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  • Circles and dots

    Can anyone explain to me the circle, dots, circle & dots, and blanks above the stops pictured here on a Wurli?

    Big Bertha console
    Allen ADC 3500
    Hammond L100

  • #2
    Alabama Theatre organ? Big Red?

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

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    • Vebo
      Vebo commented
      Editing a comment
      Big Bertha, yes, Alabama Theater

  • #3
    The difference is it tells the organist which chamber the rank of pipes are in--such as main chamber(usually on stage left) and solo chamber(stage right). Need to know for the swell pedal to control the correct pipe chamber shutters(volume control).

    Michael

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    • #4
      The dot indicator is the Solo chamber. The plain indicator is the Main chamber. The circle indicator is the String chamber. Yes, that's the Alabama theatre in Birmingham. I cut my teeth on that organ.

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      • Vebo
        Vebo commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Jay! I’ve joined the crew as a noob. Trying to learn all I can online so I can learn more when I’m there!

      • Jay999
        Jay999 commented
        Editing a comment
        Hi Vebo. A Wurlitzer chest action is easy to understand. Get Larry D to show you how it works. And welcome to the Alabama Chapter ATOS.

    • #5
      Jay, Larry did explain it to me, very well and very accurately, but quickly and I probably looked overwhelmed - I've only had one day on the crew so far. I needed a bit more reading and some diagrams to make better sense out of what he had explained - kind of like studying and doing homework after class. =) The link above is actually to a site that gives a very detailed description of moving, renovating/restoring, and reinstalling a Wurli. I'm studying it closely so when I ask Larry something, I'll have some foundation going into the question.
      Allen ADC 3500
      Hammond L100

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      • #6
        Give it some time and several sessions, looking at each part of the action. It works like a piano action, where one impulse causes the initial start up of components to fire in a sequential order. Valves open, causing a pneumatic to collapse because of the air pressure exerted on the pneumatic. There are three valves...the one in the magnet (Armature) and the double acting valve connected to the small pneumatic (Primary), and the big one that admits air to the pipe (Secondary). All of these individual actions are connected by a series of chest borings, where the magnet and the pneumatics can dump their internal air outside, into the atmosphere.

        In the bottom board of the chest, there is a magnet, a small pneumatic, and a double acting valve connected to the small pneumatic. When you play a note, the electrical signal goes thru the magnet, causing the first valve to open (Armature).
        There is a channel boring between the magnet and the primary pneumatic. So when the armature opens in the magnet, the primary pneumatic will collapse its internal air out thru the magnet. As the primary pneumatic collapses, it opens it's connecting valve, the double acting one. Again, because there is a channel connecting this double acting valve to the large pneumatic up inside the chest (note motor pneumatic), when the double acting valve opens, the internal air inside the note motor pneumatic will collapse, exhausting thru the double acting valve. When the note motor collapses, it strikes the spoon on the note valve, causing the note valve to open, and let the chest pressurized air to enter into the pipe.

        The usual way a Wurlitzer chest action is described, it's broken down into two parts. The magnet and the small pneumatic, with it's double acting valve are called the "Primary" action. The large pneumatic and it's note motor valve, up inside the chest, is known as the "Secondary" action. If you can find a good drawing (side view) of a Wurlitzer chest action, you can follow this description and see what's going on. Hope this will help. All best wishes.

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        • #7
          http://hardmanwurlitzer.com/restoration/

          the link inserter keeps stripping restoration/ off so you don’t get to the right place.

          scan about halfway down the page, it’s a great diagram to go along with your explanation.
          Last edited by Vebo; 11-20-2019, 06:14 PM.
          Allen ADC 3500
          Hammond L100

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          • Admin
            Admin commented
            Editing a comment
            The Link formatter adds two links. The first one, the textual link with URL hidden, takes you to the exact page you entered for the URL while the URL link under it takes you to the Home Page of the website.

        • #8
          Ah. I see that now. Thanks!
          Allen ADC 3500
          Hammond L100

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