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  • KC9UDX
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Goodfellow View Post
    Alright! I do have a soldering iron, so I could use that. Would you advise getting any reed wax before attempting the job? If not, I might begin right away, proceeding with caution.
    I'd go ahead without it. If you need it, buy it at that point. You might be able to get by without it.

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  • Mr. Goodfellow
    replied
    Alright! I do have a soldering iron, so I could use that. Would you advise getting any reed wax before attempting the job? If not, I might begin right away, proceeding with caution.

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  • KC9UDX
    replied
    Cracked wax causes you to lose wind when you're playing that reed. You'll notice that some notes take more wind than others.

    Yours is cracked to the point where reeds are ready to come loose. If you were to continue playing it like that, you'd soon have a mess.

    That gap looks normal. Do remove the reed blocks. Before removing any blocks, mark them with a pencil so you know where to put them back. If you have a soldering iron, you can fix that wax. Just run your iron along the cracks. Don't move too slowly or you'll burn the wax. If you use a soldering iron make absolutely sure to remove all the solder and rosin from the tip first. If you don't have a soldering iron, you could improvise with a sacrificial spoon and a torch.

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  • KC9UDX
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you! No, I don't (yet). I've never actually done it. I might someday, and if I do, I'll surely make a video. I wish I'd made a video of re-waxing this one. If I get time (someday) I'll dig out my parts accordion and make some demonstration videos with it. I could even attempt to tune a reed.

  • Mr. Goodfellow
    replied
    And the last

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  • Mr. Goodfellow
    replied
    Mooore

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  • Mr. Goodfellow
    replied
    More photos...

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  • Mr. Goodfellow
    replied
    Alright! The accordion has been dissassembled. There is a lot of cracked wax and loose leather. A few of the treble reeds are missing the leather altogether. There's also a weird gap in the treble where it looks like there should be two reeds, but aren't.
    I shown a flashlight around in the bellows in the dark, and, though it glowed at the corners, the light didn't shine all the way through anywhere that I could find. So, does cracked wax make air leak and thus the air use inneficient? I'm a little confused on the result of that. I'm not taking any steps right this minute, so any advice would be appreciated!

    Sooo, here is an overload of pictures! It might take a few posts, since I can only do five at a time. Click image for larger version

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  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Excellent, informative video, KC. Do you also have one on re-leathering the pallets?

    Michael

  • Joey_Gleet
    replied
    Not sure which direction you are from STL but, these folks are in KCMo :http://www.kcaccordionrepair.com/

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  • KC9UDX
    commented on 's reply
    You're quite welcome. Happy New Year, and happy accordioning!

  • Mr. Goodfellow
    replied
    Thank you for the video, KC9UDX. I will undertake this operation as soon as I have time, which will hopefully be Friday. I believe the first time I open it up, I'll simply look around, take a lot of pictures, and carefully put it back together. I will continue to be careful with it before I can get some repairs done. Having looked inside, I'll be able to tell better what needs to be done. Thank you all very much for your help, and happy New Year!

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  • andijah
    replied
    Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
    I could be wrong but I expect that Vercelli is the maker.
    Vercelli is a town in northern Italy and home of the "Cooperativa armoniche Vercelli" (now Cooperfisa). For those who read/understand Italien, here's the website: http://www.cooperfisa.com/azienda-co...ria-cooperfisa



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  • KC9UDX
    replied

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Goodfellow View Post
    Though it would be nice to know the brand, I'm not so much interested in that as in assessing its current quality and eventually getting the repairs it needs. My current idea is to play it frequently for a month or so, and see what problems arise in the process, and then get it repaired. Any ideas would be welcome.
    While you said you don't necessarily need to know the brand, the name Vericelli indicates it was probably made in Italy, and since there are no reed selectors, it probably only has one set of reeds for the bass and one for the treble.

    Regarding its condition, some of your issues may have been a result of how the accordion was stored in the basement and the condition of the basement. If the basement was moist, you may find some keys stick (due to felts swelling), or there may be some surface oxidation on metal parts. As already mentioned the leather straps, etc. may be rotted or at least weakened. If the accordion was stored in an upright position and the basement was warm, the wax may have migrated over time from one area to another, causing notes to not work, etc. There have been other threads regarding wax migration in the past.
    Originally posted by Mr. Goodfellow View Post
    Current issues I've noticed:
    1) The bellows aren't the best. It's definitely playable as long as I'm not playing the bass notes. Chords and the right hand are fine to use, though it does take quite a bit of pumping. Though all the bass notes do seem to work, it takes so much air for them to operate that I can only play one for about a second before I need to change direction on the pumping. So, yeah, the bellows will need repair eventually.
    From your description and looking at the bellows, they appear to have seen better days. If you're lucky, you may be able to find a set of bellows to replace the others, but you may need to repair them. When removed, as another poster has described, you can shine a light inside, and anywhere you see the light coming through the bellows will need to be repaired.

    Re-reading your post, it also makes me wonder if it might not be engaging the button above the C Major button. The C row gives you the root of the chord, while the major/minor, etc. gives the 3rd and 5th of the chord. If the button engages any other buttons around it, that could account for the sound.
    Originally posted by Mr. Goodfellow View Post
    2)After a while, however, the C major chord started sounding a bit funny when the bellows are pulled outward. Rather than the rich major chord which I hear when depressing the bellows [snip], I hear a minor-ish sounding chord when pulling out. It seems that the C-major chord button might be sort of linked with what I think is the E-minor chord button, because one is somewhat depressed when the other is. Is this normal? I've only noticed this problem with the C-major button so far, but I imagine it could happen with others as well.
    The issue you describe sounds like one of three things. If the accordion has been dropped, sometimes the bass button mechanism will fall inside the accordion and cause what you describe. They can't suffer man-handling.

    Another possibility is that the wax has migrated and only affects the minor reed cell on the return. The last possibility is that the mechanism has been somehow compromised, and when you press the major button, it is somehow engaging the minor button. There is VERY LITTLE clearance between the mechanisms (like a flute, oboe, or clarinet), and the slightest bump can bend the mechanism so it contacts inside the accordion.

    That said, please let me warn you that messing with the bass mechanism inside the accordion is NOT for the faint of heart. Generally, it's best left to a professional.
    Originally posted by Mr. Goodfellow View Post
    The right hand keyboard seems to be in excellent condition, and I have noticed no problems in that area.
    The piano keyboard appears to have a couple of keys that need to be height-adjusted, but that's not a major issue with an older issue. I've never played an accordion yet that didn't have at least 1 key a fraction of an inch higher or lower than the rest.

    Please DO not try to break anything. You are better off treating the accordion with a bit of TLC, following KC9UDX's advice, and not creating any additional damage if possible. As already mentioned, there may be things running around, loose in the reed box, and it's best to find them before they cause damage. It might be a loose reed, migrated wax, or even a leather that has come off a valve.

    Hope this helps.

    Michael

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