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My rusty accordion playing

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    My rusty accordion playing


    If it's inappropriate to post this here, I apologise. I just thought the accordion forum could use a little activity.

    #2
    Almost missed this thread...
    Your playing isn't too bad, I've seen (and heard) a lot "rustier" players. One suggestion, though - when holding the last note/chord of the piece, don't change the direction of the bellows. Otherwise it will sound a bit "hiccupy".
    Traditionalists might tell you you shouldn't end a piece with the bellows open, but I'm not that dogmatic. It's the music that matters.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks. I do need a lot of practise though, and I can scarcely find time to take the accordion out of its case, let alone play it. I am working on a way to make it more accessible, though.

      I don't normally like to end bellows open either. But for the sake of the audio recording, I felt safer doing that than running out of bellows in the other direction. Had I practised more, I could eliminate that chance. But I was in a rush to get done; I for some reason wasted a lot of time on the guitar part. So I think I only practised the accordion part two or three times.

      Comment


        #4
        Here is my first step in accordion accessibility.



        Next, I should probably investigate different straps. The ones I have are extremely comfortable but very difficult to take on and off. But since they work I can't afford to replace them at this point.

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          #5
          Looks good!
          I keep all my instruments in their cases, I'm used to having it this way and haven't found any problems so far. At the moment, my future "music room" is still in use as the master bedroom, so the instruments have to remain more or less "mobile" and can't yet live on a shelf. Thanks for sharing the video, it's inspiring.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by andijah View Post
            Looks good!
            I keep all my instruments in their cases, I'm used to having it this way and haven't found any problems so far. At the moment, my future "music room" is still in use as the master bedroom, so the instruments have to remain more or less "mobile" and can't yet live on a shelf. Thanks for sharing the video, it's inspiring.
            Thank you!

            Best wishes on your future music room.

            Comment


              #7
              We used to keep silicate in a little bag in the accordion case to keep out mold and mildew.
              Not really sure it made a difference but it makes sense.

              Comment


                #8
                Hey KC9UDX, I've been away for about 4 weeks. Saw your stuff here and vid's; pretty good. I like the disassem/assem. I remember way back that the pins had a circular groove around the head and there was a tool to remove the pins. Good job. Dave

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by DaveADC6500 View Post
                  Hey KC9UDX, I've been away for about 4 weeks. Saw your stuff here and vid's; pretty good. I like the disassem/assem. I remember way back that the pins had a circular groove around the head and there was a tool to remove the pins. Good job. Dave
                  Thanks!

                  Yes these pins (all the ones I've seen) have a tall head with a circular groove. I think I have a tool for them somewhere. If this wasn't my accordion, I'd make it a point to find it, or make one. Or, heck, a "concrete nippers" (I think they're called that, but never used them for concrete, only to crimp hose clamp rings) would probably be good.

                  Matt

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                    #10
                    KC9UDX,
                    Yep, I know what you mean about the nippers but this was a little thing about the size of a fingernail file that was bent at one end about 1/2 inch in and had a V-slot in the bent part. The V-slot would just slide over the circular groove in the double-head of the pin and you just pull and remove without marking up the pin head. The tool was just a little thing made from very thin steel.

                    You know how it is about tools of a trade. They tend to be a lot of them and with many shapes and no one else knows what they are for except you !!
                    For a non-midi accordion there could be a few tools. I have plenty for my organ and syth's for repair and test.

                    E.G. did you ever replace the corner clips on the bellows?? I never did, but I can see where you could really get into a panic sweat over that. LOL This is a case where you should have every proper tool you need before you start that job !! Can you imagine what that could look like if that was your first time??

                    Some jobs, like the corner clips, should be sent out if you've never done them.
                    When I was a kid, my friend said 'yea, my dad fixed these 3 clips that were damaged'. I said, 'they still looked damaged'.

                    I have to say again... you make me miss my accordion !!
                    Dave

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                      #11
                      I have an accordion that sadly a cat ruined. I have plans to experiment on it. 😁

                      But it's anybody's guess when I'll have time.

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                        #12
                        I'll have to check my accordion. I didn't know they could get rusty.

                        Comment


                        • KC9UDX
                          KC9UDX commented
                          Editing a comment
                          It's not my accordion, it's my playing... It's gotten much worse. I can't get time to do so much as look at it.

                        • Silken Path
                          Silken Path commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Har, har, har.

                        #13
                        KC9UDX,

                        What is the viability/availability of finding replacement bellows vs. rebuilding them? I don't need any, but have been curious for a while. I have an old Hohner I need to repair, and am wondering just in case I need to replace the bellows.

                        Michael
                        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                        • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Originally posted by myorgan View Post
                          KC9UDX,

                          What is the viability/availability of finding replacement bellows vs. rebuilding them? I don't need any, but have been curious for a while. I have an old Hohner I need to repair, and am wondering just in case I need to replace the bellows.

                          Michael
                          I'm far from an expert. But from what I understand, if you have leaks at folds and corners, bellows are repairable. If you have gasket leaks, that is repairable. But if there are tears or other holes, they will need to be replaced. You can buy new bellows. Ernest Deffner sells them, and I assume there are others. In my experience, unless you have an already expensive accordion (more than the two or four registers that are so common), it's much more economical to purchase another similar used accordion than to replace the bellows.

                          If your bellows work at all, they're probably repairable. If you can't make enough pressure to sound one reed, probably not.

                          Comment


                          • myorgan
                            myorgan commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Thank you!

                            Michael
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