Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What does TC stand for?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What does TC stand for?



    I have yet to find a web site that explains this. Perhaps someone here can.</p>

    I've seen on some tabs things like (TC) 16 Horn. What does the TC stand for?</p>

    Thanks.</p>

    John
    </p>
    John
    Allen MDS-317 at home / Allen AP-16 at Church / Allen ADC-3100 at the stake center

  • #2
    Re: What does TC stand for?

    TC stands for Tenor C...meaning the "stop" is playable only from Tenor C & higher.....99% of the time this would mean the stop is a unit stop derived from a 8' rank ..i.e. a 16' Horn (TC) would almost certainly be derived from the 8' horn. Normally on theater organs and many classical organs the 8' rank is composed of 73 pipes, with a extra 12 notes at the top so the 8' rank can be a 4', 8' and 16' stop on the organ, from the ONE set of pipes.


    It is possible for space considerations for a 8' TC rank to be "straight", but that is usually reserved for celeste stops where the bottom notes are not usually built for a rank. I imagine there are a few 16' "ranks" on a few organs somewhere that are TC only but not playable at 8' but I've not yet encountered one where the pipes would be made playable at 8' as well.


    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What does TC stand for?

      Thanks! That cleared the mystery (to me, anyway) up.
      John
      Allen MDS-317 at home / Allen AP-16 at Church / Allen ADC-3100 at the stake center

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What does TC stand for?

        I actually like TC 16' stops as you can play full chords on them without being overly muddy, especially useful for hymns I think. With a full compass 16' stop the bottom notes tend to overpower. I have a FULL 16' bourdon that unfortunately is useless as a manual stop as it is just plain overly muddy..I'm going to reprogram it to be a TC 16' even though I have the pipes.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What does TC stand for?



          There are times when you definitely don't want a TC stop, such as when you need to play a running bass line in a Handel oratorio! [:)]</P>


          Skinner often borrowed the Pedal 16' Bourdon to the Great - that comes in handy when you need to do orchestral reductions.</P>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What does TC stand for?

            You'll also often find a celeste rank marked TC. Since the first octave is low in pitch, the celeste isn't really heard in that range. :)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: What does TC stand for?



              Oh but you can hear it!</P>


              Two organs I play onhave full compass Celestes. The tuning might need to be stretched a bit, but I figure if someone spent the money on it then we might as well hear it! [:)]</P>


              From inside the chamber it is so far out of tune as to sound terrible, but out in the room it is rather pleasant.</P>

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What does TC stand for?

                Here is a question. What does TC stand for in Allen TC4?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What does TC stand for?

                  regards full compass celestes: my Spitz Flute Celeste is FULL compass at 8'....I am using a slot on a unit chest to hold the pipes and had the holes already in place for the largest 8' octave of pipes, so I used the bottom octave of a spare 8' duliciana to fill out the 8' spitz celeste....the results are lovely...and yes..it is strange but you do feel them .... the strange part is they don't record so well...it causes a noticable audio distortion as the mics can't seem to handle the frequencies of those pipes, but in person they sound luscious.
                  br>


                  TC on a Allen: no idea but would be interested to know!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What does TC stand for?



                    Wild guess:</P>


                    "TC" for an Allen model might indicate "transistor classical" or "transistor church" . . .</P>


                    Edit: The "4" probably indicates four "ranks" of oscillators or the fourth generation of the TC models.</P>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What does TC stand for?



                      Brandon,</P>


                      I think TC in an Allen analog stands for "Transistor Classic" . . . Thevacuum-tube Allens that preceded the TC series werenamed with the letter "C" followed by a number, and the C was for "Classic" if I'm not mistaken. When theyswitched overto transistor oscillators, all the models were changed from C to TC with basically the same features and stops.</P>


                      Theywere called "classic" modelsto set them apart from the theatre and entertainment-style models that Allen was also making at the time.</P>


                      If I find out differently, I'll re-post, but I think this is the case.</P>


                      John</P>
                      <P mce_keep="true"></P>
                      John
                      ----------
                      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What does TC stand for?

                        But didnt they have a theatre organ that was TC6 or something?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What does TC stand for?



                          Menchen,</P>


                          Looks like we were posting at the same time with basically the same info. Must be correct if we both thought it!</P>


                          The numbers, such as the 4 in TC-4 don't necessary indicate the number of oscillator ranks, but do indicate the relative size and complexity of the organ.</P>


                          The TC-1 has the basic two ranks -- flute and diapason. The TC-3 has the same two ranks but has a reed trunk cobbled onto the flute generator so that a realistic trumpet stop is produced, with the drawback that it always sounds its corresponding flute note along with it, and is of course tuned in lock-step with the flute note.</P>


                          The TC-4 has a completely separate reed rank. I believe the celeste rank was an option with all these, or it may have been standard equipment on the TC-4.</P>


                          Of course Allen made these same models over a very long period of time, close to 10 years, so there were many variations and improvements along the way, as well as different types of power supplies, "whind" or not, assorted types of presets and capture systems, two, three, four, or more audio channels, chiff or not, percussion stops or not,etc.</P>


                          I believe near the end of the analog era Allen was using more elaborate schemes in the TC models with circuitry that made (for example) the flutes open on one manual and stopped on the other, etc. And on the really big TC organs (TC-6 and above) there would be elaborate circuitry to produce anumber of quite different sounding stops from the basic three oscillator ranks. They would use gang-switches and banks of resistors, for example, to make it possible to key a given rank with different keying voltages, producing quite unique tones.</P>


                          I'm sure there's more to it than that, but these are observations I've made over the years of servicing the analog Allens.</P>


                          Lest anyone get to waxing ecstatic over these old organs, keep in mind that the simplest and cheapest digitals today have vastly more variety and far more pipe-like tones. Of course, finding one of these in excellent playing condition makes for a wonderful practice or starter organ. But trying to restore one that has many problems is usually not worth the trouble.</P>


                          John</P>
                          <P mce_keep="true"></P>
                          John
                          ----------
                          *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X