 60s. One track that sticks in the mind is "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", where he uses the EPH, tremmed, with block chords. Doesn't sound anywhere near as blasting as it might have been un-tremmed.

          And yes, I suppose the stab is where I use it most times. I don't have one on the Roland, but I can reach in the box of goodies on the classical side and use the Bombarde to good effect instead.

          Sought after? Give me a huge strings section and multiple voxes please!
          Do you mean the Granada that is actually in Tooting Andy?... I was born and bred in Tooting and passed the Granada everyday. Unfortunately long after the organ was played in the late 80s
          Chris Nabil - Owner of a Roland Atelier 900 Platinum.

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          • andyg
            andyg commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, that's the one! The organ is still in situ and was restored, but is listed as 'not currently playable'.

        • #7
          A theatre organ is awful sounding, if you don't know what you're doing. It's a deep study into blending sounds with other sounds.

          A beautiful Solo Tibia Clausa is my favorite. The Posh Horn is not meant to be a chorus stop. It's supposed to be a one noter most of the time, although it can be riffed or stabbed at, much like the trumpet section of a band or orchestra, where the Trumpet section tops the music with an occasional brass stab.

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          • #8
            I love the post horn i need something to punch through the strings and heavy flutes. I agree though EARLY Tibias from wurtizer were the cream of the crop.

            The horror of what some people what they did with a nice Tibia Rank and a band saw.
            Instruments:
            22/8 Button accordion.

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            • #9
              I know of one Tibia I'd like to see put through a wood chipper! Ha. But OTOH I've heard many stories about people opening up the toes, closing down the toes, increasing or decreasing wind pressures, and most important of all.....setting the tremulant and weights on the regulator just soooo. I'm not positive about this, but I think the prettiest tibias usually have a prominent 12th overtone that causes them to be so gorgeous when they have all the other influences (pressures and tremulant) set properly.

              And, of course, the pipes themselves may need some attention to arrive at the stage of beautiful tone. The tuning stoppers need to be tight, the leather lips need to be in good condition, and the caps removed and nicking brushed out to remove any debris caught in the nicks.

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