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  • #31
    And the bottom of the unit. Hammond wants folks to see their name. ("Hyper" looked better.) It comes with a black-bellows-type hose and the mouthpiece has the metallic coating. Some folks have been disappointed that a plain Suzuki plastic nozzle was substituted with theirs. (I don't have strong feelings about this.)

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    Here's the serial number plate. As an aside, I'm not sure WHY some folks think that serial numbers for their musical instruments should be kept secret. I think it's fun to compare them. Hey, it was made in that factory in the film. I suspect that they sell a thousand plastic Suzuki "Melodion" branded models and hundreds of metal Melodions for each Hammond sold. This picture shows the metallic-appearing mouthpiece port and the *feet." It sits on the feet instead of the strap on a level surface. I certainly wondered about that when I saw what appeared to the deep dish in the tray.

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    Almost done. Here's the quarter-inch microphone jack, one of the defining features of the Hammond models. (They are also smaller, shorter bass and soprano models sold as Hammonds.) The middle cover is over the spit valve - you can see the tube protruding out between the end-case halves. Also, that's the guitar-strap doohickey.

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    And finally, here's the adjustable handle strap. I thought my Suzuki M37C had a tiny strap because it was built for tiny people. (And that's why the breathing hose is so short.) Okay, it must have cost Suzuki about a buck to include this. Why don't they use it on all their models?

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    Thank you attending this virtual unboxing.
    -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
    -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
    -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

    Comment


    • #32
      Here's one more picture. This is the Suzuki M-32C sitting beside the Hammond 44HPv2, with each aligned to show the overlap. On the Suzuki (bottom), the first C is middle C.
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      Now everybody can see why I'm interested in learning the Japanese two-handed technique. Of course, from playing piano/organ/keyboard, our brains are wired in that forward motion on keyboards. Playing the bass with the left hand requires reversing the learned, reflexive technique.

      One booger bear is that I have never been able to play tunes by ear. Everything I do is from reading music. I feel a glimmer, just a glimmer, that these devices may help me develop that "ear for music."

      I played a reed organ last week in a church with a woman who is a good pianist, but who does not look at her hymnal. Since I was reading from the hymnal and playing, she had to let me start before she'd match up with me. Boy, 46 years after I first sat down for a piano lesson, I'd love to be able to play anything I've heard... She is a more agile and proficient piano player than I am, but her timing is flexible. The congregation doesn't seem to mind. She says that the faster she plays, the more the people love it. I came from a church where the pianist was wonderful, but the hymns were ponderous, abetted by a huge old creaking Baldwin. At this little church, which is not so little, all things considered, she was "goosing me up" a bit with her playing. We finished a lot faster than I started.
      Last edited by Silken Path; 10-13-2020, 01:44 PM.
      -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
      -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
      -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

      Comment


      • afuller5
        afuller5 commented
        Editing a comment
        Lamar,

        I cannot play by ear either. I can play from memory without a book. I know how to add runs, fills, chord substitutions, etc. When I play without sheet music, sometimes people think I'm playing by ear. But I just developed a large "bag of tricks" to use when I play.

        Later,
        Allen

    • #33
      Gee, the breathing hose that came with the 44 is actually a little *shorter* than the Suzuki. But... they are interchangeable. I'll look for a fitting to connect them together.

      The Hammond IS easy to play, and it's not uncontrollably loud. Absent is a slight ringing sound that I hear on the M-37C. (I need to track that down - it may just be a matter of a strategically placed padding.)

      A few times, I've forgotten to faithfully blow the melodica out... and found out about it by finding spit in the case when I take the melodica out. Spit on the M-37C accumulates near the valve end... I have two thoughts about that. One is that Suzuki actually sells a rack that holds the melodica upright. You can use it for storage or play with it, I imagine with one short stool to sit on. The other is that the perforated case of the 44 may make spit less of an issue. One theory is that the moisture/droplets are actually the result of condensation - warm breath striking the reeds. Another theory is that it's just really is spit from looking down to play the melodica. Anyway, I've played one full song ("Stars Fell on Alabama") and it's already got moisture in it when I blow through it.

      I thought it was interesting that every Suzuki melodion is actually tested - the women in the video with the balloon device - by trying every note. I was wondering if they would apply pressure and see what the leak-down time was (or maybe submerge it).
      -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
      -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
      -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

      Comment


      • Silken Path
        Silken Path commented
        Editing a comment
        Saliva, it turns out, is NOT less of an issue on the Hammond. In fact, I've clogged up a reed or two despite frequently blowing it out through the lower drain. To my surprise, pulling the hose out, inverting the melodica, and shaking it brought out a considerable amount of water. So I think that the best technique is to use the drain between songs and turn it up and shake it out every thirty minutes or so.

    • #34
      The Melodica Men have a series of instructional videos on YouTube. This one discusses expression and vibrato.

      And for the approaching Halloween, here's their take on a familiar classic

      -Admin

      Allen 965
      Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
      Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
      Hauptwerk 4.2

      Comment


      • #35
        Thank you, Admin - I didn't know that they had serious videos, too. I'm watching them now.

        I learned today that almost ANY guitar strap, from the cheapest to the $200 leather straps, will fit the Hammond Melodion. The straps have basically a 1/8-inch hole with a slit radiating from it, and the weight of the instrument pulls the hole against the pin. I picked an inch wide, plain black strap with the Peavy logo sewn to one end. It was $5.99. (Walked out with an adjustable music rack, too.)

        Chick's is one old fashioned music store. They had a selection of guitars, amps, PA equipment, etc. but I didn't find any effects pedals to browse, and the sheet music department is a shade of what I remember. I suspect that school band rentals and repairs, and maybe a few pianos a year, is keeping them going. They started in 1942 in the same location.
        -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
        -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
        -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

        Comment


        • #36
          Well, I tried the Hammond with one of my amps - a KC100 60w - and it sounds just like... the Hammond. I don't know WHAT I was expecting.

          Next, I'll have to learn about pedals that I can use to alter the sound from it. I have a Neo Vent II that can run on one channel, but I think it takes both to get a decent Leslie simulation. My Boss expression pedal (that I use with the Juno when it pretends to be an organ) has a through-mode with 1/4" input and output. I'll probably try that and see if it has any effect. Other than trying those, I'm a babe in the woods on this topic. The amps have an unamplified monitor circuit that can be used for headphones, so I should be able to hear any added effects that way.


          -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
          -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
          -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

          Comment


          • #37
            Found out why Suzuki includes a trumpet mouthpiece with their melodicas. How one holds one's mouth, teeth, and lips matters. Purse them up and buzz, and you can play a melodica like a trumpet. Vocalize sounds like "thco" or a roller R, the Melodica Men show, and you can get effects. Admin turned me on to those tutorials, and I found this informative article at Wikipedia.

            Embouchure - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embouchure - is the use of the lips, facial muscles, tongue, and teeth in playing a wind instrument.

            One can put one's tongue tapping the mouthpiece and get a staccato effect, or you can puff, puff, puff wind bursts to simulate staccato notes. So far I find the puffs easier to do than an up and down swiping motion or back and forth covering and uncovering motion of my tongue.

            By the way, I have put a couple of hours in on the Allen today - I'm not going NUTS with this melodica thing.

            But, to bring it back to the nutty side, I do plan to work on the two handed vertical method of playing, as I have a natural endowment up front that tilts the keyboard upward so I can see it. In time I will adapt to the size/spacing of the keys and be able to play it without looking. A 44 is a bit long, big, and heavy (three pounds) to hold up like a trumpet, but it sure looks cool to do it.
            -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
            -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
            -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

            Comment


            • Silken Path
              Silken Path commented
              Editing a comment
              By the way, that natural endowment is my TUMMY. Hush your dirty mind!

            • jbird604
              jbird604 commented
              Editing a comment
              Now you made me have to go back and re-read the post!

          • #38
            Originally posted by Silken Path View Post
            Embouchure - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embouchure - is the use of the lips, facial muscles, tongue, and teeth in playing a wind instrument.

            One can put one's tongue tapping the mouthpiece and get a staccato effect, or you can puff, puff, puff wind bursts to simulate staccato notes. So far I find the puffs easier to do than an up and down swiping motion or back and forth covering and uncovering motion of my tongue.
            Lamar,

            As you probably know already, nearly all instruments supplied with wind via a person's breath use various embouchures where breathing, mouth, and tongue techniques vary and produce varied results. When I work with a student on a new instrument, teaching them to control the wind and articulation by touching the tip of the tongue to the roof of the mouth isn't a natural behavior–until I have them use speaking patterns they already know. You've already described rolling (trilling) a rolled R or a T to provide a flutter-tongue effect.
            • Ta–provides a sharp attack, but then leaves the throat open and the tongue down so the sound can begin before the mountpiece even comes into play.
            • Dah–provides a softer attack, but also leaves the throat open and the tongue down.
            • Steady air–provides only the separation of notes on the melodica, or on a wind instrument, a slurred or phrased passage.
            There are other syllables one can use, but I'll leave it there. One can search embouchure techniques on the Internet to learn more. Hope this helps get people started.

            Michael
            Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
            • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
            • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
            • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

            Comment


            • myorgan
              myorgan commented
              Editing a comment
              Comes from the French word, "bouche." Literally translated it is "mouth."

              Michael

            • jbird604
              jbird604 commented
              Editing a comment
              So the Flute Bouchee on my Allen is a "mouth flute" I guess. I never knew that.

            • Silken Path
              Silken Path commented
              Editing a comment
              Ah, an open mouth flute. (My Allen can close it as well.)

          • #39
            Here's a pedal I've seen mentioned at MelodicaWorld:
            And I forgot that I have a NanoVerb. It has an uncommon factory defect where it makes a gunshot sound every now and then, and their tech support told me something dismissive like "Oh, that," which annoyed me greatly. Anyway, I shall try IT between the Hammond and the amp, too.

            So far I've come up with a Boss pedal, a Neo Ventilator, and an Alesis Nanoverb that I can try between the Hammond and the amp.

            I'm after that sound the gentlemen previously linked was getting with his Hammond 44 in 2012.

            One of the "testimonials" at the Lone Wolf page

            https://www.lonewolfblues.com/store/...cts/harp-delay

            is from Lowboy Bootay in 2015. He's an accomplished melodica player. Little tacky of them to charge extra for the 9V wall wart, but that may be some kind of norm for pedals. What do I know?
            -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
            -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
            -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

            Comment


            • Silken Path
              Silken Path commented
              Editing a comment
              Lowboy Bootay is actually an accomplished blues player who has a gangster-style suitcase of melodicas.

            • Silken Path
              Silken Path commented
              Editing a comment
              Of course I found out that the in and out on the Boss don't work with... microphones! I'm still not needing to make it "louder."

          • #40
            Some progress to report...

            I have a new guitar strap. This one is a max of 60" inches long, which provides a lot of flexibility. It can be worn around the neck for vertical playing or waist-level playing (if the hose were long enough), and around the neck and over the shoulder for additional support for holding on with the device's hand strap, and from that position it can be swung around to the back similar to how Johnny Cash would flamboyantly twist around his guitar and reach for the microphone. Remember that? (click to enlarge)

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            Alas. Outfits that sell Suzuki and Hammond in the US don't have to stock parts OR repair them. Parts for the Suzuki and Hammond have to be ordered from Japan. So far I've ordered:

            1 - spare long black mouthpiece hose (as in the photo)
            1 - extension tube - goes between the hose and the melodion
            1 - spare set of new, sealed reed-plates for the Hammond

            This effectively means that one will have to learn how to repair one's own melodica, including re-tuning the reeds (by filing/thinning the reed) and replacing broken reeds. It also means that one should be very careful purchasing older units. Parts may not be available at all.

            https://melodicaworld.com/

            is a good source of information. It's a slow, slow forum... but the eyeballs come and go, and somebody might eventually respond if you have a question... The forum's back history is a good survey tool for reading back into past discussions (when the forum was more lively).

            I found out that Japanese merchants on eBay don't mind haggling some, but pick your starting offer wisely, because you're going to meet somewhere in the middle of your offer and the counter offer.

            If you can find your part offered on a Japanese web page, you can provide the URL to Google translate to read the description and translate the page and, with another search, convert from yen to dollars. This will tell you the retail price of the object in Japan. Thus you can decide if you're being offered a fair price for the product + shipping. Some prices you'll find are atrocious, and many products that seem to be reasonably priced will have a shipping rate that makes the actual price precisely match that other merchant who offers free shipping. Beware.

            Replacement parts that I haven't sourced yet include the internal gasket that I'll need if I ever split the reed case. The Suzuki has a bladder that helps suppresses sharp pressure increases (and in theory helps the low notes). I'd like to have a spare for that, too.

            I've been using the Expand-a-Lung twice per day (and washing it every day) so far without any ill effects or perceived benefit. I'm getting better at providing a steady breath flow, but it requires constant attention - and goes all wacky if my attention darts off to something else (like actually playing the melodion.)

            So far I've been enjoying playing the melodicas. The extra bass keys on the Hammond make getting down and dirty (Meat Loaf "Two Out of Three Ain't Bad") on the low end possible. I have a lot to learn before I'll ever show this thing in public.
            -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
            -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
            -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

            Comment


            • Silken Path
              Silken Path commented
              Editing a comment
              The breathing tube has arrived first. I'm currently looking for a US-common replacement for the tiny O-ring used on the mouthpiece. Folks are 3D printing replacements for the older models.

            • Silken Path
              Silken Path commented
              Editing a comment
              I've also been working more on playing the Hammond softer than with an amp - it's considerably louder (and brighter) than the Suzuki.

          • #41
            I got an email indicating that KMC Music, partnering with Suzuki as education @ suzukicorp.com, will be setting up a US Suzuki and Hammond website for K12 music departments. I had asked if they would stock parts for the melodions, and they indicated it would be a full-service website - suzukimusic.com (It's just a framework currently.)

            ***
            Lamar,
            Yes, we are revamping the website and should have that done to resume business as normal hopefully next month.
            Thanks!
            Dan
            ***
            Resume, I guess, in response to Covid and the worldwide depression... Although I have no complaints about the Japanese merchants I've ordered parts from, it will be nice to have a US source for replacement parts and wear items.
            Last edited by Silken Path; 10-26-2020, 11:20 PM.
            -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
            -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
            -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

            Comment


            • myorgan
              myorgan commented
              Editing a comment
              Great information to have, Lamar! Thank you.

              Michael

          • #42
            I have ordered a Hohner Performer 37, just because I'm curious about how they feel and sound, and because an eBay merchant actually *took* my offer, which was 2/3 of what Sweetwater was asking for the same melodica. I'll include a less elaborate unboxing when it arrives.

            There's not much other news. I've been playing the Suzuki holding it up like a trumpet, and it's HARD on the knuckles. I'm thinking about making an adjustable leather strap for it - I have a sewing machine that can do it.
            -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
            -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
            -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

            Comment


            • #43
              Here's another youngster named Dr. Tor Bekken playing "Inchworm" on an interesting (and heavy looking) old Hohner metallic. It's only about a minute.



              There's a slow, but steady market for old melodicas. In this age of Covid confusion, I wonder what the risk is in a buying a used one. In general, I don't think they are hard to open and clean... so I suspect that soap and water would do the trick.
              -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
              -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
              -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

              Comment


              • #44
                There's a very nice intro to Melodica technique - "The Amazing Melodica Tutorial!" - at MelodicaWorld forums.

                https://melodicaworld.com/forums/top...ial-fragments/

                In accord with what Michael MyOrgan wrote above, here's a little of the content of the tutorial.

                (This guy is a Russian-Israeli and English is his third language. I haven't done much editing.)

                ***
                Breathing techniques
                Unlike with other wind instruments, on Melodica you can use talking breathing techniques, due to the simplicity and easiness of sound making. These techniques include exhalation from the lungs and from the diaphragm. Inhaling is, naturally, done through the nose.
                ***
                Very important, cardinal note: Any sound created by you on Melodica, always should be based on a concrete word / short syllable from your talking vocabulary!
                ***
                Apart for using breathing to create sound (here Melodica replaces vocal cords as an external sound source), all the breathing organs used for singing or talking, can and should be used while playing Melodica – diaphragm, throat, front and back parts of the tongue, mouth cavity and lips.


                Instrument with a mouthpiece reacts very well to pronouncing consonants ‘g’, k’, ch, throaty ‘r’, ‘t’, ‘d’, ‘p’, ‘b’. Other consonants – ‘l’, ‘s’, sh’, ‘shch’ – do not come through so well. Of course, articulation of any sound, whether long or short, does not start with a single consonant but with syllables: ‘Ta’, ‘Da’, Tee’, ‘Dee’, ‘Bee’, ‘Boo’ etc. , per your imagination.

                Consonants “P”, “B’, “T’, “D” are best suited for accents.

                Prolonged, not accentuated sounds are being played simply like ‘Aaaa’ or ‘Haaa’

                ***
                Note that a few pages in, he stops with the Word document "fragments" and starts posting the content directly into the thread, including repeating the already posted parts. In other words, if you want to SAVE the content, don't mess with downloading the fragments. Keep going.

                I should be getting the (current tech) new Hohner Performer 37 in tomorrow, and today I "won a best offer" for two old Hohners - a Piano 36 and 26 - that were supposedly owned by singer-songwriter Paul Davis (65 Love Affair) and that have been in storage since the 80s. These have the vinyl cases and original books with them. (They were NOT expensive.) These could turn into a boondoggle if I can't find the parts to fix them, and I don't think they were using anti-corrosion reeds back then.
                -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic project, 1899 Kimball project
                -- 5 melodicas, Rodgers W5000, RD300NX, Juno DS-61/88, FA-06 - Conn 643 - Hammond M3 - Hauptwerk
                -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

                Comment


                • Silken Path
                  Silken Path commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I need to add that the author's name is Nachum Pereferkovich and this

                  http://www.jazzideas.com/

                  is his website. And he was Latvian, not Russian, and is now an Israeli. On the MelodicaWorld site, he makes this statement in the thread:

                  "By putting my stuff publicly, I hope that each of you will pass them on to others, as in Pyramid system. I see the ultimate goal is that the melodica will become one of the main educational instruments, the status of which will be at the same height as the Orff instruments. The special properties of this tool allow restoring for beginner students the lost connection between music and native language."

              • #45
                Yes! 😊 My first Ebay purchase way back in the first month of Ebay. My sister was the 500th Ebay user! So on a whim I bid $13 on a red metal Hohner 'Alto' Melodica , and won!! I was immediately hooked on this new 'world flea market booth' concept. Iirc my sister had to upload her "items for sale" images overnight due to slow dial-up baud rates back then.
                My red Melodica quickly became adored by all who played it. Which was everyone who touched it. lol
                Such a friendly little red toy...🙊💨🚠
                "Hey this is a fun toy".... " Oh but it's not a toy young fellow, it's a seriously fun toy! Ha ha ha"

                I've used it in the studio, in many impromptu jams. The dynamics are splendid. The melodica through effects can render wonderful strings, saxaphones, synth fuzz.
                Best $13 I ever spent. After several years I passed it along to my niece. She was in 4th grade and took to it quickly. She liked it better than her recorder. Hey if a kid likes anything non techno these days it's great.

                This one is listed for imho a very fair price ($70, +$10.? Shh) [I'm not affiliated] plus many great pics 😊. It's at etsy DOT com ,and the listing title is Vintage Hohner Melodica 25 Key Alto Mouth Instrument $70.00 (Seller is RelovableRelics )
                Etsy seems to have a few. The green one is Suprano. There is an orange 'Student' and a grey 'Student.

                Hey for a real treat check out this hilarious and quite musical SCTV cast mockumentary . The Shmenges: The Last Polka -Youtube ( on SCTVnotonDVD channel)



                Wurlitzer '46' Model 31 Orgatron & 310 rotary cab, 56' 4410 , 65' 4300
                Hammond '55' S6 Chord Organ,HR-40,ER-20, 1971 X66/& 12-77 tone cabinet w/ 122 kit & TREK Transposer- of which I've retrofitted a Wurlitzer/Lowrey 'PedAL gLIdE' awesome!
                Gulbransen 61' 1132 '76' Rialto II & Leslie 705 + two 540
                Conn '57' 406 Caprice '59' 815 Classic (the 29th 815)
                PLEASE SAVE THE WURLITZER ELECTROSTATIC CONTINUOUS-FREE-REED ORGANS 1953'-1961' Hammond TW's ONLY TRUE COMPETITOR! (Ggl> NSHOS WURLI 4600)

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